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Old 09-07-2014, 11:32 PM   #21
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Originally Posted by CWS4322 View Post
We used to add apples, onions, and raisins to the beer gravy when we made liver in Germany (dredge the liver in seasoned flour, brown it, add the onions, raisins, apples cook those until onions are limp, pour in a bottle of beer [or use cider], cover and simmer about 10 minutes. Makes great gravy). I make a German pork roast with apples, onions, potatoes, raisins and either beer or apple cider in my Roemertopf.

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I couldn't do the raisins and apples with my liver...bacon and onions only, Thanks!
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Old 09-08-2014, 02:18 PM   #22
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I found it in the Cooks' Illustrated Best International Recipe cookbook in the German section. Saute the onions in butter, with a little salt and thyme, till softened and starting to brown, then add apple slices. Deglaze with a little apple cider if necessary and continue to saute, or cover and cook on low heat, till everything is tender, stirring occasionally. Good stuff
I will definitely be making that GG. It sounds perfect for a third side for company.
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Old 09-08-2014, 02:24 PM   #23
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I couldn't do the raisins and apples with my liver...bacon and onions only, Thanks!
I don't understand, PF........??

Ohhh good grief...I thought raisins and apples were bad for your liver.

Duhhh...... I need more coffee.
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Old 09-08-2014, 08:18 PM   #24
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I don't understand, PF........??

Ohhh good grief...I thought raisins and apples were bad for your liver.

Duhhh...... I need more coffee.
Just sauerkraut, brussels sprouts and cauliflower are bad for my liver.
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Old 09-09-2014, 07:05 AM   #25
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I have never, ever considered apples and onions sauteed together, but that sounds wonderful. What fat do you saute them in? Any seasoning?
It's a wonderful combination. One of my favorite fall meals is acorn squash stuffed with curried apples and onions.
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Old 09-10-2014, 02:27 AM   #26
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Kayelle, that is a much easier recipe than one I use for my tenderloin. One of my very first adventures with a "gourmet" recipe was "Snowboarders' Pork Tenderloin" from a Diane Mott Davidson murder mystery. It was melt-in-your-mouth tender, but after hand-mincing six(!) garlic cloves I smelled like garlic for the rest of the night! I couldn't find my garlic press, and I hadn't learned the trick of smashing it with the blade of a chef's knife yet.

If you're looking for yet another make-ahead side dish, what about cranberry sauce? I think cranberries are tasty with pork too, and I have a killer recipe that includes a Granny Smith apple and port wine that I clipped out of a magazine. It's somewhere...
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Old 09-10-2014, 07:58 AM   #27
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Kayelle, that is a much easier recipe than one I use for my tenderloin. One of my very first adventures with a "gourmet" recipe was "Snowboarders' Pork Tenderloin" from a Diane Mott Davidson murder mystery. It was melt-in-your-mouth tender, but after hand-mincing six(!) garlic cloves I smelled like garlic for the rest of the night! I couldn't find my garlic press, and I hadn't learned the trick of smashing it with the blade of a chef's knife yet.

If you're looking for yet another make-ahead side dish, what about cranberry sauce? I think cranberries are tasty with pork too, and I have a killer recipe that includes a Granny Smith apple and port wine that I clipped out of a magazine. It's somewhere...
Cranberries and apples are in season now (at least where I live). Fresh garlic is still available, although it was pulled in August.
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Old 05-12-2015, 08:11 PM   #28
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I must have been on Computer Sabbatical when this was first posted last summer. Copied Ta'day.

The first time I cooked with a lot of mustard, I slathered a rack of spare ribs Generously with ball park mustard before applying a rub and then tossed on the grill to bask over some charcoal. Once they heated up Mosquitos started dropping like flies, the Roses wilted, song birds migrated across the street. Mind you, this was grilling Low and Slow, so it took a Long Time for the mustard smell to fully come to the fore, and forever for it to go away. And that's when the Crust developed and the rub stuck in... I think.

