"Discover Cooking, Discuss Life."

Go Back   Discuss Cooking - Cooking Forums > Recipes & Ingredients > Beef, Pork, Lamb & Venison > Beef
Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
 
Old 03-29-2009, 07:19 PM   #1
Assistant Cook
 
Join Date: Sep 2008
Posts: 26
Searing beef

Hi everyone,
Ok, the last time I seared beef was for my beef stew dish. I cooked it twice already! But now I have a question about searing the meat. I have a small all clad skillet that I seared the meat in.

But, because my skillet wasn't too big I had to do it in about three batches. As I got to the third batch I noticed that the meat was getting blacker and blacker even though I cooked it for the same amount of time and the skillet did seem a little dry (like there was no more oil). Then I started thinking, I haven't been putting more cooking oil in between batches and left over scrapes were still in the skillet between the batches too making the bottom of the skillet blacker and blacker as well.

Should I have been adding more cooking oil and/or should I have cleaned the skillet between batches? I've heard you shouldn't add oil to a very hot pan so someone enlighten me! Thats for your advice in advance!

__________________

__________________
marvinq is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-29-2009, 07:33 PM   #2
Head Chef
 
Join Date: Dec 2008
Posts: 2,300
I would add a little oil each time. I try to keep the pan hot, but not too hot so as to burn. Is your beef floured? Sometimes I've done this and the flour burns by the time I've gotten to the last batch. It's good to have brown bits to scrape up for the sauce, but not black! (In my experience)
__________________

__________________

Wyogal is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-29-2009, 08:27 PM   #3
Certified Pretend Chef
 
Andy M.'s Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2004
Location: Massachusetts
Posts: 41,362
It's perfectly acceptable to add oil to a hot pan. As a matter of fact, it's preferred.

The oil is key to the searing process as it acts to transmit heat from the pan to the meat more efficiently.

I do not flour meat for stews and braises because the flour can burn.

After searing the three batches of meat, you should deglaze the skillet with some of the liquid that is going into the stew so you can save all the flavor stuck to the bottom of the pan.

Also, if you are using a dutch oven, consider searing the meat there instead. Saves cleaning another pan and the deglazing process.
__________________
"If you want to make an apple pie from scratch, you must first create the universe." -Carl Sagan
Andy M. is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-29-2009, 09:45 PM   #4
Assistant Cook
 
Join Date: Sep 2008
Posts: 26
I've never fully understood why you should add flour to the meat when your searing it. I've always thought it would just burn off. I just added the flour to the stock directly. But then I'm a total beginner when it comes to cooking. So don't take my word for it.
__________________
marvinq is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-29-2009, 09:52 PM   #5
Head Chef
 
Join Date: Dec 2008
Posts: 2,300
I don't do that anymore because of it burning. I think folks do it so it creates a bit of a crust on the meat, or helps to thicken the sauce like a roux. Now, I just brown the meat "naked." (haha, the MEAT is naked, wait, that sounds even worse...)
__________________

Wyogal is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-30-2009, 11:52 AM   #6
Master Chef
 
jennyema's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2002
Location: Boston
Posts: 9,257
Quote:
Originally Posted by marvinq View Post
I've never fully understood why you should add flour to the meat when your searing it. I've always thought it would just burn off. I just added the flour to the stock directly. But then I'm a total beginner when it comes to cooking. So don't take my word for it.
You're right.

When you flour meat before you sear it, you sear the flour and not the meat, which defeates the purpose.
__________________

__________________
Less is not more. More is more and more is fabulous.
jennyema is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Tags
None

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off



» Discuss Cooking on Facebook

Our Communities

Our communities encompass many different hobbies and interests, but each one is built on friendly, intelligent membership.

» More about our Communities

Automotive Communities

Our Automotive communities encompass many different makes and models. From U.S. domestics to European Saloons.

» More about our Automotive Communities

Marine Communities

Our Marine websites focus on Cruising and Sailing Vessels, including forums and the largest cruising Wiki project on the web today.

» More about our Marine Communities


Copyright 2002- Social Knowledge, LLC All Rights Reserved.

All times are GMT -5. The time now is 05:45 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 4
Copyright ©2000 - 2016, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.