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Old 03-11-2007, 06:12 PM   #11
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Wow, thanks folks.

I was thinking about sliced corned beef on pumpernickel with some very, non-Irish, sauerkraut, and some cheese on top. Would then heat the sandwich in the oven or nuker until the cheese melted.

A bit of Russian dressing on top and served with a very kosher pickle and some cole slaw.

Oops, sorry, that is my love for kosher deli coming through.

This definitely has to be an Erin Go Braugh menu. And I know I cannot convince my folks that a Reuben is Irish.

Sigh, sigh, and triple sigh.

Thanks to you all. Gotta think about this some more.
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Old 03-12-2007, 12:13 AM   #12
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auntdot, you could roast your corned beef, after boiling with spices, with a glaze or mustard topping for a change of pace.

you must still have boiled cabbage and 2 veg, though.

and if you're game, try sharp cheddar on rustic wheat crackers, with raw onions and spicy brown mustard as an appetizer.

expatgirl, corned beef, or rather a beef brisket with pickling spices, are boiled in a large pot with cabbage and potatoes. it is a traditional irish-american dish, attempting to recreate a common irish national dish of boiled "bacon", which is more like a ham (don't ask. lots of confusion with cuts and preperations of pork, and their associated names around the world), and the same veggies.
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Old 03-12-2007, 02:31 AM   #13
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Quote:
Originally Posted by expatgirl
Not to sound ignorant but just what is "corned beef"---I guess I could go and Google this question and get all kinds of "scientific" answers but I'd really like to know what you DC readers have to say about it. If this question belongs on another thread please zap it there--is this a traditional Irish dish? Your menu sounds delish, by the way, Katie E!
"Corned Beef" is a beef brisket that is salt cured (that's the "corn" from the Olde English term for grain ... which ment grains of something, like grains of salt or sand- not limited to what we think of as cereal grains such as wheat, oats, etc.) and sometimes spices.

I agree with BuckyTom ... from what I have been able to find in researching ... what American's consider to be the "traditional" St. Paddy's day feast is really a "New England Boiled Dinner" consisting of boiled corned beef, onions, carrots, potatoes and cabbage. Roast lamb with potatoes, onions, carrots and cabbage, or a lamb stew - or a boiled piece of pork (similar to Canadian Bacon) with similar vegetables - or even Colcannon ... any of these served with a heavy and hearty soda bread, with butter, seems to be much more "authentic".

When our Irish ancestors came to America, they had to make do with what they could find ... corned beef was more available than good lamb ... so the tradition shifted from the traditional in the old country to what was available in the new country.

I'll probably stick with tradition and continue to perpetuate the "Irish-American" myth of corned beef with onions, carrots, potatoes and cabbage - and a hearty loaf of soda bread.
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Old 03-12-2007, 08:02 AM   #14
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katie, here's a wonderful cheesecake -

CHOCOLATE-GLAZED IRISH CREAM CHEESECAKE
Recipe By :2003 APPRENTICESHIP DINNER

CRUST:
6 each graham crackers
1/4 cup unsalted butter, melted

FILLING:
1 1/2 pounds cream cheese, room temp
7 Tbsps sugar
1 tablespoon all-purpose flour
2 large eggs
6 Tbsps Irish cream liqueur
6 Tbsps sour cream
1 tsp vanilla extract

GLAZE:
1/2 cup whipping cream
9 ozs good-quality semisweet chocolate, chopped
GARNISH:
1 oz white chocolate curls (estimated qty)
raspberries for garnish (~2-3)
sprig mint for garnish

CRUST:
1. Oven to 350°
2. Finely grind graham cracker; add butter & blend till combined.
3. Press crust mixture into bottom (NOT SIDES) of a 9" springform pan.
4. Bake crust till golden brown, ~8 min.

FILLING:
1. Using an elect. mixer, beat cream cheese & sugar till smooth. Add flour, then the eggs, one at a time, beating till just combined.
2. Add remaining ingredients.
3. Pour filling into the pan & bake for 10 min. at 350°.
4. Reduce oven temp. to 250° and continue baking till set, ~40 min. longer.
5. Cool. Cover & chill in refrigerator overnight.

GLAZE:
1. Bring cream to a simmer; remove from heat & add chopped chocolate.
2. Stir till melted.
3. Cool till glaze is lukewarm.

