"Discover Cooking, Discuss Life."

Go Back   Discuss Cooking - Cooking Forums > Recipes & Ingredients > Beef, Pork, Lamb & Venison > Pork
Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
 
Old 08-16-2007, 04:25 PM   #1
Senior Cook
 
Home chef's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2004
Location: USA,Indiana
Posts: 267
Question I'm going to cook my first whole pig! Help?

I'm sorry I haven't ben around very much lately. I have been rediculously swamped with work, work, family, work, housework, work, family, work, etc...

Anyways, it's my turn to cook for our 7th anual block party. I was deemed head chef in charge of cooking a whole pig The pig will be about 60 to 75 pounds. I'd like to stuff it with fragrant fruits like apples, oranges, limes, etc. as well as plenty of herbs & spices (GARLIC). I will be using a rotissirie over charcoal. Of course the skin needs to be super delicious and crisp and the inside needs to be nothing short of perfect.

Any ideas on prep, cooking time & temp, favorite recipes, or any other hints & ideas to help me along. Oh, the party is next Saturday so time is definitely NOT on my side right now LOL.

__________________

__________________
Cheers, Christopher A. Kinkade, Griffith, IN USA
"The difference between a cook and a chef is understanding what's going on." - Alton Brown
Home chef is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-16-2007, 04:42 PM   #2
Executive Chef
 
Join Date: Oct 2006
Location: New Jersey
Posts: 4,630
Take photos.
__________________

__________________
Jeekinz is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-16-2007, 05:04 PM   #3
Chef Extraordinaire
 
GotGarlic's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2007
Location: Southeastern Virginia
Posts: 16,913
On a spit, eh? My parents had my mom's company party at our house once, when I was about 12, and they cooked a whole pig, which I actually witnessed ... never mind, but we lived in the country at the time, and the pig came from our neighbor two doors over.

Anyway, as I recall, they dug a hole in the backyard and started a charcoal fire in the hole. They put the whole pig in there, covered it up, and cooked it for a day or two. The day of the party, or maybe the day before, they took it out and put it on the rotisserie to crisp the skin. I'll give my dad a call and find out what they actually did - I'm sure my memory is not great, since I wasn't into cooking at the time
__________________
The trouble with eating Italian food is that five or six days later you're hungry again. ~ George Miller
GotGarlic is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 08-16-2007, 05:10 PM   #4
Master Chef
 
Join Date: Jul 2006
Location: Metro New York
Posts: 8,764
Send a message via Yahoo to ChefJune
I've never made a whole pig, but if I were going to do that, I would be googling all over for a recipe for "Lechon," which is the roast pig, Filipino style. It is SO delicious. I know that's how I'd like to do it....
__________________
Wine is the food that completes the meal.
ChefJune is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-16-2007, 05:18 PM   #5
Head Chef
 
keltin's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2007
Location: Down South in Alabama
Posts: 2,285
Send a message via AIM to keltin
I cooked a whole one once with my brother at his place last year for the fourth. We built a cinder block pit and a pig holder. We butterflied the pig and cooked it that way. We got the idea from this site. It worked well and is fairly easy to do.

I take it you’re using a large rotisserie over a fire pit? This site gives some good pointers. One of the most important tips being that you have to truss the whole pig well. As it cooks and gets tender, it will pull away from the bone and can fall off the spit. The site talks about how you’ll need to secure the backbone to the spit, tie the legs and head to the spit and sew up the body cavity. Good info.
__________________
keltin is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-16-2007, 08:04 PM   #6
Senior Cook
 
Home chef's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2004
Location: USA,Indiana
Posts: 267
Yea, we're cooking it over charcoal with a rotisserie. We already have the rotisserie lined up so changing plans isn't really possible unless we spend the money to rent a flat grill.
__________________
Cheers, Christopher A. Kinkade, Griffith, IN USA
"The difference between a cook and a chef is understanding what's going on." - Alton Brown
Home chef is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-16-2007, 08:56 PM   #7
Chef Extraordinaire
 
Uncle Bob's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2006
Location: Small Town Mississippi
Posts: 17,392
It must be emphasized. Secure it well to a heavy duty rotisserie!Have Fun & Good Luck!
__________________
There is only one Quality worse than Hardness of Heart, and that is Softness of Head.

Kool-Aid...Think Before You Drink
Uncle Bob is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-16-2007, 11:27 PM   #8
Head Chef
 
Join Date: Jul 2007
Location: Des Moines Iowa
Posts: 1,214
I have seen a whole pig roasted on a spit and the wrapped it in chicken wire and tied it with wire (baling wire) so nothing fell out and the skin was crisp
LOof luck A meat thermometer is vary handi to have 160*F is about right in the thickest part of the hog.
__________________
Cook with passion or don't cook at all
Dave Hutchins is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-17-2007, 08:58 AM   #9
Senior Cook
 
Home chef's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2004
Location: USA,Indiana
Posts: 267
Yea, I heard the chicken wire pulls the skin off. The skin is either the best part or the second best part of the pig. I don't want to damage that. Plus, it kinda makes for a poor looking presentation whileit's rotating on the spit. I know it will be covered and all but when you have to open the cover to baste I want to see this beautiful golden tan carcass glistening with skin so perfect.
__________________
Cheers, Christopher A. Kinkade, Griffith, IN USA
"The difference between a cook and a chef is understanding what's going on." - Alton Brown
Home chef is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-17-2007, 09:24 AM   #10
Master Chef
 
Join Date: Jul 2006
Location: Metro New York
Posts: 8,764
Send a message via Yahoo to ChefJune
I've never seen one done with chicken wire. and if you have the deepest part done to 160, the entire remainder of the pig will be stringy and dried out! I'd use a digital thermometer and set it for 150. The pig will continue to cook for quite some time after it's removed from the spit, and will easily reach 160 inside.

Check the Pork Council's web site if you have questions.
__________________

__________________
Wine is the food that completes the meal.
ChefJune is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Tags
None

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off



» Discuss Cooking on Facebook

Our Communities

Our communities encompass many different hobbies and interests, but each one is built on friendly, intelligent membership.

» More about our Communities

Automotive Communities

Our Automotive communities encompass many different makes and models. From U.S. domestics to European Saloons.

» More about our Automotive Communities

Marine Communities

Our Marine websites focus on Cruising and Sailing Vessels, including forums and the largest cruising Wiki project on the web today.

» More about our Marine Communities


Copyright 2002- Social Knowledge, LLC All Rights Reserved.

All times are GMT -5. The time now is 07:34 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 4
Copyright ©2000 - 2016, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.