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Old 06-06-2009, 04:19 PM   #1
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Prime Rib Ignoramous Here...

I love Prime Rib and couldn't resist when my grocery store had it on sale for like 1/3 of the regular price. It was like a $40 plus dollar cut for like $15. This was probably my first mistake...I decided to freeze it because I had it in the fridge for a few days and wasn't going to be able to cook it anytime soon and I didn't want it to go bad. So, I'm thinking of how it looks when I buy it in a restaurant...and I decide to make it look that way when I put it in the freezer and I slice it into to three pieces, the size of which what you usually get in a restaurant. I finally get around to looking up how to cook it and all the recipes are for the full cut, not the slices like I now have.

So, I need some advice on how to cook it. I guess I could just follow the same recipe and modify the cooking times. Start out with like 400 degrees and then lower it to like 300. I've seen it different ways, some do 500 at first then 200, and some do 400 then 300. I usually love my steaks cooked pretty good on the outside, almost to the point of being burned, but with prime rib I like it TOTALLY soft and mushy, so I don't think cooking at 500 initially will get it the way I like because it would make the outside too cooked. I got it that way at a restaurant somehow by mistake one time and it wasn't even like Prime Rib to me any more, I would have been happier with a hamburger. I like it medium rare, to where it's just BARELY still pink on the outside, and the inside isn't completely rare, but kinda pinkish.

Thanx for any advice....

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Old 06-06-2009, 04:25 PM   #2
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Having cut it into three "restaurant" portions, by which I assume you mean one rib bone and attached meat per portion, I think you pretty much have to treat it like bone-in rib eye steaks. I believe that if you tried to roast it as if it hadn't been cut, it will get dried out and overdone in the middle. However, I'm just guess here -- maybe someone else has figured out a way to do this successfully. But I would grill it. CLICK ME
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Old 06-06-2009, 05:05 PM   #3
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^^^^^^^ What Scotch said ^^^^^^^^

$5 per bone in rib-eye is a great price!!

Enjoy!
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Old 06-06-2009, 06:49 PM   #4
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Unfortunately, I don't have a grill. Wouldn't it be too thick to grill, though?

I'll enjoy it if I can figure out how to cook it..
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Old 06-06-2009, 07:00 PM   #5
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Actually, it wouldn't be too thick to grill, but you would have to grill carefully.

Since you don't have a grill, you could use a grill pan or (carefully) use the broiler in your oven. However you choose to cook it, it will be delicious. Enjoy!
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Old 06-06-2009, 07:46 PM   #6
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i agree put it under the broiler.
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Old 06-06-2009, 08:17 PM   #7
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Do you have a large frying pan, preferably cast iron? If so, maybe you can pan broil it, although just one steak at a time.
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Old 06-06-2009, 08:34 PM   #8
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Pan roast them forsure, season heavily with coarse salt and pepper, sear in cast iron if you have, or a nice fry pan if not, get it nice and hot, then add oil and get oil nice and hot just before smoking point sear good on one side, then flip throw in some butter and into the oven, baste with butter when you remove it, and rest. Thats how I would do it Hope whatever you do turns out good cause thats a hell of a deal you got!
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Old 06-06-2009, 09:17 PM   #9
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I know this will sound bizarre but will work.

Buy some 100% cotton string and tie the pieces back together as they were originally. Feel free to use plenty of string and tie it up so all parts are tightly together.

Now you can roast it according to the directions you have for a roast and you will be able to separate it into slices by cutting the string. You will have the same as a restaurant serving of prime rib.
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Old 06-06-2009, 09:24 PM   #10
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Andy M. View Post
I know this will sound bizarre but will work.

Buy some 100% cotton string and tie the pieces back together as they were originally. Feel free to use plenty of string and tie it up so all parts are tightly together.

Now you can roast it according to the directions you have for a roast and you will be able to separate it into slices by cutting the string. You will have the same as a restaurant serving of prime rib.
Andy is right. I don't know why I didn't think of this either. His method is simply "reconstructing" the meat. If tied securely, you should be fine.
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