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Old 08-10-2019, 05:28 AM   #1
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Sealing the roast

Hi. I have recently got into the Sunday roast. I seal the joint first, however I do remember mum covering it in mustard first. Is their a reason and are their any other things I could try when roasting. I heard of honey before roasting for example.

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Old 08-10-2019, 07:23 AM   #2
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Hi. What do you mean by "seal the roast first"? Are you referring to a beef roast?

Putting mustard on the roast adds flavor to the surface; it doesn't penetrate much but it does add some seasoning. You can also add a spice rub all over the roast. Here are some examples: http://www.clovermeadowsbeef.com/10-best-beef-rubs/

I wouldn't put just honey on a roast. It contains mostly sugar, so it would burn easily. You can mix honey and mustard together and use that.

Hope this helps.
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Old 08-10-2019, 12:46 PM   #3
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otuatail, are you seaLing your roast or seaRing it? If it's the first, I got nothing. However, I do sear meat in the roasting pan on top of the stove. I keep the meat dry and unseasoned. Dry so that it can get a nice crust on it; unseasoned because some herbs and spices can cause me to get a scratchy throat when they get fried. I then season thoroughly before putting it in the oven.

I hope that helps you.
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Old 08-10-2019, 03:53 PM   #4
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otuatail, are you seaLing your roast or seaRing it?
Good point! I didn't think of that. I think you're correct that OP meant to say searing.
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Old 08-10-2019, 06:04 PM   #5
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In the BBQ world, people sometimes use a layer of mustard to get their spice rub to stick, and form a nice crust. It doesn't add anything to the flavor. If you are braising the roast, I can't see any reason for it.

BTW, like CG, I'm guessing you meant searing.

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Old 08-10-2019, 10:14 PM   #6
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A lot of people still believe that searing seals the meat.
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Old 08-11-2019, 12:07 AM   #7
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Okay it is seaRing. So what kind of things can I do with this to add flavor.
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Old 08-11-2019, 12:35 AM   #8
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Okay it is seaRing. So what kind of things can I do with this to add flavor.
It really depends on how you cook the roast after searing. If you are braising the roast, the flavors will come from the sear, and the braising liquid.

Mustard smeared on the meat is probably not going to have a lot of effect on a long, low and slow cook. I would prefer to serve the cooked meat with a little whole grain mustard on the side -- with some crusty bread.

Before you do your sear, salt your meat more than you think it needs, and let it rest in the fridge for a few hours. The salt will sink in, and draw out some water. Salt and pepper before searing also helps build a tasty crust when you sear.

Fresh herbs, especially rosemary and thyme tossed in with the braising liquid are also great for adding flavor. Toss them in whole, and take them out when the roast is done, like you would with bay leaf.

Also, after you do your meat sear, use the same pan to brown any aromatics, like onions and carrots, with the brown bits still in the pan. Those brown bits are full of flavor.

So, basically, season your meat well, let it rest, sear it to a good golden brown, and braise/roast it with plenty of fresh veggies and herbs. My own preference is braising -- the meat gets a good bath in flavors while it cooks.

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Old 08-11-2019, 07:44 AM   #9
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otuatail, Casey's directions for braising assume that you have a chuck roast, which has to be cooked low and slow in order to render the large amount of fat and connective tissue it contains. If you have a sirloin or round roast, though, you will need to cook it more quickly at a higher temperature. Which kind do you have?
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Old 08-11-2019, 07:48 AM   #10
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Mustard smeared on the meat is probably not going to have a lot of effect on a long, low and slow cook.
I think it might. My mom used to make New England pot roast when I was growing up. You brush a thick layer of horseradish sauce on the meat before cooking. It mellows a lot and flavors the roast as it breaks down during cooking. Mustard could have a similar effect.
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