"Discover Cooking, Discuss Life."

Go Back   Discuss Cooking - Cooking Forums > Recipes & Ingredients > Beef, Pork, Lamb & Venison > Pork
Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
 
Old 03-06-2014, 01:03 PM   #1
Senior Cook
 
Join Date: Mar 2007
Posts: 350
Considerations for brining bone-in pork roast

I'm making a bone-in pork rib roast and am considering brining. I have some questions:

1. How much will brining add? I am planning for a 4-5 pound, bone-in, pork rib loin roast.

2. If I do brine, can anyone offer a good recipe for this size/type of roast? The recipe I was planning to follow is this:

- 1 cup brown sugar
- 1 cup kosher salt
- Garlic (about 1 head of garlic cloves, crushed)
- Bay leaves
- Thyme and rosemary sprigs
- Black peppercorns
- 1 gallon of water

And then brine for maybe 3-4 hours? I'm wondering if those amounts are appropriate ... if there should be less salt ... and if the time sounds correct for this size roast.

I'm also planning to put a mixture of fresh rosemary/thyme/garlic/pepper on the pork before roasting. And serving it with roasted apples and onions.

Lastly and not brine related... at what temperature would you remove the pork from the oven? I was thinking 135 ... would that give a final rested (10-15 minutes) of around 145?

__________________

__________________
crankin is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-06-2014, 01:25 PM   #2
Certified Pretend Chef
 
Andy M.'s Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2004
Location: Massachusetts
Posts: 41,363
I'd double the salt and sugar to 2 cups each for a gallon of water. Put the ingredients into a pot with half the water (2 quarts) and bring it to a boil to release the flavors of the seasonings then turn off the burner. Add a little over 4 pounds of ice to the pot and stir until all the ice is melted and the liquid is cool. The ice will cool the hot brine solution down so it's safe for the meat. Brine for 6-8 hours and rinse off the pork when done. Pat dry before roasting. 135F to 140F is a good range to pull the roast. The meat closest to the bones will cook last. Cover and rest for 15-20 minutes before carving.
__________________

__________________
"If you want to make an apple pie from scratch, you must first create the universe." -Carl Sagan
Andy M. is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-06-2014, 01:32 PM   #3
Senior Cook
 
Join Date: Mar 2007
Posts: 350
Quote:
Originally Posted by Andy M. View Post
I'd double the salt and sugar to 2 cups each for a gallon of water. Put the ingredients into a pot with half the water (2 quarts) and bring it to a boil to release the flavors of the seasonings then turn off the burner. Add a little over 4 pounds of ice to the pot and stir until all the ice is melted and the liquid is cool. The ice will cool the hot brine solution down so it's safe for the meat. Brine for 6-8 hours and rinse off the pork when done. Pat dry before roasting. 135F to 140F is a good range to pull the roast. The meat closest to the bones will cook last. Cover and rest for 15-20 minutes before carving.
Thanks. Also I was curious, I'd say about half the pork loin recipes I've looked for call for brining while the others call for rubbing the meat with a mixture of salt/spices, covering with plastic wrap and refridgerating for 12-24 hours. Have you tried both methods or have an opinion on which works better?
__________________
crankin is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-06-2014, 01:35 PM   #4
Chief Eating Officer
 
GB's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2004
Location: USA,Massachusetts
Posts: 25,509
The second process is called dry brining. I have never used it with a pork loin, but that is how I make my steaks now. The salt draws out moisture initially, but then dissolves the salt and gets drawn back into the meat given enough time. It adds flavor without changing the texture of the meat. Both wet and dry brining work very well when done right. You will need to try each to see which you like more.
__________________
You know you can't resist clicking
this link. Your eyes will thank you. VISUAL BLISS
GB is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Tags
pork, roast

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off



» Discuss Cooking on Facebook

Our Communities

Our communities encompass many different hobbies and interests, but each one is built on friendly, intelligent membership.

» More about our Communities

Automotive Communities

Our Automotive communities encompass many different makes and models. From U.S. domestics to European Saloons.

» More about our Automotive Communities

Marine Communities

Our Marine websites focus on Cruising and Sailing Vessels, including forums and the largest cruising Wiki project on the web today.

» More about our Marine Communities


Copyright 2002- Social Knowledge, LLC All Rights Reserved.

All times are GMT -5. The time now is 03:50 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 4
Copyright ©2000 - 2016, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.