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Old 09-09-2008, 10:45 PM   #21
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Looks great, maybe more effort to go through than I would care for. But I think the effort/expirimentation is worth the praise!
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Old 09-09-2008, 11:10 PM   #22
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Yes, it's nice to have another way to play around with when the mood strikes. I like reading about this reverse sear.
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Old 09-10-2008, 06:31 AM   #23
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Originally Posted by buzzard767 View Post
I don't know. Like I said, never took the temperature once the ribeye was pulled from the oven. All I know is the result - perfect every time, juicy and very tasty. The salting draws liquid from the meat, but after an hour or so the meat is drier than the salt so the liquid and flavoring is pulled back in. I never was very good at getting it right before I started reverse searing. Now it's a no brainer.

I might add that it is best to use steak that is both good quality and thick.

Edit: In addition to the salt, I also add either pepper or a commercial rub.
Thanks for your responses. I see that you are dry brining as well as using the reverse sear method. I've done dry brining on several occasions with some success. I've never done the reverse sear method...but hope to remedy that situation soon. I was just wondering if I could expect somewhere in the neighborhood of a 30*-45* rise in temperature after only three minutes of total sear time on medium high heat.

Thanks again for you response....

Have Fun & Enjoy!!!
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Old 09-10-2008, 08:31 AM   #24
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I've alwaays been sceptical of dry brining. I really don't want to experiment with salt on $15 steaks. Maybe I'll try a strip one time. Anyone know where that thread was on how to do it here?

UB, just be careful of carryover like IC said. Having the hypodermic style thermometer is a real help.

Sattie, it's not too bad if you think about it. For instance, while the steak was heating in the oven I was preparing the potatoes and mise en place the salad components. You have to baby the meat while it's searing so the more prep the better. When the meat was resting I was finishing off the potatoes and plating.
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Old 09-10-2008, 08:36 AM   #25
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Do not be scared of dry brining. It is a very popular technique that many restaurants use. I would recommend dry dry brining for much longer than an hour though. I like to go 24 hours or so.

Salt will not ruin your steak Jeekinz. It will just make it better.
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Old 09-10-2008, 08:43 AM   #26
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I would recommend dry dry brining for much longer than an hour though. I like to go 24 hours or so.
I think I'll try that this weekend. The longest I've brined so far is only an hour and a half.
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Old 09-10-2008, 08:51 AM   #27
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Buzz try salting it and wrapping it tight in plastic wrap. that will help things along.
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Old 09-10-2008, 09:04 AM   #28
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Buzz try salting it and wrapping it tight in plastic wrap. that will help things along.
I'll do that. Meanwhile, the following is a complimentary bit I just ripped from the web:

Pan-Seared Thick-Cut Steaks
The Problem: Pan-searing a thick-cut steak (a steak almost as thick as it is wide) presents a unique challenge: How to keep the perimeter from overcooking while the very center of the steak reaches the desired temperature.
The Goal:We wanted our steak to have a good crust and medium-rare center, without a wide band of dry, gray meat between the two.
The Solution: We found it was essential to sear the steaks quickly to keep the meat directly under the crust from turning gray. The key was to start with dry meat. We moved the steaks straight from the fridge into a 275-degree oven, which not only warmed them to 95 degrees but also dried the meat thoroughly. At this temperature, when the steak met the hot skillet, it developed a beautiful brown crust in less than four minutes, while the rest of the meat stayed pink, juicy, and tender.
Our steaks spend a long time in a warm oven, yet taste more tender than traditionally prepared steaks, which can be tough and chewy.
The explanation? Meat contains active enzymes called cathepsins, which break down connective tissue over time, increasing tenderness (a fact that is demonstrated to great effect in dry-aging meat). As the temperature of the meat rises, these enzymes work faster and faster until they reach 122 degrees, where all action stops. While our steaks are slowly heating up, the cathepsins are working overtime, in effect “aging” and tenderizing our steaks within half an hour. When our steaks are cooked by conventional methods, thier final temperature is reached much more rapidly, denying the cathepsins the time they need to properly do their jobs
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Old 09-10-2008, 09:23 AM   #29
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Quote:
I've alwaays been sceptical of dry brining. I really don't want to experiment with salt on $15 steaks. Maybe I'll try a strip one time. Anyone know where that thread was on how to do it here?
Try it on flank...London broil method...I personally wouldn't want to use it on better cuts of meat...rib-eys, strips etc.

Quote:
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UB, just be careful of carryover like IC said.
I figure 5* carry over on avg. steaks....10* on roast, and cuts with more mass. Up to 15*+ on large poultry...turkeys etc.
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Old 09-10-2008, 09:34 AM   #30
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I personally wouldn't want to use it on better cuts of meat...rib-eys, strips etc.
Just curious, why would you not want to try it on better cuts? Do you salt your rib-eyes before eating?
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