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Old 09-10-2008, 11:08 AM   #41
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Now I'm more confused than I normally am? How does a better quality cut enhance the affects of dry brining....?
Dry brining is for flavor so if you start with quality then you will end with a more flavorful quality. If you start with a lesser cut then you will have a more flavorful lesser cut.
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Old 09-10-2008, 11:11 AM   #42
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I thought the dry brining was mainly for texture? How salty does it get using kosher salt? I kind of like having the seasoned crust against the unseasoned center of the meat.
It depends, but in general it seasons the meat just right. You can still get your seasoned crust on the outside.
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Old 09-10-2008, 11:51 AM   #43
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Dry brining is for flavor so if you start with quality then you will end with a more flavorful quality. If you start with a lesser cut then you will have a more flavorful lesser cut.
So salt adds flavor to a rib-eye (quality) and to a round steak (lesser quality) equally. Of course the rib-eye would be the better of the two due to more marbling = fat = beef flavor = tenderness.

Yum....off to buy rib-eyes! Since you started this...I'll send you the bill

Have Fun!
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Old 09-10-2008, 12:05 PM   #44
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Take pics.
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Old 09-14-2008, 10:35 AM   #45
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Do not be scared of dry brining. It is a very popular technique that many restaurants use. I would recommend dry dry brining for much longer than an hour though. I like to go 24 hours or so.

Salt will not ruin your steak Jeekinz. It will just make it better.
I tried it. Twenty-four hours on the button. The meat was a large, thick porterhouse instead of the ribeyes I normally use. My wife and I both agreed that the finished project was too salty. I'm going to limit my dry brining to an hour and a half as that has worked for me every single time.
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Old 09-26-2008, 09:29 AM   #46
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I RS some 3/4 - 1" thick ribeyes last night. The oven was set to 200F and the steaks were room temp going in. I removed them pretty much exactly at an internal temp of 100F. Then finished in a pan like I did previously, except used some garlic this time.
;) They came out very tender and medium rare throughout. So it works on thinner, or regular-size cuts as well.

I may try some thick cut pork chops over the weekend.
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Old 09-26-2008, 08:19 PM   #47
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I may try some thick cut pork chops over the weekend.
If you do, please report the results. Thanks.
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Old 09-30-2008, 09:50 AM   #48
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If you do, please report the results. Thanks.
I RS two 1" thick bone-in chops last night. For one, it took a little longer for the meat to come up to temp in the oven. Since I needed a higher final internal temp, I took them out at 110F. Took about 25 minutes, then finished them in a pan.

The final result was "eh". I removed them at 150F and let them rest. The meat was juicy and pretty tender but I can get the same results or better in a pan in less time.
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Old 09-30-2008, 05:01 PM   #49
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Thanks for the response. I'l take a pass on pork for the time being but I do plan on trying RS on boneless chicken breasts.

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Old 09-30-2008, 05:46 PM   #50
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Ill have to try this once.

To answer UBs Q.

A more expensive cut of meat usually has less natural flavor shining threw since it is so tender. So the Tenderloin will greatly benefit from the dry brine as opposed to a skirt that has alot of flavor but is tough.

Its basiclly like this for cuts of beef. (they all have flavor to them)

Tender = not much flavor
Tough = tons of flavor
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