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Old 12-05-2014, 12:01 PM   #11
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I still have many bad childhood memories of my mother's shoe leather pork chops. We always kept serrated knives on hand for just those occasions.

In the past few years, I've started to enjoy pork again, in part because of the lower cooking temperature recommendations. But I'm very picky about the cuts I buy. Most of the chops I've bought in grocery stores - even the higher end co-ops - are super lean with one big strip of fat that runs along the outer edge. Like GLC mentions, I would love to find some cuts with fat marbling within the meat.

Unfortunately, the local so-called pasture-raised product doesn't seem to cut it, either. I may have to look outside the area.
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Old 12-05-2014, 12:14 PM   #12
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I always brine my chops and this is my favorite way to cook them. No need to go out in the snow, as they can be done on a stove top grill...

Perfect grilled pork chops.
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Old 12-05-2014, 04:20 PM   #13
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Brown them on both sides in a frying pan, add a can of Bush's beans and a can of water, and allow it to simmer until the sauce thickens to your taste. My mother always said, "You can't make a dry pork chop this way."
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Old 12-05-2014, 05:15 PM   #14
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Shake 'N Bake !
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Old 12-05-2014, 05:21 PM   #15
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Steve Kroll View Post
I still have many bad childhood memories of my mother's shoe leather pork chops. We always kept serrated knives on hand for just those occasions.

In the past few years, I've started to enjoy pork again, in part because of the lower cooking temperature recommendations. But I'm very picky about the cuts I buy. Most of the chops I've bought in grocery stores - even the higher end co-ops - are super lean with one big strip of fat that runs along the outer edge. Like GLC mentions, I would love to find some cuts with fat marbling within the meat.

Unfortunately, the local so-called pasture-raised product doesn't seem to cut it, either. I may have to look outside the area.
I just bought a pork shoulder roast so I could use half for posole and half for braised pork chops. There will be lots of marbling within the meat, but of course, since it's a tough cut, it will have to be simmered in liquid. I'm planning on chops braised in onion gravy for tonight and pork alla pizzaiola for another time.
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Old 12-05-2014, 07:23 PM   #16
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My mom used to make a casserole of pork chops, frozen lima beans, rice and canned soup. I think cream of celery? I adored this as a kid... has anyone had anything like this?
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Old 12-05-2014, 07:32 PM   #17
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i got a frying pat very hot with olive oil and butter, Seared the chops on both sides (3 min. per side) then in a 375 deg. oven for 10 mins. Turned out great!
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Old 12-06-2014, 01:38 AM   #18
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Originally Posted by GotGarlic View Post
I just bought a pork shoulder roast so I could use half for posole and half for braised pork chops. There will be lots of marbling within the meat, but of course, since it's a tough cut, it will have to be simmered in liquid. I'm planning on chops braised in onion gravy for tonight and pork alla pizzaiola for another time.
That sounds great!

I like pork shoulder, as well as blade steak, which comes from the same part of the animal. My favorite recipe for those cuts is cochinita pibil, which is, for all intents and purposes, just a Mexican version of pulled pork.
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Old 12-06-2014, 06:35 AM   #19
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When I can get really thick ones, I'll brine them, then cut a nice pocket in them. I'll make a stuffing, usually including apples and bake them, using extra stuffing as dressing. Served with rotkohl.
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Old 12-06-2014, 07:23 AM   #20
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I love the flavor of pork. As has been stated by everyone who has responded, lean pork is very easy to overcook, resulting in dry, tough meat. But there are several ways to prevent this. Here are a few tips.

1. In the future, purchase pork steaks, as they have better fat marbling and are more tender than are the chops.

2. Pan-Frying - This can be done successfully by several techniques
a. Sear in a hot pan for about 4 minutes per side, or until juices just
turn clear as they ooze out the top. Remove from the pan to a
serving plate and allow to rest 5 minutes before serving.
b. Pan sear in hot pan for 1 minute per side, then turn the heat to
medium, and add a tbs. or 3 of your favorite wine, or broth. Cover
and simmer for about 5 more minutes. Remove and serve.
c. Dip in egg-wash, then flour, and fry in a half inch of cooking oil over
medium heat until the coating is well browned. Remove from the pan
and serve.
d. Sear un a hot pan for about two minutes per side, then add your
favorite gravy, or sauce, or creamy soup. Cover and simmer for 15
minutes more.

3. Braising - Season, then sear the chops on both sides to a light brown.
Add broth or soup, cover, and place into the oven at 325' F. Braise for
30 minutes.

4. It was mentioned before, and seems like cheating. But Shake & Bake
for pork produces juicy and flavorful pork chops.

5. Grill - I do mine on a Webber Kettle, over a direct bed of hot charcoal.
Simply season the chops (salt, pepper, sage, thyme, etc.) and place
directly over the fire. Cover and close all vents to half open position.
Grill about 5 mintues per side. You'll know the chops are done when
juices begin to run clear on top. REmove to platter and let rest for 5
minutes before serving.

6. Velvet - cut chops into thin strips. Create a marinade of soy sauce, vinegar, onion, garlic, brown sugar, and cornstarch. Play with the amounts of each until it tastes good to you. Place the pork strips into the marinade and let it hang out in the fridge for 30 minutes.

Heat oil to 320' F. Place the strips into the hot oil and poach them until the cornstarch coating turns opaque. Remove to drain on paper towels. Serve with rice, and stir-fried veggies. These pork strips can be coated with sauces such as sweet & sour, teriyaki, peanut, maple glaze, etc.

7. Tempura Pork - Cut pork into 1/2" cubes. Lightly season with salt and 5-spice powder. In a large bowl, combine 1/2 cup flour, 1/2 cup cornstarch, 1/2 tsp. salt, and 2 tsp. double acting baking powder. Add 1 cup water and stir to a smooth batter. Place pork cubes into the batter. Drop coated pieces into hot oil and fry until golden brown. serve with your favorite sauce.

All of these will give you tender and juicy pork. Hope one of these will help.

Seeeeeya; Chief Longwind of the North
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