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Old 08-31-2006, 11:00 AM   #11
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Old 08-31-2006, 05:51 PM   #12
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Agree with QSis, the book by Rytek Kutas is great and I think a must read for anyone getting interested in sausage making.

He also sells a lot of sausage making materials, is worth a look.

Totally agree that frying up the forcemeat is necessary to adjust the seasonings, but we have found the flavor is not exactly the same as it will be when the sausage has had a chance to sit for awhile. The flavors will be more pronounced in the final product and the sausage will be more salty than one tastes in the initial frying.

At least in our experience.

And so we use the frying step as a guide, a very necessary one, but we don't add enough extra salt and spices to make the initial fried patty taste just the way we want the sausage to taste. Or we have found we wind up with an overly spiced product.

Making sausage is a lot of fun. We have the KA adaptor and an electric grinder but usually use the hand cranked onel

Hope you enjoy.

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Old 09-01-2006, 09:12 AM   #13
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Thanks AuntDot - I probably would have over-seasoned! In the instructions for the recipe that I found on google (link above) they recommended letting the sausage to rest in the fridge for 24 hours before cooking. Makes sense and ties in with your advice.

A quetion: I am going to cut the meat into cubes manually and then mix it with the spices then put it through the grinder - it occurs to me that I might not get the ingredients evenly enough distributed before placing in the casings. Maybe I should grind it first, then put it through the grinder again, but without the blade, when I stuff the casings. Am I making sense?
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Old 09-01-2006, 10:00 AM   #14
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I made sausaage last year using pork and venison. I did some in casings and that takes 2 people for sure. I also made patties and they were really good. You can grind the meat and then mix by hand to make sure you have it all mixed. Just don't squeeze it.Have fun.
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Old 09-22-2006, 12:34 AM   #15
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where can you buy sausage casings in toronto? I always wanted to try to make homemade sauages (with cheese) since my kitchen aide is equipped for that
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Old 09-22-2006, 04:14 AM   #16
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Sandy? I've only just seen this thread, thanks to Prada's post. Have you now made the sausage? How'd it go? Give us an update, please!

We started making all our own sausage last year and it was so easy and so succesful we've never looked back. We now almost always have packages in the freezer of a "Greek" sausage (leek and orange peel), an "Italian" (lots of fennel seed, yum), and a "German" which is the traditional American "breakfast sausage". I'd be happy to trade recipes if you'd like.

By the way, did you ever get an answer to that question about the licorice flavor? If not, here's my take: both anise seed and fennel seed have a licorice-ish flavor. The fennel seed is a good bit larger so it's maybe not advisable to use whole, whereas the anise seed is a very delicate thing. (I just love to sprinkle anise seed on all sorts of things -- tuna salad, sandwiches, etc.!)

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