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Old 08-27-2006, 11:07 AM   #31
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Hopz
its me again... read this: http://www.virtualweberbullet.com/tritip1.html

It will teach you about tri-tip.

nuff said.....

IMNSHO you should marinate and grill the tritip. Then go get a nice pot roast...

OBTW if you want to add beer to a braise try a stout ot good porter...
i dont see where they says i cannot make a pot roast with tri tip? as i said, i dont have a grilll. one more monrh....just one more month...god im getting so anxious its annoying (getting a house in a month, cant BBQ on my apt balcony.

as i said, i have cooked a pot roast with a chuck, and a pot roast with a tri tip, and i preferred the tri tip. very delicious.

I like the way pot roast meat STORES in the fridge better than steak like meat. it always reheats nasty and dry,

pot roast reheats betterthan the day before.

for those saying a tri tip pot roast doesnt come out good, you should try it yourself. im new to roasting and mine came out delicious. everyone in my fam enjoyed it.
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Old 08-27-2006, 11:17 AM   #32
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MLB... yes! I also shred my leftover pot roast (and pork butts too) to make burritos, barbacoa and chili verde.

Good luck on the house and grill. Tritip is a new cut for me, and so far I've only used it on the grill. Two home runs for two at bats... I like it.
Let us hear how your turns out.
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Old 08-27-2006, 11:28 AM   #33
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yeah i already tried the tritip in the pot roast with amazing results.

next time this tritip is going into the smoker.

now THAT should be interesting.
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Old 08-27-2006, 01:01 PM   #34
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I'm glad your pot roast was enjoyed by all, and happy to hear that it came out better than your first try. Practice makes perfect when it comes to cooking, and hopefully each new effort will be better than the last.

But understand that one could go throw a 5-pound filet mignon or NY strip in a pot with onions, garlic, carrots, beer or wine, and other seasonings, put the pot in the oven for a few hours, and end up with a very tasty dish, I'm sure. That doesn't mean that those are the best meats for pot roast, nor does it mean that such cooking is the best preparation for such cuts.

There are differences in the physical characteristics of various cuts of meat that make some better for one purpose than another. I suggest that next time you try a brisket, center cut. It's extremely lean and makes great pot roast. Or try a cross-bone chuck, bottom round, or 7-bone roast, all relatively inexpensive and well suited to pot roasting.
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Old 08-27-2006, 02:33 PM   #35
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Originally Posted by FryBoy
I'm glad your pot roast was enjoyed by all, and happy to hear that it came out better than your first try. Practice makes perfect when it comes to cooking, and hopefully each new effort will be better than the last.

But understand that one could go throw a 5-pound filet mignon or NY strip in a pot with onions, garlic, carrots, beer or wine, and other seasonings, put the pot in the oven for a few hours, and end up with a very tasty dish, I'm sure. That doesn't mean that those are the best meats for pot roast, nor does it mean that such cooking is the best preparation for such cuts.

There are differences in the physical characteristics of various cuts of meat that make some better for one purpose than another. I suggest that next time you try a brisket, center cut. It's extremely lean and makes great pot roast. Or try a cross-bone chuck, bottom round, or 7-bone roast, all relatively inexpensive and well suited to pot roasting.
I've never seen a center-cut from the brisket. The usual choice is between the point cut and the flat or first cut. Most people recommend the leaner flat/first cut, with its outer layer of fat, but some like the point cut, which has more internal fat. I'd think you'd have to buy a whole brisket to get the center cut.

But yes, I agree with your assessment of what constitutes a cut of meat suitable for pot roasting as opposed to a more tender cut suited for roasting or grilling. The tender cuts lose flavor from being overcooked, while long, slow cooking, which breaks down all that connective tissue, enhances the flavor of the tougher cuts.
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Old 08-27-2006, 02:54 PM   #36
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Quote:
Originally Posted by suzyQ3
I've never seen a center-cut from the brisket. The usual choice is between the point cut and the flat or first cut.
As my father always said, listen to what I mean, not what I say!!!

