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Old 07-25-2012, 11:28 AM   #11
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London Broil is not a cut of beef.

It is a method of preparation for a tough cut of meat, usually round steak or flank steak. It's marinated, grilled or broiled till just mid-rare and then sliced thinly against the grain.

Therein lies the problem: whatever your store is selling you is a tough piece of meat before you cook it.

The easiest thing to do is buy a more tender cut of beef.

But all the other suggestions are good ones.
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Old 07-25-2012, 12:09 PM   #12
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I don't where you get your meat, but here in MN you can walk in the store and ask for London Broil and they will give you a piece of meat.
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Old 07-25-2012, 12:11 PM   #13
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Quote:
Originally Posted by CharlieD View Post
I guess the London Broil is the main problem here. I do not think it is a good part of meat to use for stir fying. Plus, of course all the sugestions above.
Quote:
Originally Posted by jennyema View Post
London Broil is not a cut of beef.

It is a method of preparation for a tough cut of meat, usually round steak or flank steak. It's marinated, grilled or broiled till just mid-rare and then sliced thinly against the grain.

Therein lies the problem: whatever your store is selling you is a tough piece of meat before you cook it.

The easiest thing to do is buy a more tender cut of beef.

But all the other suggestions are good ones.
ah hah,so that's london broil.i thought that was what you guy's call sirloin or rump.charlie & jenny both on the money.wouldn't use that cut for s/fry in the first place.but as charlie said,all the other advice still applies.
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Old 07-25-2012, 12:12 PM   #14
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This is from Wiki:
"
Many American butchers will label a cut of meat "London broil". This is confusing as the term does not refer to a specific cut of meat, but a method of preparation and cookery. The cut of meat traditionally used is flank steak, but in recent years butchers have erroneously labeled top round steak/roast as London Broil. Because the muscle fibers run the entire length of this cut, the meat can be tough if not tenderized via pounding or massaging. Scoring, stabbing, cutting, penetrating, or otherwise mutilating the cut before sending it into the broiler results in a tougher finished product as it allows all the desirable juices to run out of the meat into the pan."

So maybe the O.P. got him self a tough piece of meat.
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Old 07-25-2012, 12:15 PM   #15
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Originally Posted by CharlieD View Post
This is from Wiki:
"
Many American butchers will label a cut of meat "London broil". This is confusing as the term does not refer to a specific cut of meat, but a method of preparation and cookery. The cut of meat traditionally used is flank steak, but in recent years butchers have erroneously labeled top round steak/roast as London Broil. Because the muscle fibers run the entire length of this cut, the meat can be tough if not tenderized via pounding or massaging. Scoring, stabbing, cutting, penetrating, or otherwise mutilating the cut before sending it into the broiler results in a tougher finished product as it allows all the desirable juices to run out of the meat into the pan."

So maybe the O.P. got him self a tough piece of meat.
kinda looks that way charlie!!
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Old 07-25-2012, 12:19 PM   #16
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I use flank steak (cut as I described in my post above) for stir-fry all the time and it's tender because of the way I slice it and marinate it in Dark Soy Sauce, Cornstarch, Chinese Rice Wine, Salt, Sugar, Peanut Oil, Garlic, Ginger. You can add or sub other flavors to suit your dish.
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Old 07-25-2012, 12:19 PM   #17
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As I suggested in post #2, the OP should consider a more tender cut of beef if cutting it cross grain and reducing cooking time to minimum does not give satisfactory results.

I too would not pick a London Broil for stir fry, but rather would choose a cooking method for the LB with long cooking time that would be able to break down and tenderize this rather tough cut of meat.

Flank steak can be tough too but although it's not my favorite stir fry meat selection it can be made to work in stir fries provided it is cut cross grain and sufficiently thin and is not over-cooked.
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Old 07-25-2012, 12:30 PM   #18
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This all reminds me of when I was in college, and made stirfry for a friend. I had no clue as to what meat to use, got what I thought was a decent piece of beef. I cooked it all up, and it looked very nice. However, I noticed my friend was carefully picking out the meat and setting it aside. It too was tough as shoe leather.
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Old 07-25-2012, 01:06 PM   #19
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Quote:
Originally Posted by CharlieD View Post
This is from Wiki:
"
Many American butchers will label a cut of meat "London broil". This is confusing as the term does not refer to a specific cut of meat, but a method of preparation and cookery. The cut of meat traditionally used is flank steak, but in recent years butchers have erroneously labeled top round steak/roast as London Broil. Because the muscle fibers run the entire length of this cut, the meat can be tough if not tenderized via pounding or massaging. Scoring, stabbing, cutting, penetrating, or otherwise mutilating the cut before sending it into the broiler results in a tougher finished product as it allows all the desirable juices to run out of the meat into the pan."

So maybe the O.P. got him self a tough piece of meat.

That's exactly what I just said above.
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Old 07-25-2012, 02:26 PM   #20
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Originally Posted by Greg Who Cooks View Post
As I suggested in post #2, the OP should consider a more tender cut of beef if cutting it cross grain and reducing cooking time to minimum does not give satisfactory results.

I too would not pick a London Broil for stir fry, but rather would choose a cooking method for the LB with long cooking time that would be able to break down and tenderize this rather tough cut of meat.

Flank steak can be tough too but although it's not my favorite stir fry meat selection it can be made to work in stir fries provided it is cut cross grain and sufficiently thin and is not over-cooked.
+1 on both Greg. Flank is not the best candidate. Whenever stir-frying, slice as thinly as possible & get the oil/pan hot enough. Push the beef around (stir-fry), & do it quickly. Push it or set it aside, and then add your veggies.
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