"Discover Cooking, Discuss Life."

Go Back   Discuss Cooking - Cooking Forums > Recipes & Ingredients > Beef, Pork, Lamb & Venison > Beef
Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
 
Old 10-30-2004, 11:27 PM   #1
 
Join Date: Jun 2004
Posts: 1,018
PotRoast Suggestions

Haven't had a potroast in a long time, and was thinking how to do this the nicest...

Bought a 1.4 Kg Sirloin Tip Roast today, and set it to marinate tonight, in a mix of garlic chips (2 tbspn), Mesquite Marinade (1/2 cup), Herb Garlic Marinade (1/2 cup), Seasoned Rice Vinegar (1/4 cup) and a number of "dashes" of Worcestshire, and a few shots of hot sauce, well massaged...

The plan is to transfer this to the Correlle pot, covered, with carrots, small yellow onions, blocks of rutabaga (ie 1" cubes), some onion soup mix and a bunch of stock, with either a tad of flour or veloutine mixed into it, cold, to thicken up, with some BBQ sauce and/or ketchup later...cooking it covered, as there's no much fats in this roast, and adding some barley at the start, and frozen peas at the end...

Any suggestions for changes (Okay, I can't change the marinade now!) or other ideas, please post...

Lifter

__________________

__________________
Lifter is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-31-2004, 04:13 AM   #2
Sous Chef
 
Join Date: Aug 2004
Posts: 843
Usually, I liberally coat with seasoned salt, then flour and I brown it on all sides in the pot I'm going to cook the potroast in. I then turn the heat way down, add a touch of water and let it simmer on low for an hour or two, depending on the meat. Then I put the root veggies around it for another hour or until all is tender.

I've never marinated it like you have, so I don't think I can be of much help.
__________________

__________________
Psiguyy is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-31-2004, 05:08 PM   #3
Head Chef
 
Audeo's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2004
Location: USA,Texas
Posts: 1,871
I would post my admiration and support of Psiguyy again by echoing his method. I brown my seasoned roast in my cast iron stew pot (very hot), add maybe half a cup of water and a bay leaf or two, then simmer as low as possible tightly covered and forget about it. Vegetables come in about an hour or so before serving.

Gotta echo you, too, Lifter with the Rutabagas, in that I typically put some turnips in, along with potatoes and carrots.
__________________
Pain is inevitable. Suffering is Optional.
Audeo is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-31-2004, 07:12 PM   #4
 
Join Date: Jun 2004
Posts: 1,018
Thanks for the thoughts, both of you!

In the end, I went with a whack of beef stock, flavoured with my next door neighbour's homemade merlot (a retired engineer, he keeps me afloat in it, in return for a free hand at my tomato's cukes and peppers through the summer), onions, celery, and carrots altegether for two hours in a slow oven, seasoned with BBQ sauce, garlic, Worcestshire and bay leaves...Gravy made thick with Veloutine, mashed potatoes on the side....it was pretty tasty as "Brit" meals go...and now have an enormous stock of gravy for hot beef sandwiches this week...(note I like to cook the veggies in there with it as the exchange of flavours-they both "give and recieve-enhances the dish, and at 2 hours, they're not that overcooked...)

The marinade, Psiguyy, is in order to introduce some different flavours to the beef, and to tenderise it...no I don't wash it off, but I discard the marinade before cooking...and unlike you, I don't brown the meat in a pan beforehand; two hours cooking on a roast this small produces a "well-done" result, regardless of browning, and I prefer to think that the "un-browned" meat sops up the flavours better....

At the instance of doing this, I couldn't find any pot-barley, which is too bad, as it would have added a lot...so I'm hoisted on the petard of the 5 P principle...

Lifter
__________________
Lifter is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-31-2004, 07:35 PM   #5
Executive Chef
 
marmalady's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2004
Location: USA,SouthCarolina
Posts: 2,642
Actually, Lifter, the browning I think, does introduce flavor, from all those wonderful brown bits; also helps to 'color the gravy. And I'd also have to say that as far as using a marinade to tenderize, the braising will do the tenderizing to make the meat 'fall apart tender'.

I guess I'm just a 'don't mess with my post roast' kinda gal! I use a bone in chuck roast, brown it in some oil, then brown some onions and garlic; add a little stock, salt/pepper, and let 'er cook. I usually serve roasted carrots and mashed ptoatoes with it, so the pot roast itself is pretty 'pure'.
__________________
marmalady is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-31-2004, 11:31 PM   #6
Sous Chef
 
Join Date: Aug 2004
Posts: 843
I guess we just learned how to do a pot roast in the non-classical way! I wonder if I would miss the taste that comes from browning the meat first?

