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Old 01-10-2016, 08:29 PM   #1
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Deep fried pork shoulder

I just deep fried a Turkey and it was awesome. Wondering about doing the same with a pork shoulder. Thinking of brining for 24 hrs and frying. The turkey was fried to perfection @ 300 deg for 3.5 mins per pound. Found on livestrong page they advice 8 mins per pound for pork leg/shoulder. It seems too much to me. Anyone has experience with this as per time/pound and/or temperature?

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Old 01-11-2016, 12:03 AM   #2
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I am afraid I am not much help on this. I have fried a lot turkeys over the years, but have never done pork. I would guess the longer cooking time is because the turkeys cavity allows it to be cooked from the inside also. Let us know how it turns out.
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Old 01-11-2016, 12:14 AM   #3
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I've never done that, either. I'm guessing another reason for the longer cooking time is that, in order to become tender, pork shoulder has to reach about 195F to melt the connective tissue. Turkey would be severely overcooked at that point.
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Old 01-11-2016, 10:12 AM   #4
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Originally Posted by GotGarlic View Post
I've never done that, either. I'm guessing another reason for the longer cooking time is that, in order to become tender, pork shoulder has to reach about 195F to melt the connective tissue. Turkey would be severely overcooked at that point.
Yes. Also, a pork shoulder is a much thicker piece of meat so heat has to penetrate a long way. I'd be concerned about the outer parts of the meat by the time the center reaches the target temperature.
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Old 01-11-2016, 11:38 AM   #5
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Glad someone brought up the term "pork shoulder".

I got into a debate about what is a pork shoulder.
I grew up with a cut some people call a "fresh" ham or pork picnic. This is also called a "shoulder".
My friend insisted that a "Boston Butt" was also a shoulder roast. And after we checked we found that to be true.

So why is a butt roast a shoulder and a fresh ham "picnic" a shoulder? Two very different cuts, yet both are classed as the shoulder.
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Old 01-11-2016, 11:41 AM   #6
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See attached. They're two different parts of the shoulder primal cut.

btw, I'm going to a hog butchery class Wednesday at a local butcher's. I'm so excited!

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Old 01-11-2016, 11:42 AM   #7
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See attached. They're two different parts of the shoulder primal cut.

btw, I'm going to a whole-hog butchery class Wednesday at a local butcher's. I'm so excited!

Much better than what we saw the day of the discussion. Thanks GG.
It seems the picnic should be called something else as its not the shoulder, but the leg. Or is it an extension of the shoulder.
You can see why we were at odds over the terminology.
This is what caused the debate and frankly we both were correct.
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Old 01-11-2016, 11:46 AM   #8
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It includes part of the leg, but in the pig, the shoulder joint is actually in the picnic area. And the amount of leg included depends on the butcher and how they cut it.

I was confused about it for a long time, too. The two cuts do have different properties. I prefer the butt because it has fewer muscle types so it cooks more evenly.
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Old 01-11-2016, 11:50 AM   #9
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Here's another view:

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Old 01-11-2016, 02:48 PM   #10
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I wouldn't deep fry a pork shoulder, I'd be afraid I'd ruin it. I've always cooked them low and slow. Like GG mentioned above, long cooking time works best for breaking down the connective tissue resulting in a nice tender pork roast.
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