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Old 01-21-2011, 10:05 AM   #21
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I would also cut it into roasts that allow 2" per person (8" for a family of four).

For this recipe, start the day before (or morning of) and make a simple pork stock. Toss 4-6 pounds of pork bones (available from any decent butcher for next to nothing) with a few tablespoons of oil and a sprinkle of salt, and roast in a 450F oven (turning often) until they are deep golden brown. Put the bones into a pot and add a few cups of water to the pan to scrape up any golden bits - then pour into the pot with the bones. Add just enough water to cover (around 8 cups - 2 quarts). Add half an onion to the pot, and simmer for 8 hours (this takes almost zero attention). Strain, separate the fat/stock (reserving both), and reduce the stock by half to 4-cups. The stock takes much longer than the roast itself, but will make for the tastiest sauce, and most wonderful crust due to browning in pork fat.

(For an 8" Roast)

Preheat your oven to 350F, and let the roast warm on the counter for about an hour. Slice a couple large (3 normal) yellow or spanish onions thinly and reserve. Pat down the roast with paper towels to dry the exterior, and season it all over with kosher salt and freshly ground pepper.

Add 1/4-C of the rendered pork fat (from the stock process) to a pan, and get it hot enough so that you get faint wisps of smoke and a strong pork aroma. Add the roast and brown it all over, then remove the roast to a plate. Reduce the heat to medium-high, add the onions to the pan, sprinkle with kosher salt, and mix them around to bring up the brown bits and oils from the pan (add a bit more fat if needed). Cook them until they have wilted and become slightly translucent. Nestle the roast back into the center of the pan (pouring any oils/juices as well from the plate), and pop it into the oven. Roast until the center reaches 142-145F (use a good instant-read thermometer... this is the most important part!).

Once it reaches temperature, pull the pan from the oven and remove the roast to a plate away from the oven to rest. Put the pan with the golden-brown onions over medium heat, and add 1/2-C of Hard Cider, Riesling, or good Ale to deglaze it - simmer until it almost completely evaporates. Add 2-C of the reduced stock to the pan along with a couple tablespoons of Dijon mustard. Bring to a simmer and whisk it until the mustard has incorporated and the sauce looks to have thickened a bit. Pour everything in a blender (or use a bowl and immersion blender), and blend until it's smooth (the onions will thicken it). Add more of the reduced stock to adjust the consistency, along with some S&P to taste.

Then slice the roast into thick medallions (there should be a barely-noticeable blush of pink), and serve with the sauce and sides (I like roasted brussels sprouts and mashed potatoes!).
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Old 01-26-2011, 08:38 PM   #22
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I want to thank everyone for the great tips, suggestions, and recipes. I ended up using a recipe I got online which I will post here for anyone interested. It came out great! My roast was boneless but it still worked out great. It took less time to cook which may be why. I would like to try it another time with a bone in roast.

Garlic and Spice Rubbed Pork Loin Roast recipe by Ryan Hardy

(Ryan Hardy first tasted a version of this succulent pork from a street vendor in Siena, Italy. "It changed the way I thought about food," he says. "It was fatty and sweet, spicy and succulent, smoky and salty - all at the same time." Hardy uses the rub on other kinds of pork cuts, including the shoulder and leg, but the bone in pork roast is the most dramatic; he often wraps a piece of pork belly around the side to make the meat extra juicy.)

Ingredients

6 garlic cloves, coarsely chopped
2 T coarsely chopped rosemary
1 T whole fennel seeds
1 tsp ground fennel
2 tsp crushed red pepper
2 tsp freshly ground pepper
3/4 cup extra virgin olive oil
1 10-rib pork loin roast (5 1/2 lbs) --
chine bone removed, fat trimmed to 1/4",
rib bones frenched
Salt

Directions

Preheat the oven to 400 degrees. In a mini processor, combine the garlic, rosemary, fennel seeds, ground fennel, crushed red pepper, black pepper and olive oil and process to a paste. Set the pork roast on a large rimmed baking sheet and cut shallow score marks all over the fat. Spread 1 T of the garlic paste on the underside of the roast; spread the remaining paste all over the scored fat and meaty parts of the roast. Season all over with salt.

Roast the pork, fat side up, for 1 hour. Reduce the oven temperature to 325 degrees and roast the pork for about 35 minutes longer, or until an instant-read thermometer inserted into the thickest part of the meat registers 150 degrees. Transfer the roast to a carving board and let rest for 15 minutes. Carve the roast into chops and serve at once. (The uncooked herb-rubbed pork can be covered and refrigerated overnight. Bring to room temperature before roasting.)

(I put mine at 400 degrees for the one hour and then it took only another 15 minutes for it to cook to 150 degrees internal temp. If I made it again I might cook on 400 degrees for only a half hour and then lower the temp to 325 and cook until it gets to the 150 degrees on the meat thermometer.)
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Old 01-27-2011, 07:52 AM   #23
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BigAL View Post
Ever thought about kinda butterfly'n it out, put some type of stuffing(not dressing) like sausage, herbs, etc then roll up and cook? I've never done it but would like to. I don't do many loins but when I do I put it on the smoker at 225-275* and cook to about 142-145, tent, and rest for a good 15min. Might even want to only go to 140 expecting a 5* rise in temp, carry over.

Another idea might be to cut into about 1.5-2" "steaks", and stuff those like a stufffed pork chop.

Just ideas, ideas I'd like to try but never have.

Good luck, take pix!
How's this look to ya BigAl ?





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Old 01-27-2011, 10:36 AM   #24
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Quote:
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How's this look to ya BigAl ?






What's the stuffing here? Gorgeous pix!
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Old 01-27-2011, 11:11 AM   #25
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Your Typical Sausage Stuffing, but if my Mom is present, I use an Amish Bread Stuffing Recipe..........
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Old 01-27-2011, 01:49 PM   #26
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Your Typical Sausage Stuffing, but if my Mom is present, I use an Amish Bread Stuffing Recipe..........
Amish Bread Stuffing Recipe sounds good. Would you post the recipe, please? I love stuffing.
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Old 01-27-2011, 04:09 PM   #27
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I always like to take several slices from one end, very thin. Freeze. When you later thaw:

Pound a little. Good for schnitzels, roulades, tonkatsu.

Or cut into thin strips for stir fries or stroganof.
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Old 01-27-2011, 04:28 PM   #28
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Originally Posted by Zhizara View Post
Amish Bread Stuffing Recipe sounds good. Would you post the recipe, please? I love stuffing.

Not sure where to post this,

AMISH STUFFING
2 qt. bread crumbs
1/4 c. cooked, diced carrots
1/2 c. celery, finely cut
3 eggs, beaten
1 c. cooked diced potatoes (salted)
1 c. chicken (cooked skinned and finely cut)
1/4 c. parsley (finely cut), I use dry
2 c. milk
Brown bread crumbs in butter (don't substitute), turn often. Beat eggs, add milk, salt and
pepper. Mix it all together. Put 1/4 c. butter in pan and brown it. Then pour dressing in.
Bake at 350 to 375 degrees until it is brown all around.
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Old 01-28-2011, 12:00 AM   #29
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That sounds really good, LT. Copied, pasted & printed. I'll put it on the fridge to read while nuking things after I update my grocery list.

Thanks so much!
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Old 01-28-2011, 11:51 AM   #30
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That sounds really good, LT. Copied, pasted & printed. I'll put it on the fridge to read while nuking things after I update my grocery list.

Thanks so much!
I should mention that, while my Mom LOVES the stuff, I'm not really fond of it; a little too bland for my taste.........
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