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Old 03-08-2007, 04:33 AM   #11
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There IS a considerable amount of fat on the outside of the bones.

You can actually see some of it.
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Old 03-08-2007, 06:25 AM   #12
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Quote:
Originally Posted by skilletlicker
Not so sure about that. I thought most of the of the fat was from the fat.

Does anyone know what the nutritional components of bone marrow actually is, or where that information can be obtained online. I have looked, both for marrow and collagen, without success.
I agree that the fat is the fat--and depends on what is on the bones. If they are rib bones, there will be a lot that cooks off. I have seen soup bones with zero meat or fat on them--but marrow inside.
Marrow just cooks?"congeals" inside and can be scooped out--spread on a baguette slice, if nothing else. Even in dishes with liquid around the marrow (osso bucco), it stays inside for the most part--not out.
Unfortunately, you may not WANT to be apprised of the nutrition of marrow--total fat, but SO SO good. Collagen I don't know--but it "melts" (what would be the culinary/chemistry word) at the proper temp, as you know.
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Old 03-08-2007, 07:49 AM   #13
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I would just add a suggestion to pour off accumulated fat when roasting bones for a stock, but to be sure to use the same pan, so you have all that wonderful flavor in your stock.
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Old 03-08-2007, 09:31 AM   #14
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Collagen, when cooked in the presence of water, breaks down into gelatin. Look for the nutrional values of gelatin to get your results.
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Old 03-08-2007, 09:59 AM   #15
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Yeah, the marrow will shrink somewhat, just as if there were a considerable amount of meat on the bones.

I've watched Julia Child in one of her videos The Way to Cook (Soups, Salads and Bread). She dumped the whole contents of the pan into a stock pot, filled the pot with some cold water just above the bones, then she deglazed the pan with some red wine and a little water and added it to the stock.

She skimmed the fat off after the stock was done.
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Old 03-09-2007, 07:44 AM   #16
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yes, deglaze would be a better option.. ;)
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Old 03-09-2007, 07:52 AM   #17
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Corey123
Yeah, the marrow will shrink somewhat, just as if there were a considerable amount of meat on the bones.

I've watched Julia Child in one of her videos The Way to Cook (Soups, Salads and Bread). She dumped the whole contents of the pan into a stock pot, filled the pot with some cold water just above the bones, then she deglazed the pan with some red wine and a little water and added it to the stock.

She skimmed the fat off after the stock was done.
That`s exactly what I`m doing right now also, only I`m using Lamb and used beer instead of wine.
Happily, Lamb, like beef has fat that`s quite solid at room temp, and the fun part is to try and get the entire Fat layer off in one go (I love a challenge)
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Old 03-09-2007, 11:21 AM   #18
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Good luck!

Let us know how you make out.
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Old 03-09-2007, 01:02 PM   #19
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You really need to get the lamb fat out--and the lamb stock may be very "strong". You may want to dilute it with another kind of stock, depending on who is eating the dish you use it in. I have never made lamb stock because I don't think of many uses for it. And I LOVE lamb.
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Old 03-09-2007, 01:14 PM   #20
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well it`s all done now anyway and used in my Scottish version of Lamb stew.
the fat came away all in one as well :)
although I did have to cut it into 4 after to fit in the bowl for propper rendering later.
and yes it is quite strong, but we like it that way.

you can make a Scotch Broth with it, or use it in a Welsh Cawl, or even Irish stew, even in Lamb curries.
I don`t make it often, but I may as well exploit the fact that theres still a LITTLE bit of Winter left over :)
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