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Old 06-08-2013, 05:24 PM   #11
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Originally Posted by Chief Longwind Of The North View Post
Well, it certainly is not a Sault Ste. Marie butt, or a Jersey butt. Those are bigger.
the jersey ones are made of steel.
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Old 06-08-2013, 07:32 PM   #12
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Originally Posted by buckytom View Post
the jersey ones are made of steel.
Says the man with the rusty butt.

Oh! I didn't say that. It was her, really.

Now BT, aren't you the guy they referenced for the commanding officer on the old Macale's Navy series, you know who I mean, ol' leadbottom.

If'n yuz are gonna be a little brudda from Joisey, then yas gotta toughen up, see. Cuz big brudda luvs showin' off his little brudda, and I canst do dat ifn yo a whimp. And dare ain't no whimps in Joisey,got it!

By the way, that recipe that started this thread, it looks really good. I wonder if it would work with maybe a brisket. Sadly, DW can't handle any "heat" in her food at all. If I made that, I'd be eating it myself for a month, or at least a couple of meals..

Hmmm, maybe I could downsize it to a couple of good, thick, pork chops.

Seeeeya; Chief Longwind of the North
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Old 06-08-2013, 10:17 PM   #13
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you can easily leave out the red pepper flakes and cayenne, chief.

how does the mrs. do with spicy brown mustard and wohoosterchestrsheetershire sauce?

you can swap them out for yellow or dijon mustard, and soy sauce, repectively.

and yes, i think could work with a well marbled brisket, and maybe some sirloin end or shoulder pork chops. rib chops would be too lean... = dry.

lemme know if you try one of these abominations, er, i mean different combos.
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Old 06-09-2013, 08:44 PM   #14
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Originally Posted by buckytom View Post
you can easily leave out the red pepper flakes and cayenne, chief.

how does the mrs. do with spicy brown mustard and wohoosterchestrsheetershire sauce?

you can swap them out for yellow or dijon mustard, and soy sauce, repectively.

and yes, i think could work with a well marbled brisket, and maybe some sirloin end or shoulder pork chops. rib chops would be too lean... = dry.

lemme know if you try one of these abominations, er, i mean different combos.
French's Yellow Mustard, mixed into honey is her limit. It seems that she had a condition called "Burning Tongue Syndrome" that left her taste buds super sensitive. Vinegar is too acidic, as are some ketchups, most mustards, and anything with any amount of pepper. Things she used to love, such as my pineapple sweet & sour sauce are almost off limits to her now.

I often make two versions of things I cook, one part for me (I like spicy in the extreme), and one part that accounts for DW's limitations. I do love the woman, and try to give her the best food that I can.

Oh, and though this has nothing to do with this thread, I have now graduated to top of the class in eating hot foods. I was challenged today to sample a Buk Jalokia pepper, that a freind had grown. He gave me a bag full that he'd frozen. I ate half of it, and wasn't even in pain. I could tell though, that these aren't peppers for ordinary mortals. Half a raw ghost pepper, I could handle. But I wouldn't be casually snacking on these babies. That could be painful. Interestingly enough, after the heat had subsided, I found that by squeezing my tongue to my hard palate, the heat would return. When I removed the pressure, it was gone again. Oh, the pepper did clear my sinuses. And I was told that my face turned a share more red. But it didn't make we sweat.

I'm not sure that the ability to eat very hot things is a desensitization of taste buds, or compartmentalizing the pain, or maybe learning to ignore it. I found that if I concentratied on the sensation, I could begin to experience slight distress. Our brains have a way of protecting us. Sometimes that's a good thing, sometimes not.

Food for thought. Though, there are those that say I think too much.

Seeeeeeya; Chief Longwind of the North
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Buckytom's Spicy Carolina Style Pulled Pork Recipe for the Crock Pot this is a revised version of a recipe for pulled pork made in a crock pot that i posted many years ago on food.com (recipezaar.com back then) that's gotten several 5 star reviews. i got the recipe from a native american lady from north carolina who was selling fantastic, spicy pulled pork sandwiches at a native american drum and dance festival in a state park near where i go camping. it's extremely easy to do as all you do is rub the pork shoulder (a boston butt is best) with dry seasonings, wrap tightly in plastic, and refrigerate overnight. the next day, unwrap, and let cook in the crock pot for a few hours with onions and a seasoned vinegar and there you go. [B]ingredients:[/B] [I]for the dry rub[/I]: 3 tablespoons brown sugar 2 tablespoons paprika 2 teaspoons sea salt 1 tablespoon freshly cracked black pepper 1 tablespoon crushed red pepper flakes 5 to 6 lbs pork shoulder (boston butt) [I]for the cooking liquid/extra seasoning after pulling:[/I] 1 1/2 cups red wine vinegar 2 tablespoons worcestershire sauce 1 tablespoons crushed red pepper flakes 1 tablespoon white sugar 2 tablespoons spicy brown mustard 1 tablespoon garlic powder 1 teaspoon powdered cayenne pepper 2 red onions, quartered 2 yellow onions, quartered [B]directions:[/B] 1. the day before you plan on eating this, prepare the pork shoulder by laying out a few long, overlapping sheets of plastic wrap on a counter, and place the shoulder in the middle. 2. combine the first 5 ingredients listed, then rub into all sides of the pork shoulder. 3. wrap tightly in the plastic wrap, place on a deep plate in case there's some leakage, and put into the refrigerator overnight. ------------------------------ 4. the next day, turn your crock pot on high and let it warm up. while it's getting hot, place the 4 quartered onions on the bottom of the crock. 5. unwrap the seasoned pork shoulder and place in the crock on top of the onions. 6. combine the rest of the ingredients listed with the red wine vinegar and mix well. pour about 3/4's of it over the pork shoulder and onions, reserving some to be added to the pork after pulling. 7. cover and let it cook for 4 to 5 hours, or until the shoulder is falling apart and the bone pulls cleanly out of the meat using a pair of tongs (careful, it'll be very hot). 8. using a pair of slotted spoons, remove the shoulder meat to a wide dish or bowl. then, using the spoons remove as much of the onions as you can to a seperate bowl. 9. let cool enough to touch (but still warm), and pull/shred the pork using 2 large forks, a pair of bear claws, or even just your hands. 10. chop the onions into fairly small bits, and mix into the pulled pork. also, mix in the reserved seasoned vinegar. serve on soft buns with chips and kosher dill pickles. optional: while this is the way i first had it, i've found a lot of people like the meat mixed with a sweet bbq sauce such as sweet baby ray's original. 3 stars 1 reviews
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