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Old 11-02-2006, 01:04 PM   #11
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I just prepped a pot roast this morning, on my way out the door for work. Here's the strange yet easy combo that went in:
  • 3lb beef for roasting
  • 1 large onion, sliced
  • 5 medium yukon potatoes, cut into approx 1" cubes
  • 3/4 packet dried Ranch Dressing mix
  • 1 can cream of mushroom soup
  • 1/2 to 3/4 cup Coca Cola
I layer the potatoes, then 1/2 of the onions, then the roast, then the dressing, soup and Coke, then some more onions. Set it on low for 8 hours or so and it's actually quite tasty! Can't wait to get home and smell the roast all though my apartment building.
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Old 11-02-2006, 01:35 PM   #12
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Quote:
Originally Posted by lawchick04
I just prepped a pot roast this morning, on my way out the door for work. Here's the strange yet easy combo that went in:
  • 3lb beef for roasting
  • 1 large onion, sliced
  • 5 medium yukon potatoes, cut into approx 1" cubes
  • 3/4 packet dried Ranch Dressing mix
  • 1 can cream of mushroom soup
  • 1/2 to 3/4 cup Coca Cola
I layer the potatoes, then 1/2 of the onions, then the roast, then the dressing, soup and Coke, then some more onions. Set it on low for 8 hours or so and it's actually quite tasty! Can't wait to get home and smell the roast all though my apartment building.
Sounds YUMMY - just copied that!

Actually, I've copied them ALL!!!!!
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Old 11-03-2006, 05:14 AM   #13
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Quote:
Originally Posted by goboenomo
What is A-1?
It's a "steak sauce".
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Old 11-03-2006, 05:37 AM   #14
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Quote:
Originally Posted by cjs
and here's one if he/she feels a little more affluent...
Standing Rib Roast au Jus
One doesn't need to be affluent, you just have to know the butcher

I had a butcher argue with me once when I told him I wanted a bone in standing rib roast. He actually said to me, "No, you want boneless." No, I want bone in. "No, you want boneless." Listen up, chucklehead, I said BONE IN! Sheesh!

I don't care for turkey at all and ham is just so-so in my book, so when the holiday season rolls around I make standing rib roast (a.k.a. "prime rib") from a recipe my mom cut out of the newspaper when I was still a teen. It's so easy even a monkey could do it and it comes out perfectly, every time:

5-7 lb. bone-in standing rib roast
3-4 cloves garlic, cut into slivers
ground thyme
salt & pepper

Preheat oven to 500F. Trim most of the fat from the roast (but not all). Cut small slits all over the top and insert slivers of garlic. Pat salt, pepper and thyme onto the beef. Place the roast, rib-side down, in a roasting pan. Place roast in oven and immediately turn the heat down to375F. Roast for 1 hour. DO NOT OPEN THE OVEN DOOR. (Very Important!)

Turn the oven completely off. Again, do NOT open the oven door. Let the roast stand for 2 hours. Turn the oven on again at 375F. Roast 40 minutes for medium-rare roast, 55 minutes for medium. Remove from oven. Let stand 10 minutes (loosely tented with foil) before slicing. Slice in 1" thick slices using the rib bones at the bottom as a guide. Cut sideways across the bones to release the slices.

NOTE: Save the meaty roasted bones for making beef stock OR, if you're so inclined, you can turn them into beef BBQ'd ribs. Where I live beef BBQ is practically a sacrilege. But we were doing an art show in Houston, TX a couple of years back and a restaurant actually had BBQ Prime Rib on the menu so we gave it a try. Quite tasty! So when I got back home I dug the prime rib bones out of the freezer... you can guess the ending!

Fraidy
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Old 11-03-2006, 05:57 AM   #15
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Quote:
Originally Posted by abjcooking
This is a simple one and easy to make. The sauce will make a gravy when done.

approximately 3 lbs. roast beef
1 package dried onion soup mix
1 can cream of mushroom soup
1/3 cup A-1

Blend ingredients together and pour over roast. Cover and bake at 350 for 2 1/2-3 hours until meat is tender.
Try using beefy-onion soup mix and canned condensed golden mushroom soup instead for a different take on things. I'd limit the A-1 (steak sauce) to a Tablespoonful... just my preference.
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Old 11-03-2006, 06:35 AM   #16
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Cuisine at Home, a magazine, had an excellent recipe for a pot roast using dark beer and pretzels in the mix. I am not a fan of beef pot roasts, but the flavor was outstanding. If you would like the recipe, send me a private message and I will copy and send it to you.
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Old 11-03-2006, 06:39 AM   #17
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Do you want a roast beef that is sliced and rare and delicious or a pot roast that is sliced and well done and delicious? You need entirely different cuts of beef and price commitment.
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Old 11-03-2006, 06:43 AM   #18
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Gretchen
Do you want a roast beef that is sliced and rare and delicious or a pot roast that is sliced and well done and delicious? You need entirely different cuts of beef and price commitment.
If I want a well done roast I simply do a chuck roast, usually slow-cooked. For a truly outstanding rare beef roast I'll pony up the money and buy a standing rib (bone in, as I previously mentioned). It's my choice meal for the holidays since I really don't like turkey and to me ham is more well suited to being diced and added to potatoes au gratin or thinly sliced for ham & cheese sandwiches.

Fraidy
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Old 11-03-2006, 06:43 AM   #19
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You know, we are not flush, and we have roast beef quite rarely, but when we do we buy a good cut and enjoy it. We have it, of course, with a yorkshire pudding or we have beef wellington, which really is one of my very favourite meals. By having the yorksire pud, or the pastry of the weelington, you need less meat to provide a groaningly fillin meal. I substitute fois gras for a pate, and its good, and cheaper (and I don't feel the guilt!).
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Old 11-03-2006, 07:21 AM   #20
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Quote:
Originally Posted by FraidKnot
If I want a well done roast I simply do a chuck roast, usually slow-cooked. For a truly outstanding rare beef roast I'll pony up the money and buy a standing rib (bone in, as I previously mentioned). It's my choice meal for the holidays since I really don't like turkey and to me ham is more well suited to being diced and added to potatoes au gratin or thinly sliced for ham & cheese sandwiches.

Fraidy
The question was really for the original poster and what you posted was my point also. Both kinds of beef "roast" can be delicious but they are quite different animals.
There is pot roast beef and there is roast beef.
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