"Discover Cooking, Discuss Life."

Go Back   Discuss Cooking - Cooking Forums > Recipes & Ingredients > Beef, Pork, Lamb & Venison > Beef
Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
 
Old 01-30-2008, 06:52 PM   #1
Executive Chef
 
Join Date: Jun 2006
Location: upper midwest
Posts: 4,946
Question To bard meat.

I was going through a Fannie Farmer Cookbook, in the cooking procedures and it said to (bard) cover meats with a thin layer of fat before roasting them. Usually done with very lean meats to keep them from drying out. Do they mean to cover with bacon or rub with oil?

__________________

__________________
There isn't anyways an answer for every question.
JoAnn L. is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-30-2008, 06:59 PM   #2
DC's Angel
 
Buck's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2006
Location: Bardwell. Kentucky USA
Posts: 1,500
Barding means to drape with a piece fat so that, as the meat cooks, the fat melts over the meat to baste it. This keeps the meat moist and adds flavor.

Katie E told me to tell you this.
__________________

__________________
If we weren't meant to eat animals, then why are they made of meat?
Buck is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-30-2008, 07:01 PM   #3
Chef Extraordinaire
 
Katie H's Avatar
Site Moderator
 
Join Date: Sep 2006
Location: I live in the Heartland of the United States - Western Kentucky
Posts: 14,297
Thank you, Buck. You followed my instructions perfectly.
__________________
"As a girl I had zero interest in the stove." - Julia Child
This is real inspiration. Look what Julia became!
Katie H is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-30-2008, 11:51 PM   #4
Master Chef
 
Join Date: Jan 2008
Location: Cicero, IL
Posts: 5,093
LOL you two. The wife has a Fanny Farmer cook book, we love it!
__________________
Maverick2272 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-02-2008, 08:05 PM   #5
Senior Cook
 
sage™'s Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2007
Location: Sugar Land, Texas
Posts: 316
Fannie Farmer online Farmer, Fannie Merritt. 1918. The Boston Cooking-School Cook Book
__________________
sage™ is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-04-2008, 01:20 PM   #6
Senior Cook
 
Ask-A-Butcher's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2008
Location: Ft. Myers, Fl
Posts: 345
Quote:
Originally Posted by JoAnn L. View Post
I was going through a Fannie Farmer Cookbook, in the cooking procedures and it said to (bard) cover meats with a thin layer of fat before roasting them. Usually done with very lean meats to keep them from drying out. Do they mean to cover with bacon or rub with oil?
Bacon, thin sliced salt pork and/or jowl meat will work. Plus added flavor from the bacon

I've tried substituting 'turkey bacon', but I just don't like the texture.
__________________
[SIGPIC][/SIGPIC]Ask-A-Butcher

"Culture is what your butcher would have if he were a surgeon."
Mary Pettibone Poole
Ask-A-Butcher is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-04-2008, 02:01 PM   #7
Executive Chef
 
Join Date: Jun 2006
Location: upper midwest
Posts: 4,946
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ask-A-Butcher View Post
Bacon, thin sliced salt pork and/or jowl meat will work. Plus added flavor from the bacon

I've tried substituting 'turkey bacon', but I just don't like the texture.
Thank you so much for the information, I never thought of salt pork.
__________________
There isn't anyways an answer for every question.
JoAnn L. is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-07-2008, 11:19 PM   #8
Executive Chef
 
AllenOK's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2004
Location: USA, Oklahoma
Posts: 3,463
Another fat you can use is "Caul Fat". This is the fatty connective tissue that helps to hold the intestines in place. It looks like a lace doilie. Supposedly gives a nice crisp texture on the exterior as well as keeps the meat in the middle moist.

There's another technique, called "Larding", where you take julienne strips of fatback, clamp them into special needle, and stick the needle through the meat, pulling it out the other side, and clipping the fat off so the fat remains inside the meat. It's a good substitute for marbling. Don't ask me where to get "Larding Needles". I've only seen them once, in college, and never in my professional career have I heard of it since.
__________________
Peace, Love, and Vegetable Rights!
Eat Meat and Save the Plants!
AllenOK is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-06-2008, 01:11 AM   #9
Head Chef
 
Join Date: Dec 2004
Location: N.E., Ohio
Posts: 1,644
Larding and barding were techniques described by Escoffier as well as the use of caul fat. As a child, I remember seeing Julia Child doing it on one of her shows and I also have seen the Two Fat Ladies use that technique as well.
__________________
PieSusan is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-06-2008, 07:44 AM   #10
Executive Chef
 
Join Date: Apr 2008
Location: Collier County, Fl.
Posts: 4,198
Oh, the Two Fat Ladies.....I sure do miss them!
__________________

__________________
quicksilver is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Tags
None

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off




» Discuss Cooking on Facebook

Our Communities

Our communities encompass many different hobbies and interests, but each one is built on friendly, intelligent membership.

» More about our Communities

Automotive Communities

Our Automotive communities encompass many different makes and models. From U.S. domestics to European Saloons.

» More about our Automotive Communities

RV & Travel Trailer Communities

Our RV & Travel Trailer sites encompasses virtually all types of Recreational Vehicles, from brand-specific to general RV communities.

» More about our RV Communities

Marine Communities

Our Marine websites focus on Cruising and Sailing Vessels, including forums and the largest cruising Wiki project on the web today.

» More about our Marine Communities


Copyright 2002-2012 Social Knowledge, LLC All Rights Reserved.

All times are GMT -5. The time now is 05:37 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 4
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.

Cooking News & Tips Straight to your Email!

Stay up-to-date with Cooking info to your inbox!

unsusbcribe at anytime with one click

Close [X]