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Old 08-17-2007, 09:55 AM   #11
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Miss June, not to disagree in the least. However if you get the temp. to 160 in the deepest part of the ham, then the rest of the hog would be (hopefully) in the 185* to 200* (pullable) range. With the skin & fat in place hopefully again it would not be dried out. Just my experience. Anyway...


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Old 08-17-2007, 09:59 AM   #12
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another one to warn about securing the beast.
we always used a roll of steel wire, like the kind used to hang pictures, to secure our pig to the spit rod. we'd tie it in several places along it's length, like you would do a roast in the oven. the head, the shoulders, the mid section, then the butt/legs all had a wire wrap or 2. have the wire ready in case something starts to flop as it is getting cooked, before it falls into the fire.

it won't be practical, to stuff a pig that large. it's not like a little suckling pig. 60-70 lbs. is a good size, but the body cavity with be somewhat open, with not enough skin to hold in your stuffing.

something you may want to look into is a good mop sauce, like honey dijon. make buckets of it, and just keep slathering the thing, inside and out as it cooks. you'll have battles to the death for the skin when it's done.
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Old 08-17-2007, 10:07 AM   #13
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Are you using lump charchoal or briquettes?
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Old 08-18-2007, 11:04 AM   #14
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We'll be using lump Apple and Cherry as well as supplementing it with standard charcoal.

As far as stuffing the pig I was told it would be a great idea. Since we'll be tying the pig to the spit and will be using a needle & twine or steel wire to fasten the legs, spine, head, etc to the spit we should also use it to sew the cavity closed as well. The cavity should be sewn shut anyways as to help cook more evenly from the outside in.

I was also thinking about an injection of some sort. I've been very successful with injecting chickens. At the very least I'd cut some slits in the skin & fill with garlic and / or herb butter.

In any case I have been told repeatedly to BASTE, BASTE, BASTE! I'll have to come up with a good mop sause as suggested by Bucky. Honey Dijon Mustard sounds fantastic!!!
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Old 08-18-2007, 11:05 AM   #15
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Again, my biggest concern at this point is time & temp.
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Old 08-18-2007, 11:22 AM   #16
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Plan on devoting a full day....and some backup relief!


Have fun!!!
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Old 08-18-2007, 12:49 PM   #17
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I wouldn’t cut slits in the skin! As it cooks it tightens, and I’ve seen many skins rip apart and develop larges holes because of a small tear. To make sure the skin stays all in one piece, I’d avoid cutting slits in it. Use an injector if you want, but I’d suggest injecting it from the inside cavity to avoid piercing the skin.

Since you are concerned with presentation, and the skin seems important to you, then you’ll want to be really careful to leave it in tact so that it doesn’t split and destroy your presentation.

Here are some examples from the web.

Mangled skin.

Slits in the skin pulling open.

Decent skin, but some splits.

Perfect skin.

And another perfect skin.
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Old 08-18-2007, 12:51 PM   #18
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With large pieces of meat, I've had better results using lump charchoal or logs. For one, there's no need to start the lump in a chimney, just dump it on. I can get a hotter, more controllable temperature using lump. Also, there is very little ash, whereas using briquettes you'll need to remove some of the ash to keep from smouldering. Use a small sturdy metal trash can placed on dirt away from any flammables. It will take a day or so for that ash to cool.
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Old 08-18-2007, 01:02 PM   #19
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Pig Roast in my neck of the woods..... as featured on Food Network, too:

http://http://cuban-christmas.com/pigroast.html
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Old 08-18-2007, 02:26 PM   #20
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For great crisp skin I like to baste with a big chunk of bacon dipped in beer.
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