I meant FIRST cut!
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Old 08-27-2006, 03:21 PM   #37
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MLB, basically, as a general rule, the more tender a cut of beef is or the more marbling it has, the quicker you want to cook it beit from grilling, searing, etc. Remember that there's a difference between marbling and fat. Marbling is fat that's within the connective tissues and is what gives certain cuts of beef both it's texture and flavor. Fat can just be the cap on the beef and not do anything for the interior of the cut.

Like Fryboy said, you could even braise a Kobe striploin roast and it will taste great, but why would you? In essence there's nothing wrong with it; it's your food and you can cook it how you like. But in order to extract the best possible flavor from a cut, there are better ways of cooking than others. Most tri-tips that I buy have a good deal of marbling and flavor. I would hate to lose that through slow cooking and a braising liquid.
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Old 08-27-2006, 06:23 PM   #38
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Originally Posted by FryBoy
That doesn't mean that those are the best meats for pot roast, nor does it mean that such cooking is the best preparation for such cuts.
im sorry but this is purely subjective. the characteristics that make a chuck roast preferable to most people is the way the muscle ligament or tendons or whatever beak down during cooking and the higher fat content makes the flavor better.

i personally dont eat a piece of meat with connective tissue and all of that stuff in there. if i get a bite out of that meat, it will cause me to gag, and ruin an entire meal.

and lol, of course a filet mignon(well, tenderloin, filet would be too small) would taste good as a pot roast. how could it not?

i don't follow any rigid guidelines for cooking. my tri tip roast was delicious and much better than my chuck. less fat and gristle to cut around.

The butcher at my meat market said as long as i have some good liquid in the dutch oven the tri tip roast would cook just fine as a pot roast. he was right.
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Old 08-27-2006, 06:25 PM   #39
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ironchef
MLB, basically, as a general rule, the more tender a cut of beef is or the more marbling it has, the quicker you want to cook it beit from grilling, searing, etc. Remember that there's a difference between marbling and fat. Marbling is fat that's within the connective tissues and is what gives certain cuts of beef both it's texture and flavor. Fat can just be the cap on the beef and not do anything for the interior of the cut.

Like Fryboy said, you could even braise a Kobe striploin roast and it will taste great, but why would you? In essence there's nothing wrong with it; it's your food and you can cook it how you like. But in order to extract the best possible flavor from a cut, there are better ways of cooking than others. Most tri-tips that I buy have a good deal of marbling and flavor. I would hate to lose that through slow cooking and a braising liquid.
ironchef, this meat was only 8.99 a pound dude. im not worried about compromising the integrity of the beef. i was in the mood for pot roast. all my butcher had was chuck, and tri tip. If i want some immaculate cut of beef i will get a kobe filet or something similar.

i have no qualms about pot roasting meat that is 9 dollars a pound.

it was only 2 lbs anyway.
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Old 08-27-2006, 06:51 PM   #40
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mylegsbig
im sorry but this is purely subjective. the characteristics that make a chuck roast preferable to most people is the way the muscle ligament or tendons or whatever beak down during cooking and the higher fat content makes the flavor better.

i personally dont eat a piece of meat with connective tissue and all of that stuff in there. if i get a bite out of that meat, it will cause me to gag, and ruin an entire meal.

and lol, of course a filet mignon(well, tenderloin, filet would be too small) would taste good as a pot roast. how could it not?

i don't follow any rigid guidelines for cooking. my tri tip roast was delicious and much better than my chuck. less fat and gristle to cut around.

The butcher at my meat market said as long as i have some good liquid in the dutch oven the tri tip roast would cook just fine as a pot roast. he was right.
My legs big, I wouldn't say that the differences in cuts of meat and how they cook are purely subjective. But our tastes and our preferences certainly are. I would politely remind you, though, that when you ask for advice, as you've done here and previously in great detail, that you should expect honest answers meant only to be helpful. If you disagree with the answers and the advice, sometimes a courteous "thank you" is the better reply.
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