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Old 08-01-2012, 11:35 AM   #21
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From Wikipedia, "Bordelaise sauce is a classic French sauce named after the Bordeaux region of France, which is famous for its wine. The sauce is made with dry red wine, bone marrow, butter, shallots and sauce demi-glace." Bordelaise sauce - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

So, before I can make the Bordelaise sauce, I have to make the demi-glace and I have to find some bone marrow.

That's many hours of prep before even starting on the recipe.

I am very finicky about what kind of bottled sauce I am willing to use. Worcestershire was the first bottled sauce I was willing to buy, after looking at the ingredients. Even Julia Child used Worcestershire.

Margi, if you have a simpler recipe for Bordelaise sauce, I would love to have it.
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Old 08-01-2012, 11:40 AM   #22
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Quote:
Originally Posted by taxlady View Post
From Wikipedia, "Bordelaise sauce is a classic French sauce named after the Bordeaux region of France, which is famous for its wine. The sauce is made with dry red wine, bone marrow, butter, shallots and sauce demi-glace." Bordelaise sauce - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

So, before I can make the Bordelaise sauce, I have to make the demi-glace and I have to find some bone marrow.

That's many hours of prep before even starting on the recipe.

I am very finicky about what kind of bottled sauce I am willing to use. Worcestershire was the first bottled sauce I was willing to buy, after looking at the ingredients. Even Julia Child used Worcestershire.

Margi, if you have a simpler recipe for Bordelaise sauce, I would love to have it.
and all that kerfuffle for 3oz's tax? every individuals choice but,me,i'd stick to ramsays recipe & the "wooster"
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Old 08-01-2012, 12:17 PM   #23
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Tax Lady: If you are patient, next week

Linda,

We are going on an epicurian escape via Ferry to Corfu, 60 km. from Puglia for 4 days 3 nights, to celebrate the Vet´s birthday.

We shall be home Tuesday mid morning.

Have had a tough couple of weeks, living with reforms of the two bathrms, the kitch, the dining room, the electrical system and the installation of new kitch appliances.

I have to look for the red wine sauce for the Steak Diane, and to be honest, I like Gordon Ramsey´s cream sauce ... I watched the DVD, Bolas sent and it looks lovely. The big thing with me is the Cream ... I prefer the red wine sauce. I like Worcestshire sauce, as if I am correct, it has no Soy, which I am terribly allergic to Soy and go nowhere near it in any form. It almost killed me.

I know my Mom included it in her hand written book ...

Kind regards, and I shall make myself a note to do.

Ciao, Have a lovely August.
Margaux.
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Old 08-01-2012, 02:00 PM   #24
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www.saveur.com & www.aboutfrenchfood.com

Tax Lady,

After looking at Gordon Ramsey´s DVD, that Bolas had sent to the thread, and after reading Saveur Magazine and looking at the About French Food Forum in English; I would go with Ramsey´s recipe ...

The basic Bordelaise sauce is: shallot finely chopped, Bordeaux Red wine, beef stock, butter, thyme herb and salt & freshly ground black pepper.

Bone marrow is a bit complicated for a " casual " dinner ... a great beef stock and the correct red wine with the shallot would work, or Ramsey´s.

Thanks,
Margi.
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Old 08-01-2012, 02:28 PM   #25
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Originally Posted by Margi Cintrano View Post
Tax Lady,

After looking at Gordon Ramsey´s DVD, that Bolas had sent to the thread, and after reading Saveur Magazine and looking at the About French Food Forum in English; I would go with Ramsey´s recipe ...

The basic Bordelaise sauce is: shallot finely chopped, Bordeaux Red wine, beef stock, butter, thyme herb and salt & freshly ground black pepper.

Bone marrow is a bit complicated for a " casual " dinner ... a great beef stock and the correct red wine with the shallot would work, or Ramsey´s.

Thanks,
Margi.
Thank you. I assume that the sauce should be reduced a bit?

I will give that a try. I found the Worcestershire a bit strong, or maybe I just put too much.

I really like to cook without using store-bought sauce. This will only really be a "from scratch" recipe if I make my own wine. I guess I would have to use Dijon mustard powder. Oh, and I doubt I will ever make my own brandy.
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Old 08-02-2012, 06:24 AM   #26
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Bordelaise Sauce with Photo

Tax Lady,

Below, as promised, here is my Mom´s recipe for the Bordelaise Sauce with a photo (top photo)

Preparation: 10 minutes

Time of Concoction: 20 minutes

*** OPTIONAL: 300 grams of veal or beef bones in 10 centimetre pieces

*** RECIPE ...

4 Shallots minced finely
6 black peppercorns
2 swigs of fresh thyme herb
1/2 Bay Leaf ( trim in half )
400 ml. French Bordeaux Red Wine
400 ml. Beef or Veal Stock Home made
room temperature: 15 grams French creamy style butter

*** 1. simmer the bones in stock pot ( this step is optional )
2. sauté the shallots in butter with the peppercorns, thyme swigs and the half of Bay Leaf on simmer for 3 minutes
3. then add the beef or veal stock & stir with wooden spoon on simmer low flame 10 minutes and reduce the sauce to 250 ml.
4. salt and pepper to your taste, and simmer with more butter and combine with an electric mixer until the sauce is well blended and drizzle the sauce on the filet mignon and serve.

Tax Lady: kind regards and have a lovely summer,
Margaux Cintrano

*** see top foto.
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Old 08-02-2012, 12:26 PM   #27
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Thanks Margi, I'll give that a try. I have copied and pasted the recipe.
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Old 08-18-2012, 07:08 PM   #28
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That recipe looks lovely, thanks Margi
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Steak Diane :chef: Buon Giorno, Ladies & Gents, Steak Diane, is quite an heirloom ... My Swiss French Mom Eva used to prepare this elegant dish many many years ago ... Here is her recipe: :yum: STEAK DIANE FOR TWO ... 2 FILET MIGNON ( 4 OZ. EACH ) 1 1/2 OZ. CLARIFIED BUTTER 1 TSP. DIJON MUSTARD 2 MUSHROOMS OF CHOICE SLICED 1 TSP. SHALLOTS MINCED 1/4 TSP. GARLIC MINCED 1/2 OF A LEMON: JUICE 1 TSP. FRESH PARSLEY 1 OZ. BRANDY 3 OZ. BORDELAISE SAUCE 1 OZ. HEAVY CREAM *** CLARIFIED BUTTER ... :yum: butter that has been melted and chilled ... the solid is then lifted away from the liquid and discarded ... clarification raises the smoke point of butter ... clarified butter will stay fresh in refrigerator longer ... 1. Pound each filet to 1/2 inch thickness 2. heat pan to medium high and add butter 3. season steak with dijon mustard and place in pan 4. add mushrooms, shallots, and garlic to pan keeping separate from steaks 5. after 2 mins, turn steaks over 6. squeeze lemon and add parsley to mushrooms 7. add brandy and flambée 8. add sauce and the cream and let reduce 9. remove the steaks from pan 10. spoon sauce and mushrooms over the steaks *** Serve with a wonderful Red wine or Cava Rosé and crusty French style Baguette ... Enjoy, Margaux Cintrano. :wink: 3 stars 1 reviews
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