COMPLETING:
1. Once cheesecake is chilled, remove the sides of the springform pan & place the cake on a rack set over a b. sheet.
2. Pour glaze over the cheesecake, spreading w/offset spatula to cover top and sides; allow excess to drip onto the sheet.
3. Let glaze set before serving.

GARNISH:
Place slice of cheesecake back of plate, top w/white chocolate curls. On either side, place 3 berries and a mint sprig.
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Old 03-12-2007, 02:12 PM   #15
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Cornbeef

I'm trying the cornbeef recipe with apple juice instead of the beer and cooks for 12 hours in the slow cooker will see how this turns out.

Have a great day !!!!
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Old 03-12-2007, 02:47 PM   #16
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I also love corned beef and am serving that. It is delishious and so tender when cooked right. What could be better than fresh green cabbage and beautiful potatoes? Do them proudly with fresh Irish butter and chopped herbs (parsley and a little thyme or marjoram). Certainly cook them in the pot with the broth for flavor, but run them under the broiler or in a sautee pan for a finsih with the butter and sprinkle herbs at the end. Take it further with organic carrots still with their stems, and if you like them young turnips, tender and zippy! Have a horseraddish sauce and other accoutrements (dish of sel gris for example, and put the whole bounty on a great platter.) Serve a great stout or porter with the meal and maybe some Irish soda bread. If someone really cannot stomach corned beef, have a few sausages available. There are all kinds for every taste, even vegan ones! But this simple meal can be made extraordinary! Celebrate!
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Old 03-12-2007, 02:51 PM   #17
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Well, since I absolutely hate, hate, HATE boiled cabbage, I NEVER make it that way. Instead I roughly shred/chop it & saute it in an obscene amount of butter, along with some salt & freshly ground black pepper, until it's just crisp/tender. Absolutely delicious - even with leftovers the next day.

And for those who don't eat corned beef - like my husband - I make turkey kielbasa which I serve with the same sides (the sauteed cabbage, buttered carrots, turnips, & potatoes, plus the usual condiments of good mustard & horseradish).
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Old 03-12-2007, 03:22 PM   #18
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I'll be working out of town on St. Patties day, so I'll be eating whatever "Irish" meal that the Portugese restraunt down the street from the hotel is serving that night
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Old 03-12-2007, 04:10 PM   #19
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Quote:
Originally Posted by cjs
katie, here's a wonderful cheesecake -

CHOCOLATE-GLAZED IRISH CREAM CHEESECAKE
Recipe By :2003 APPRENTICESHIP DINNER

CRUST:
6 each graham crackers
1/4 cup unsalted butter, melted

FILLING:
1 1/2 pounds cream cheese, room temp
7 Tbsps sugar
1 tablespoon all-purpose flour
2 large eggs
6 Tbsps Irish cream liqueur
6 Tbsps sour cream
1 tsp vanilla extract

GLAZE:
1/2 cup whipping cream
9 ozs good-quality semisweet chocolate, chopped
GARNISH:
1 oz white chocolate curls (estimated qty)
raspberries for garnish (~2-3)
sprig mint for garnish

CRUST:
1. Oven to 350
2. Finely grind graham cracker; add butter & blend till combined.
3. Press crust mixture into bottom (NOT SIDES) of a 9" springform pan.
4. Bake crust till golden brown, ~8 min.

FILLING:
1. Using an elect. mixer, beat cream cheese & sugar till smooth. Add flour, then the eggs, one at a time, beating till just combined.
2. Add remaining ingredients.
3. Pour filling into the pan & bake for 10 min. at 350.
4. Reduce oven temp. to 250 and continue baking till set, ~40 min. longer.
5. Cool. Cover & chill in refrigerator overnight.

GLAZE:
1. Bring cream to a simmer; remove from heat & add chopped chocolate.
2. Stir till melted.
3. Cool till glaze is lukewarm.

COMPLETING:
1. Once cheesecake is chilled, remove the sides of the springform pan & place the cake on a rack set over a b. sheet.
2. Pour glaze over the cheesecake, spreading w/offset spatula to cover top and sides; allow excess to drip onto the sheet.
3. Let glaze set before serving.

GARNISH:
Place slice of cheesecake back of plate, top w/white chocolate curls. On either side, place 3 berries and a mint sprig.
Wow, cjs! Thanks. It sounds wonderful. What's not to like?
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Old 03-13-2007, 08:38 AM   #20
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It's wonderful!
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