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Old 08-12-2012, 04:21 PM   #51
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Why is it that people think that Omaha Steaks are any better grade than what you can get in your average supermarket. The company doesn't even make any claim that their meat is better grade, only that it's "gourmet quality." What the heck does that mean? That sounds pretty subjective, if you ask me.

What the company has actually done is marketed the phrase "grain fed beef" so that it sounds like something that's vastly superior to other products. Well, guess what? ALL of the beef your grocer sells is grain fed, unless specifically labeled otherwise. I just don't see the point of paying $20/lb for sirloin steak.

Me... I'll take grass fed beef any day of the week.
If you ever tried it, the difference between Omaha Steaks meat and grocery store meat would jump up and punch you right square in the face! For one thing, all their beef is USDA choice or better, and it is aged, while supermarket beef is neither.

Also, if you buy meat at the supermarket and you don't like it, for any reason, would they refund your money, plus transportation charges incurred to return it? Any time I've had a complaint with Omaha Steaks products, whether it was faulty in some way or just because I didn't enjoy it, they immediately refunded my money plus the portion of the shipping charges for that product(s).
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Old 08-12-2012, 04:30 PM   #52
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Corn Fed cattle is not the greatest beef in the world. Corn is not a natural food for cattle. It messes up the digestive system beyond repair. The only reason the herds are sent to feed lots is because the corn puts the weight on them faster than if they were allowed to stay out on the range and eat just grass.

When the herd is brought to the feed lot, they won't touch the corn for three or four days. Then they get so hungry that they eat it. Some feed lots will feed them mixed hay with corn when they first arrive. Then they gradually reduce the hay and feed them only corn. I know the cattlemen are selling off their herds due to the corn shortage. They are losing a lot of money due to the fact that the cattle being underweight because they are headed for the feed lots earlier than normal. The cattlemen get paid by the weight of the total load minus the weight of the cattle box. But hopefully, they will allow the herds to stay out on the range and sell them the old fashion way. When they are ready and not artificially fattened.

Each pen of cattle are dated on arrival. The cattle will die from digestive problems after so many weeks of eating just corn. They are headed for the slaughter house just about a week before they will start dropping in the pen. Grain is not the normal feed for cattle. Grass is.
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Old 08-12-2012, 06:22 PM   #53
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If you ever tried it, the difference between Omaha Steaks meat and grocery store meat would jump up and punch you right square in the face! For one thing, all their beef is USDA choice or better, and it is aged, while supermarket beef is neither.
AFAIK most supermarkets sell USDA select grade. I've seen USDA choice at a few supermarkets, Gelson's for one, probably WFM. What I recall from Gelson's is that the choice steaks cost about twice the price of the other supermarkets' select steaks.

It's funny I thought the USDA grade had to be labeled on the product but I just looked at a Trader Joe's rib eye steak and there is no grade indication at all. I've had these steaks before and they're fine but not exceptional, so I suspect they're select. Perhaps there's an understanding that meat is select if not stamped otherwise.

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Corn Fed cattle is not the greatest beef in the world. Corn is not a natural food for cattle. It messes up the digestive system beyond repair. The only reason the herds are sent to feed lots is because the corn puts the weight on them faster than if they were allowed to stay out on the range and eat just grass.
It appears that corn is the bovine version of HFCS.
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Old 08-12-2012, 06:29 PM   #54
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For one thing, all their beef is USDA choice or better, and it is aged, while supermarket beef is neither.
It's your money, spend it like you want.
According to the USDA, meat inspection is mandatory, but grading is voluntary.
As is the case with most flat statements, it is generally not that simple; regardless of what a vendor claims....many markets do carry USDA choice beef, even way out here in the sticks.
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Old 08-12-2012, 06:30 PM   #55
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My 'go to' supermarket sells both Select and Choice grades. Each is clearly marked on individual package labels. The choice grade is a buck or two higher per pound.

Costco sells choice and prime. The prime is $5-$7 per pound more. All packages are clearly marked.