The 2nd time I used a lot of Dijon mustard to bake some red skinned potatoes, quartered and tossed with herbs. I thought I might need to open windows even though it was sometime in winter. But my, those potatoes turned so brown and were so good.

Both of these times, the mustard flavor dissipates leaving an underlying flavor you can't quite put your finger on.
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Old 08-22-2016, 06:47 PM   #29
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Final recipe

1 pork tenderloin (they usually come two to the package)
4 0Z Grey Poupon Dijon mustard (half a jar)
5-6 Tbs Herbs de Provence, with or without lavender.
Salt to taste

Remove any silver skin from the tenderloin. Pound out the whole tenderloin so that it's approximately all the same thickness. Place on a small cookie sheet and lightly salt on both sides. With the back of a spoon, thickly frost the top with half the mustard and sprinkle on half of the Herbs de Provence. Flip the meat over on the pan, and do the same on the other side.
Set your oven rack closest to the flame of the broiler, and broil for 15 minutes without turning. Let it rest for about 10 minutes and transfer to a cutting board. Carefully slice 1/2 inch slices on the bias to keep the top crust in.

Pork tenderloin, pounded thin, pan seared in spices and sauced with an apple brandy cream

OK - I am sharing my husbands FAVORITE dish. I make this about once a year and serve it with mashed potatoes, egg noodles or spatzle. He says he wants this as his last meal.

I learned to make this dish as a student in Normandy and it's surprisingly easy although the cook goes really fast - having everything ready to go stove side.

1 pork tenderloin, cut into 1.5 inch medallions and then pounded out super thin. Buy a small one and you will have very little left over. A typical tenderloin weighs about a pound.

Season and sprinkle pieces on both sides with a blend of

salt, pepper
ground juniper berries
ground anise seed
minced rosemary (just little)
garlic powder

You can just pound up the spice and salt in a mortar and pestle or wiz up in a coffee grinder - doesn't have to be too fine. All of the above prep can be done well in advance but this next bit needs to be done just before dinner.

Dredge in flour just prior to cooking

Pan sear (really hot) in butter and remove to a serving plate (this goes fast). Turn up the heat on the burner for this - you want them to cook fast and get some nice caramelisation but you don't want the meat to become tough. Typically these will take about 1 minute on each side. You can cook two at a time in a large pan, doing the batch sequentially - they go fast. Set them in a serving platter as you rotate them out of the pan.

Deglaze pan with calvados (apple brandy)and reduce heat.
Add apple puree - about 1/2 cup. The best I've found to use is jarred all natural baby food applesauce. It's very smooth and this is important. It's also important to use unsweetened applesauce - you need the acid tang of the apple to offset the cream.
Add cream - about 1/3 C.
Add juice from resting pork back into pan and re-season with salt and pepper.

I suggest at friends that this is a good recipe.

Had only one weekend for the pork, and I now adore both cooks.
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Old 08-22-2016, 09:34 PM   #30
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Question I'm confused

Quote:
Originally Posted by erehweslefox View Post
.. snipped ...
OK - I am sharing my husbands FAVORITE dish. I make this about once a year and serve it with mashed potatoes, egg noodles or spatzle. He says he wants this as his last meal.
... snipped ...
" I would like to eat a pig ...
Sooo...

Beloved Wife is out of town on business until Saturday. I cook for an audience, and it is her. But she is Jewish. I have not had pork in quite some time.

Now I'm not cheating, and believe me we don't keep a kosher kitchen, Dear Wife is also from Maryland, so we had a negotiated agreement with the crustaceans from the start. But yes, she doesn't like eating pork so it is anathema in our diet normally.

and I don't care if you like it, Turkey bacon is NOT THE SAME.

Give me one pork recipe, assume I have a functional kitchen, and I don't want leftovers, so no big island style luau stuff."


I'm VERY confused?!
Which is it? Are we conversing with both Mister and Missus erehweslefox
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