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Old 01-22-2005, 10:31 AM   #1
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Recipe- Meatloaf

Meatloaf:


2 lbs ground beef
1 lb ground pork
1 lb italian sausage
1/2 lb chopped bacon
4 eggs
1/2 c chopped chives
1/2 c chopped green peppers
1/2 c chopped red onion
8 ounces fresh bread crumbs
4 ounces chopped garlic
1/4 cup olive oil
Salt and Pepper to taste

Parchment Paper
Non-Stick Cooking Spray

In a large mixing bowl combine beef, pork, sausage, bacon,peppers, chives, onions, eggs, bread crumbs, olive oil and garlic.

When mixed...spray parchment paper with non-stick cooking spray. Put meat mixture in parchment and roll in to loaf. Bake on sheet at 350 degrees fo about 35-40 minutes.



Allow meatloaf to cool before slicing.

MeatLoaf Stack

Garlic Buttered Grilled Texas Toast
Mashed Potatoes
6 oz Meatloaf
Onion Straws
Topped with Mushroom Gravy

Enjoy!!!

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Old 01-22-2005, 10:35 AM   #2
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erik thank you so much for posting this. it sounds soooo delish.
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Old 01-22-2005, 10:36 AM   #3
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I agree. Never thought to add bacon to meatloaf, but what a good idea!
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Old 01-22-2005, 10:55 AM   #4
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hmmm, what about putting strips of bacon across the top as well?

thanks erik!!!
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Old 01-22-2005, 11:00 AM   #5
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If you are going to bake in in a pan should work well.

Now, when I do Prime Rib, I put bacon across the top.
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Old 01-22-2005, 11:32 AM   #6
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This is really more af a pate', but could be considered a meat loaf as it is cooked in a loaf pan and made from meat. In any case, once you make it, it really opens a whole 'nuther world of meat recipes to your arsenal. You will have ideas just popping in your head.

Chicken and Pork Loaf.

Cut 1 boned boned chicken and a 2 lb. pork roast into long, thin strips, about an inch wide. Finely dice a shole onion and 2 cloves af garlic. Mix the onion and garlic together. Lightly grease the inside edges of a laof pan. Press a single layer of meat strips to cover the pottom and sides of the loaf pan. Sprinkle with salt, pepper, and sage, onion and garlic. Alternate layers of pork and chicken, with seasonings and onion/garlic mixture between. Fill loaf pan. Sprinkle top with paprika or bread-crumbs as desired.

Bake at 375 until the thermometer reads 170 degrees. REmove from the oven and either serve hot, or chill in the refrigerator overnight. Slice thin for use in sandwiches.

If you're going to serve hot, you might want to beat an egg and combine with the meat before building the loaf, so all will stick together. If serving cold, elliminate the egg as the gelatin produced by the meat collagen and protiens will hold it all together.

As I said, once you make this once, you will undoubtedly come up with a thousand variations. Enjoy.

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Old 01-27-2005, 08:41 PM   #7
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The bacon strips across the top sounds like a wonderful. And add some grated cheese just shortly before the meat loaf is done.
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Old 01-28-2005, 11:01 AM   #8
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Goodweed - just curious - why do you consider this a pate? Isn't a pate a creamier/smoother texture - not the texture of meatloaf? Hoping you'll teach me yet another thing today!
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Old 01-28-2005, 05:24 PM   #9
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I believe I learned this technique from my favorite cookbook - The Joy of Cooking - many years ago. Epecurian.com Dictionary describes a pate' as:

"pâté
[pah-TAY, pa-TAY]
French for "pie," this word — with accent over the "e" — is generally used to refer to various elegant, well-seasoned ground-meat preparations. A pâté can be satiny-smooth and spreadable or, like country pâté, coarsely textured. It can be made from a finely ground or chunky mixture of meats (such as pork, veal, liver or ham), fish, poultry, game, vegetables, etc. Seasonings and fat are usually also included in the mixture, which can be combined before or after cooking. Pâtés may be cooked in a crust, in which case they're referred to as pâté en croûte. They may also be cooked in a pork fat-lined container called a terrine (or any other similarly sized mold), in which case they're called pâté en terrine. Traditional parlance says that when such a mixture is cooked and served in a terrine, the dish is also called a terrine, and when unmolded it becomes a pâté. Today, however, the two terms are often used interchangeably. Pâtés may be hot or cold and are usually served as a first course or appetizer."

My above liste recipe is a bit of a stretch. To make it a true pate', the meat would have to be cut into chunks and mixed together. But you still line the loaf pan, or terrine if you have one, with the pork strips.

In any case, the results can be served hot, or chilled and are great for a main course or appetizers, depending on how they are cut and served.

Hope that helps.

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Old 01-28-2005, 05:31 PM   #10
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Thanks!
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