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Old 12-06-2014, 07:57 AM   #21
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Breaded and baked but my favorite is
Lay them in a baking dish put in some baby carrots, cut up potatoes, chopped onion, and then cover with sauerkraut. salt and pepper. cover and bake till all is done , I sometimes add a small can of diced tomatoes.
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Old 12-06-2014, 09:35 AM   #22
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My new favorite way is to sous vide them to 138F. Then sear in a screaming hot CI skillet on both side and the edges.
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Old 12-06-2014, 12:15 PM   #23
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Originally Posted by Roll_Bones View Post
Pork chops should not be over cooked, unless it is your intention to cook them for a very long time. Pork is as safe as beef today and can be cooked medium, as it should be.

Your pork chops can be seasoned and fried in olive oil for just a few minutes per side depending on thickness.
Do not over cook. Allow the chops to rest as you would a steak. You could saute some onions and peppers in the same pan to top them with.
You can also make a quick sauce while they sit.
They will be tender and juicy if you do not over cook them and allow them to rest for a little bit before serving.
The parasite responsible for trichinosis lives in the muscle tissue. It is killed at 137F (58C). It is recommended that pork be cooked to at least 150-155F (66-68C). The last case of trichinosis in Canadian pork was in the 1990s and was not a commercially-raised pig. Wild game should also be cooked above 137F (58C) to kill the parasite as well. China has the highest number of trichinosis cases on an annual basis. Hmmm...does China export pork?
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Old 12-06-2014, 12:30 PM   #24
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It used to be recommended to cook pork to the 150-160F mark. But in 2011, the USDA lowered the pork guidelines to 145F. They no longer tell you to overcook it.
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Old 12-06-2014, 12:41 PM   #25
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The China has the highest number of trichinosis cases on an annual basis. Hmmm...does China export pork?
No. They just bought Smithfield Foods here in Virginia. Some think it's so they can import the pork and leave the waste here.
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Old 12-06-2014, 12:41 PM   #26
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It used to be recommended to cook pork to the 150-160F mark. But in 2011, the USDA lowered the pork guidelines to 145F. They no longer tell you to overcook it.
The Canadian Safe Food handling guidelines recommend higher temps than that. Canadian pork is considered to be the safest pork in the world.
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Old 12-06-2014, 12:56 PM   #27
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The Canadian Safe Food handling guidelines recommend higher temps than that. Canadian pork is considered to be the safest pork in the world.
According to the CDC, between 2008 and 2010, the average number of trichinosis cases in the US averaged 20 per year. That's 20 cases in a population of 300+ million - and not all of those were from pork.

Frankly, I'm not terribly worried.
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Old 12-06-2014, 11:04 PM   #28
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We have our pork chops cut to 1", which is thin enough that I don't worry much about temp. I worry more about overcooking. Plus our piggies are raised well by a friend and cut by a trusted and very clean butcher, so no worries about safety.

The shoulder chops I like to bury in sauerkraut and bake slow. Braised 'back-end' chops are my after work go-to. Sprinkled w/ granulated garlic, rosemary and S&P, browned and braised in the frying pan with a bit of the white wine of the day (gives me an excuse to pour a second glass ).
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Old 12-07-2014, 12:17 AM   #29
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Ah... pork chops. I'm one dimensional, Shake 'N Bake. BTW, I only buy bone in loin pork chops. I've never found boneless chops as tasty, same with boneless chicken and turkey. I even buy bone in pork chops for pork strips (sweet 'n sour pork,etc).

I'm kinda lost not using Shake 'N Bake, so I'm reading over the posts here. I'd like to pan fry a chop one of these days. My mom's simple pork chop thing for 5 kids and a husband was chops baked in a pan, each covered with a round slice of onion and something else...lemon juice..something acidic. Nothing special as I recall. Pork chops can be hard to get excited over, my mom was a great cook tho.
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Old 12-07-2014, 07:42 AM   #30
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Wife fries them in water or shake and bake. I like to put them in the crock pot with cream of mushroom soup.
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