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Old 07-20-2006, 12:35 PM   #11
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It is my understanding that the pork continues to cook while it's resting and covered with foil.
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Old 07-20-2006, 12:55 PM   #12
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If you remove it at that temperature, the meat continues cooking another 10*or even 15*.
I do not mind at all if others want to cook a loin or tenderloin to that temperature. I don't. If you cook it to 145* and let it rest, the final temp will will be about 155*. It will be barely rosy and have succulent juices.
Here is a quote from a cooking site--admittedly not the USDA which has to go to the outer extremes in order to cover all food safety contingencies. I do not think you could find a restaurant chef of any note that would cook pork to that high temp.
And again, we are talking about tender cuts for this temp. When tougher meats are cooked at low temperatures they can reach much higher internal temperatures--190-205* temp I mentioned which breaks down the collagen tissues of tough cuts of meat to make it VERY meltingly tender.
If you cook any piece of meat at 350* I don't believe you could even reach those temperatures--or insert a thermometer in the meat. ;o)

and an aside, 145* for beef, if you removed it at that temp, would make it well done after the resting temp. Remove at 125* for rare--the temp rises at least 10* after a rest which is used in order for the juices to retract and not bleed out if you started carving immediately. The larger the roast the longer the rest time that is recommended.

Here is the quote, with good information. Trichinosis has virtually been eliminated. Additionally, if your meat has been frozen, there is no possibility of the parasite.
The official line on cooking pork is that the internal temperature should be at least 71C (160F). If you want to be completely, utterly safe, then I recommend you cook it to that temperature.
However, the bad stuff (trichinella spiralis) that could potentially lurk in pork is not only fairly rare these days, it’s also killed at an internal temperature of 58C (137F). Also bear in mind that pork loin is a very lean cut of meat: there’s no marbling of fat inside to keep it juicy when cooked to an internal temperature of 71C (160F) or higher. I find that cooking pork loin to a temperature of 63C (145F) and letting it rest for 10 or 15 minutes results in meat that is tender, pearly white, fairly moist and definitely thoroughly cooked. If you buy good meat (ideally, organic and free range) and handle it properly, then your chances of getting ill from pork are quite slim indeed.
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Old 07-20-2006, 01:55 PM   #13
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Constance
It is my understanding that the pork continues to cook while it's resting and covered with foil.
Actually all meats continue to cook in this way.

While I have respect for the USDA, I don;t agree with their 160 F guideline.

I always remove the roast at a lower temp-usually 145-150 F and let it rest as Gretchen advocates. The roast can go up to that temp with residual heat, yielding the 160 F mark recommended. Active cooking in the oven to 160 F and resting will, in my opinion, yield a dry piece of meat.
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Old 07-20-2006, 02:19 PM   #14
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I usually only cook chops or tenderloin via oven roasting.

But I always brine them so that I can cook them to well done w/o holdover and not be dried out. I agree that cooking pork which hasn't been brined this way will make it very dry and unappetizing.
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Old 07-20-2006, 02:43 PM   #15
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Originally Posted by jennyema
...But I always brine them so that I can cook them to well done w/o holdover and not be dried out. I agree that cooking pork which hasn't been brined this way will make it very dry and unappetizing.

I think brining is a tremendous benefit for pork roasts. I brine more for pork than other meats.
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Old 07-20-2006, 04:12 PM   #16
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A great way to cook chops or tenderloin (pork) is to sear in a cast iron pan and then finish in a 425* oven.
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Old 07-20-2006, 04:20 PM   #17
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Gretchen
A great way to cook chops or tenderloin (pork) is to sear in a cast iron pan and then finish in a 425* oven.

I agree. That's usually how I cook them if I use the oven.
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