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Old 08-20-2008, 07:34 PM   #11
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We have to prep a lot of pork at the same time and we keep it in plastic tubs. When there is a marinade on the meat it seems to stay fresher longer.
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Old 08-20-2008, 08:35 PM   #12
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Rather than keeping the pork in a marinade, keep it in a brine. The brine is simply a saline solution (salt water), and can have ingredients such as onion and garlic, along with dried herbs and spices.

A marinade usually contains an acidic ingredient, such as wine, vinegar, citric acid, etc. The acid reacts with the outer tissue of the meat, tightening it into a dense structure that inhibits the penetration of the solution into all but the very outer layer of meat. Two to three hours in a marinade is all you need to get the flavor from that marinade. Further marinading is a waste of time.

But a brine will completely saturate the meat tissue, distributing its flavor componants throughout the meat. The salt will act as a preservative and prevent microbial growth if mixed in sufficient quantity. Also, you can add flavorings such as soy, or liquid smoke to a brine if you want.

But even with a brine, you need to be careful. The flavors must be ballanced to avoid creating an overly salty product. I can't give you the proper proportion of salt to water off the top of my head, but there are a number of people here who can.

Flavors that will work with your list of ingredients include most hot peppers, fresh or dried, onion, sage, thyme, rosemary, brown sugar, honey, mustard powder, garlic, and several others. Just remember that pork has a fairly delicate flavor, and can easily be overwhelmed if over spiced. Also, and this is of ultimate importance, do not overcook the meat. Use a meat thermometer and remove the pork from the heat source, be it grill, oven, broiler, or frying pan, when the internal temp reaches 145 degrees F. You can bring it up to 150 if you want, but much more than that and the meat will begin to dry out and toughen. Also, pork reacts favorably to a quick sear, with a bit of salt, to brown the outside of the meat. This adds wonderful flavor.

Hope that helps.

Seeeeeya; Goodweed of the North
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Old 08-20-2008, 08:41 PM   #13
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I have to disagree GW. Keeping food in a brine longer than needed makes the texture unpalatable. For pork chops I would not go any longer than 3 hours and even that might be too much for some. 2 hours would be better.

As far as the salt having preservative properties, in order for it to really make a difference the salt would have to be in quantities much greater than what anyone would want to eat.

Keeping the pork in a marinade does not keep it any fresher. The best it will do is help to mask any off smells that might be present giving the impression that it is fresher.
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Old 08-20-2008, 09:10 PM   #14
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I have to disagree GW. Keeping food in a brine longer than needed makes the texture unpalatable. For pork chops I would not go any longer than 3 hours and even that might be too much for some. 2 hours would be better.

As far as the salt having preservative properties, in order for it to really make a difference the salt would have to be in quantities much greater than what anyone would want to eat.

Keeping the pork in a marinade does not keep it any fresher. The best it will do is help to mask any off smells that might be present giving the impression that it is fresher.
I agree completely with your comments about the marinade. And I believe, that with the brine, you are probably correct as well. Now that I think about it, I had a Country smoke ham, the real thing, one time, while I lived in Washington State. It had been soaked in a very strong brine, nad then smoked in a true smokehouse. We had to boil it to remove much of the salt before it was edible.

But brining is still a great way to add flavor. And I know that there are a host of sites on the internet that can give proper ratios of salt to water.

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Old 08-20-2008, 09:14 PM   #15
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Originally Posted by Goodweed of the North View Post

But brining is still a great way to add flavor.
I can not disagree with that!
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Old 08-21-2008, 12:15 AM   #16
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Originally Posted by krichardson View Post
I'm actually a cook at a small restaurant inside of a grocery store. My boss puts together most of the menu, but he doesn't eat pork either. I've been a vegetarian for 5 years and plan on being one for quite some time so I won't be doing any sampling of the dish. I was thinking of a marinade because the meat stays fresher longer in a marinade the way we store it. The olive oil salt pepper and thyme sounds great kitchenelf! Only thing is I hate preparing thyme! Oh well if it tastes good it's worth it!
Leave the sprigs whole, leave the garlic smashed/crushed - call it "rustic" something or other

Unless you go the standard soy sauce, maybe even a bit of ketchup?, some canola oil or light olive oil, I can even see some dry mustard in there, and brown sugar? I'm trying to keep costs down for you or I'd add some toasted sesame oil, sesame seeds, dry sherry, and spring onions in there too! Then, they really can't last days...they would be some pretty "saturated" chops!
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Old 08-21-2008, 08:37 AM   #17
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Barbecue Pork Chops Recipe
2 1/2 cups water
2 tablespoons brown sugar
2 tablespoons oil
1/4 cup vinegar
2 1/2 teaspoons salt
1/4 cup chopped onion or 2 tablespoons onion powder
2 1/2 teaspoons black pepper
2 teaspoons Worcestershire sauce
1 teaspoon dry mustard
2 teaspoons chili powder
1/2 teaspoons hot pepper sauce
1/2 teaspoons red pepper
1 clove garlic or 1 tablespoon powdered garlic
10 (1-inch thick) pork chops

Combine all ingredients except for the pork chops and bring to a rolling boil. Remove from the heat and cool. Refrigerate sauce overnight to blend flavors.
Heat a grill to medium-high heat.
Apply sauce to chops with dish mop or paint brush. Grill to desired doneness, about 5 minutes per side for medium-well. Baste with sauce each time they are turned.
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Old 08-21-2008, 09:54 AM   #18
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Never thought I would be disagreeing with a fellow Michigander (Goodweed of the North) but I have to go with GB on this one. Storing meat in brine for longer than 3 to 6 hours will turn it to mush and alter the taste so much you wouldn't want to eat it. I'm wondering how long the poster is planning on storing chops? Why not just freeze them and thaw as needed?
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