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Old 01-08-2009, 09:57 AM   #11
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I have seen loin roasts where a longer loin is cut in half and the two halves are tied togetherr to make a thicker roast.
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Old 01-08-2009, 03:11 PM   #12
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Cook Roasts in oven or Top of Stove or Crockpot

Yes you can cook any roast many different way. Top of stove and crock pot roasts, tender and mosit.

Either way is fine. Your choice.
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Old 01-08-2009, 03:20 PM   #13
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I cook mine this way all of the time.
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Old 01-08-2009, 04:04 PM   #14
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Keep in mind that the pork loin is the same cut as the ribeye in beef. They are both best suited to dry roasting. Yes, you can cook a pork loin in a crock pot or braise it. Would you do that to a ribeye?
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Old 01-08-2009, 04:07 PM   #15
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No, but in this case the roasts I make are delicous.
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Old 01-08-2009, 04:21 PM   #16
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I use a similar method by rubbing the roast with olive oil then adding kosher salt and rosemary. I then tent it with foil and take the foil off the last 30 minutes so that it browns.
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Old 01-08-2009, 04:51 PM   #17
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Leolady View Post
No, but in this case the roasts I make are delicous.

I don't doubt they are delicious. What I was trying to say was that, since braising is a cooking method that was developed to deal with less desirable cuts of meat (tougher, more connective tissue and and extra-muscular fat), it would be overkill to use an expensive cut for braising.
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Old 01-08-2009, 06:24 PM   #18
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Oh!
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Old 01-08-2009, 08:16 PM   #19
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Well, there's a reason why this one is done on top the stove, as are many Italian meat dishes one might "expect" to see made in an oven. Until fairly recently (after WW II, for sure) most Italian homes did not have ovens. So if they wanted something roasted, they had to take it over to the bakery and get it baked after all the bread was done and the ovens were cooling.

As a result, many (rustic, especially) Italian meat recipes call for cooking in a covered pot on top the stove. As well, many Italians prefer their meat cooked to well done, because that's pretty much how they turned out baked in the bakers oven, and that's what they got used to -- except for grilled meats, of course.

Converting this dish, or any similar ones to oven baking is pretty easy, especially if your pot is oven-safe. Just don't set the oven too high.
Very interesting, I often find the history behind food just as appealing as the food itself!
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