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Old 09-05-2012, 08:57 PM   #21
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I love Coleman's. As far as wine paring and cooking, I strongly believe in using wine you like and not necessary the wine recommended in recipe. I know people will disagree with me, but I just couldn't stand the taste of wine i a dish, if I do not like the wine it self.
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Old 09-05-2012, 09:10 PM   #22
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Originally Posted by CharlieD
I love Coleman's. As far as wine paring and cooking, I strongly believe in using wine you like and not necessary the wine recommended in recipe. I know people will disagree with me, but I just couldn't stand the taste of wine i a dish, if I do not like the wine it self.
I totally agree, I would never use a wine I disliked for cooking. I do love to cook with vermouth and sherry, which are also highly drinkable, IMHO.

Will have to check out Coleman's.
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Old 09-06-2012, 11:46 AM   #23
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Quote:
Originally Posted by CharlieD View Post
I love Coleman's. As far as wine paring and cooking, I strongly believe in using wine you like and not necessary the wine recommended in recipe. I know people will disagree with me, but I just couldn't stand the taste of wine i a dish, if I do not like the wine it self.
I agree completely, Charlie.

The only other caveat I will throw out is that when cooking with red wine, be aware that the color may also come out in the final dish. For example, if you use red wine in stroganoff and then add sour cream, you may end up with pink stroganoff. For this reason, I almost always use white wine when cooking (unless the recipe specifically calls for red, e.g. boeuf bourguignon)

However, if you do use red wine, the color will usually subside and turn brown after being cooked for a period of time.
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Old 09-06-2012, 11:55 AM   #24
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Coleman's also make ready to use mustard. I fyou like hot mustard they are number one. Hottttt and yummy.
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Old 09-06-2012, 12:27 PM   #25
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I look to the preparation rather than the ingredients when selecting a wine for use in the preparation and for serving at the table. In the case of Stroganoff, any red will color the dish to a dull brown, and most reds would be too acid for my taste.

One pairing of a mid priced wine IMO would be Kim Coleman Sav Blanc, another would be an oaky chardonnay.
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Old 09-06-2012, 06:18 PM   #26
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...and most reds would be too acid for my taste.
That's surprising, considering that white wines normally have quite a bit more acidity than reds. Reds are usually put through a secondary fermentation that lowers the overall acidity, while whites, with the exception of Chardonnay, are not. Could it be the tannins that you're tasting?
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Old 09-06-2012, 08:40 PM   #27
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That's surprising, considering that white wines normally have quite a bit more acidity than reds. Reds are usually put through a secondary fermentation that lowers the overall acidity, while whites, with the exception of Chardonnay, are not. Could it be the tannins that you're tasting?
I think you are correct. Tannins it is.
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Old 09-06-2012, 09:03 PM   #28
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I look to the preparation rather than the ingredients when selecting a wine for use in the preparation and for serving at the table. In the case of Stroganoff, any red will color the dish to a dull brown, and most reds would be too acid for my taste.

One pairing of a mid priced wine IMO would be Kim Coleman Sav Blanc, another would be an oaky chardonnay.
Error number 2, the wine I would pair would be Kim Crawford, not Kim Coleman.

Not my best day for posting.
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