I like coating with flour first because the flour ends up thickening the gravy that develops. I kinda like slicing the meat and veggies, then pouring that delicious gravy over all.

Free merlot from an engineer neighbor? There's gotta be a story there. :)
__________________
Psiguyy is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-31-2004, 11:39 PM   #7
 
Join Date: Jun 2004
Posts: 1,018
He does like my fresh veggies, and I make a point of taking them there...and yeah, I buy some of the good imports on occaision, and give them a taste with Dave+Jean...pretty good neighbourhood here...

Lifter

(Its what you try and make it)
__________________
Lifter is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-01-2004, 02:09 AM   #8
Chef Extraordinaire
 
buckytom's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2004
Location: My mountain
Posts: 18,725
i usually make a rub out of whatever spices i pull out of the spice rack, such as parsley, rosemary, oregano, garlic powder, black pepper and sea salt, then rub on the roast. i brown it very well on all sides in olive oil in a large pot, then add water or beer to the pot up to the lower third of the roast. after simmering for an hour uncovered, i put in some whole small onions, 1/2'd celery stalks, and carrots, and top off the beer or water to the 1/3 to 1/2 mark on the roast. simmer until tender for roughly 2 hours more.
__________________
in nomine patri, et fili, et spiritus sancti.


Meh nom eh noh...doot dooooo do do do.
buckytom is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 11-01-2004, 04:10 PM   #9
Master Chef
 
jennyema's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2002
Location: Boston
Posts: 9,257
Browning of the meat before braising is not to cook it, it's to develop meaty flavor. Browning lets the denatured proteins on the surface of the meat recombine with the sugars present.

This is called the Maillard reaction.

It accounts for most of the "meaty" flavor in your pot roast. From a food science perspective meat has little flavor until it's browned at at temp above 285 degrees (much hotter than stewing it in 200 or so degree liquid). If you don't brown it first, most of the flavor has to come from additional ingredients and not the meat itself. And it, by def., won';t be as "meaty" tasting that way.

Browned meat has no trouble absorbing other flavors -- contrary to popular belief searing does not "seal in" juices -- it just adds additional complexityand depth to your roast or stew.
__________________
jennyema is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-01-2004, 04:21 PM   #10
 
choclatechef's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2004
Location: USA
Posts: 1,680
Quote:
Originally Posted by marmalady
Actually, Lifter, the browning I think, does introduce flavor, from all those wonderful brown bits; also helps to 'color the gravy. And I'd also have to say that as far as using a marinade to tenderize, the braising will do the tenderizing to make the meat 'fall apart tender'.

I guess I'm just a 'don't mess with my post roast' kinda gal! I use a bone in chuck roast, brown it in some oil, then brown some onions and garlic; add a little stock, salt/pepper, and let 'er cook. I usually serve roasted carrots and mashed ptoatoes with it, so the pot roast itself is pretty 'pure'.
That is how mom taught me to cook pot roast!

Ditto Audeo, on the cast iron dutch oven!
__________________

__________________
choclatechef is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Tags
None

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
SUGGESTIONS FOR THE NEW SITE GB Forum Admin: Tech Support & Announcements 46 03-28-2005 11:56 PM
SUGGESTIONS FOR DISCUSS COOKING? Andy R Forum Admin: Tech Support & Announcements 66 03-08-2005 07:21 PM
Utensil Suggestions ptr_hml Cook's Tools 2 12-27-2004 04:11 PM
Cake Walk Suggestions crewsk Cakes & Cupcakes 26 10-30-2004 09:09 AM
Mahi Mahi Suggestions???? ginacc Fish & Seafood 2 02-25-2004 09:04 PM


» Discuss Cooking on Facebook

Our Communities

Our communities encompass many different hobbies and interests, but each one is built on friendly, intelligent membership.

» More about our Communities

Automotive Communities

Our Automotive communities encompass many different makes and models. From U.S. domestics to European Saloons.

» More about our Automotive Communities

Marine Communities

Our Marine websites focus on Cruising and Sailing Vessels, including forums and the largest cruising Wiki project on the web today.

» More about our Marine Communities


Copyright 2002- Social Knowledge, LLC All Rights Reserved.

All times are GMT -5. The time now is 12:00 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 4
Copyright ©2000 - 2016, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.