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Old 12-12-2013, 11:42 AM   #1
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Bone-in pork roast: chine bone vs. back bone?

For New Year's this year, I want to make a bone-in pork rib roast, and I'd like to carve it bone-in into chops. From what I've read, the removal of the chinebone is necessary for this. However, I also came across one recipe that stated "chine bone removed and backbone cracked." I'm not sure what exactly this means and is it necessary? If I go to the meat counter and ask that, will they know what I mean?

And is there anything else I should take into consideration? Just wondering... because last year I tried a bone-in pork roast and wasn't aware of the chinebone, so didn't specify anything, and I had to just remove the meat from the bones after roasting in order to carve. So I'd like to make sure I get it right this time.

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Old 12-12-2013, 03:19 PM   #2
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...However, I also came across one recipe that stated "chine bone removed and backbone cracked."...
This is what you need.

Talk to a meat department person and tell them what you want. They'll understand.
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Old 12-12-2013, 09:56 PM   #3
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If the cost per pound includes the chine bone, they need to reweigh it without the bone or return that bone to you once it has been removed along with the roast. Make a note of the cost of the full roast before they cut it and then see what the cost is after it is removed. You can roast the chine bone along with your roast and let the kids pick off the meat or do it your self and place the bits and pieces in your gravy like you would the giblets of a turkey. There is a lot of flavor in that chine bone.
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Old 12-14-2013, 06:36 AM   #4
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Understand your confusion crankin.

When you are talking about bones, terms vary between anatomists and butchers. Also there are common terms. What Gray's anatomy refers to as the vertebral body your butcher calls the chine bone (it's the round, disc like bone). Similarly there are spinous and tranverse processes that the trade refers to as feather and finger bones (these are flat bones). And the term backbone generally refers to the whole spine or maybe the individual vertebrae. Yipes!

Fortunately you don't need to know all that stuff to get what you want

Tell the butcher (have found those at the supermarkets to be very helpful) what you want to do with the cut of meat and he will do his magic so you can easily cut the roast into chops after cooking with a knife. It truly is as easy as that.

In my experience butchers in supermarkets are great and will go out of their way to get what you want even if it requires special ordering (which in your case it will not).

Hope this helps.
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Old 12-14-2013, 07:10 AM   #5
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Unfortunately for the consumer, in a large chain supermarket, every extra cut is added into the cost of labor in the price per pound.

If you have a pork roast with the chine bone at $1.00 per pound and you want the chine bone removed, the cost goes up to $1.05 per pound. And the butcher keep the chine bone. (Sneaky) You now want the bones Frenched and the cost goes up to $1.10 p.p. Want them also cut into individual chops? $1.15 p.p.

I have a local butcher with a small shop. Their margin of profit is even smaller than the chain store. But on the whole they are pretty good about not adding those extra charges for additional services. The quality of their meat is really good and you have to stand in line to get a piece of meat that you ordered over the phone for a holiday meal. They offer services that the chain stores don't. And they don't nickel and dime you.
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Old 12-14-2013, 09:10 AM   #6
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This guy gives a nice demonstration of preparing a pork roast for roasting and carving. You don't need to go to a full crown roast just stop after you french the ribs and roast it as a candle roast. Save all of those scraps and bones, they are great roasted with a pound of sauerkraut!

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Old 12-14-2013, 02:21 PM   #7
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This guy gives a nice demonstration of preparing a pork roast for roasting and carving. You don't need to go to a full crown roast just stop after you french the ribs and roast it as a candle roast. Save all of those scraps and bones, they are great roasted with a pound of sauerkraut!

I want all that meat and bones he trimmed off. Great gravy making. Also, if you grind the pieces of meat, mix with a stuffing mix and tie two crown roasts together, you put the stuffing in the middle. Now you have a great presentation.
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Old 12-14-2013, 02:39 PM   #8
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I want all that meat and bones he trimmed off. Great gravy making. Also, if you grind the pieces of meat, mix with a stuffing mix and tie two crown roasts together, you put the stuffing in the middle. Now you have a great presentation.
I agree, Addie. When I buy a big slab o' meat, I prefer to cut it up myself. One of the local grocery stores that prides itself for its meat, offers to cut and trim it for free. I did that once, and asked for the trimmings, they wouldn't give them to me. Plus they weighed and charged the full price of the meat pre-trimmed. I learned quickly.
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Old 12-14-2013, 02:54 PM   #9
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I agree, Addie. When I buy a big slab o' meat, I prefer to cut it up myself. One of the local grocery stores that prides itself for its meat, offers to cut and trim it for free. I did that once, and asked for the trimmings, they wouldn't give them to me. Plus they weighed and charged the full price of the meat pre-trimmed. I learned quickly.
By charging you for the pre-trimmed weight, they are getting a little extra for doing the trimming. It's a cost of doing business.

The practice may be different at a local butcher shop but they probably already charge more per pound than the supermarket.
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Old 12-14-2013, 03:05 PM   #10
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By charging you for the pre-trimmed weight, they are getting a little extra for doing the trimming. It's a cost of doing business.

The practice may be different at a local butcher shop but they probably already charge more per pound than the supermarket.
Good point, Andy.

I do find it relaxing to cut up my own steaks, chops, and roasts. And the trimmings, fat and bones are all mine!
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