None of the prices are near what Omaha charges for its beef.
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Old 08-12-2012, 06:39 PM   #56
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Colorado has good grass fed beef. I think it's called Ranchers Choice or something like that. Yes it's more expensive, and yes, its better.
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Old 08-12-2012, 06:42 PM   #57
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I have had very good, inexpensive steak, and very bad, expensive steak. Lots of times you can't be sure until you take your first bite....
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Old 08-12-2012, 06:49 PM   #58
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I have had very good, inexpensive steak, and very bad, expensive steak. Lots of times you can't be sure until you take your first bite....
So true!
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Old 08-12-2012, 10:27 PM   #59
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Colorado has good grass fed beef. I think it's called Ranchers Choice or something like that. Yes it's more expensive, and yes, its better.
I love the grass fed stuff. We buy 50 lbs of it twice a year and it's pretty much the only beef we eat, unless dining out somewhere. I find that GFB has a completely different flavor and texture. Part of that comes from the fact that the animals are much older when slaughtered compared to grain fed. The meat is leaner and stronger flavored. Because it's leaner, it can also be easier to overcook.

Now getting back to the original topic of portions, below is the portion size of steak I normally eat - in fact this was tonight's dinner. This is 4 ounces of grass-fed tenderloin. DW and I usually split an 8-ounce cut. The American Heart Association actually recommends a 2-3 ounce portion, so 4 ounces is pigging out a little. Yeah, I realize it probably looks like a mere nibble compared to the 72-ounce steak mentioned earlier in the thread, but I just cut it into a lot of very small pieces and savor each morsel.

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Old 08-12-2012, 10:36 PM   #60
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Steve Kroll
I love the grass fed stuff. We buy 50 lbs of it twice a year and it's pretty much the only beef we eat, unless dining out somewhere. I find that GFB has a completely different flavor and texture. Part of that comes from the fact that the animals are much older when slaughtered compared to grain fed. The meat is leaner and stronger flavored. Because it's leaner, it can also be easier to overcook.

Now getting back to the original topic of portions, below is the portion size of steak I normally eat - in fact this was tonight's dinner. This is 4 ounces of grass-fed tenderloin. DW and I usually split an 8-ounce cut. The American Heart Association actually recommends a 2-3 ounce portion, so 4 ounces is pigging out a little. Yeah, I realize it probably looks like a mere nibble compared to the 72-ounce steak mentioned earlier in the thread, but I just cut it into a lot of very small pieces and savor each morsel.
Yummy! That veggie mix looks great!! Is that feta?
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This steak is too darned big!!! Rib eye is about my favorite beef cut (although I'm thrilled when I have enough guests to cook prime rib roast). I was in a supermarket today and saw some nice looking rib eye steaks (bone-in), but they were 1-1/2 pounds! (24 oz., 0.7 Kg) That's just too big!!! It's too much of a serving for one person, and when I'm entertaining guest(s) I like to serve everybody the same entree. Many of the most popular cuts can't be cut in half and yield identical servings. A nutritionist would probably tell you to eat no more than 6 oz. (maybe even 4 oz. but scoff, scoff...). "No bigger than the palm of your hand." Yeah, right, maybe if it's three inches thick. (The steak, not my palm!) :wink: Filet mignon is not my favorite cut because they're too lean, not enough marbling, but at least you can find them in the 6-8 oz. size. IMO that's a reasonable protein serving. When faced with these Frankensteaks I just have a problem leaving some on the plate. I'm on a seafood diet. When I see it I eat it. :wink: A good solution to this is to serve a reasonable size, maybe even a large reasonable size (12 oz.?) and when it's gone there isn't any more unless you want to drive back to the supermarket. (That's a good disincentive to over eat.) But steaks seldom come in this size. If anything I've seen a trend to larger and larger steaks.) One good strategy to serving healthful food is portion control. Part of the problem is that cows insist on growing to some similar size and when the butcher cuts them up the only control he has is how thick do you want it cut? And I'm sure that many will agree that we like our steaks thick, not big. I wish scientists could breed miniature cattle so that when you cut rib eye steaks you can cut them 2 inches thick and still have a reasonable serving size. Cattle ranchers would probably like bigger, cattle twice the size! I presume there's a per cow cost and per pound cost, and I presume the bigger the cow the cheaper it is for ranchers to produce. I bet they'd like a 20 ton cow 10 feet tall if somebody bred them! Well I just wanted to kick this around, to have fun with a topic. I don't see any solution except to cook Asian like I often do (or cook stews, meat only roasts like tri-tip where you can cut any serving size) where portion size and portion control is almost always assured when you're eating with chop sticks. But I like steaks too. I feel that too often the serving size is just out of control. I'm not going to buy a 1/2 inch thick rib eye. (I've seen them, "thin sliced.") I can't cook that and have any sear and rare to MR in the middle. Discuss. 3 stars 1 reviews
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