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Old 12-14-2008, 06:14 PM   #1
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ISO help for ROASTED pork shoulder

That is, not steamed or pot-roasted pork shoulder.

When I was a kid, I had to cook dinners for my father and brother. I had no idea what I was doing.

Any roast that Dad bought (they would all be the least expensive cuts), I'd toss into a roasting pan and into a 350 degree oven for 2 hours. Seemed like a good rule of thumb at the time.

One of the things we had a lot, was a fresh pork shoulder, the kind with the thick skin. When I was done with it, the skin was crispy and delicious, and the pork was juicy, sliceable, and tender.

I haven't roasted a pork shoulder in the oven since I was a kid. Now, I have a hankering for one, and all the recipes I've found (like this one Garlic-Roasted Pork Shoulder Recipe at Epicurious.com ) say to COVER the roast for a couple of hours. I know I didn't do that.

I'm tempted to try my "luck of the ignorant" technique again, but am looking for other opinions.

????

Lee

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Old 12-14-2008, 06:25 PM   #2
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Slow and low is the best.

I know alot of people rub it down and what not. then cover it for a few hours. then like the last couple of hours uncover it to get the crispy skin and nice tender meat.

i havent done but like you i have a hankering. jsut got ot get some cash and an appietite to have it for a week straight since ill be the only one eating it.
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Old 12-14-2008, 06:38 PM   #3
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Miss Lee my approach would be just like BBQing it....Give it a little light, simple rub...Put it in a shallow roasting pan...Set the oven at 250* or less...close the door and forget about it...Several hours later...take a peek to see where you are....

Then again the 350* for less time may give you the crispy, sliceable, result you want....

One thing is certain...Fire control want be an issue!!!
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Old 12-14-2008, 06:40 PM   #4
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I don't know how long ago you're talking about, Lee, but pork has changed in the last number of years. It has had a lot of the fat bred out of it--think "the other white meat" marketing blitz--and will not cook the same way as years ago. The same cut that would have been moist and tender might now be dry and chewy if cooked in the same way. Just food for thought.
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Old 12-14-2008, 08:33 PM   #5
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Lee:

Vera Blue posted a recipe for a pork shoulder in one of her "My parents are visiting" threads that might fit your needs.

I just checked Food TV and found this Tyler Florence recipe. Apparantly he uses the same method you used years ago. Maybe that's where he got the idea.
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Old 12-14-2008, 08:42 PM   #6
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I roast in the oven sitting directly on the rack. On the next level down is a 13 x 9 pan filled half way with apple juice. Depending on the size it has taken as long as 20 hours at 225 degrees F. I just rub in salt, pepper, and olive oil and let the low and slow work its magic. My goal is no less than 190 degree internal temp. My PERFECT temp is at 200-210 degrees F.
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Old 12-14-2008, 08:42 PM   #7
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I have no idea, Lee, but I think back to that super thick, crispy pork skin all the time. It was a coveted favorite at my grandmother's house years ago. If you figure it out, let me know (please).
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Old 12-15-2008, 10:45 AM   #8
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I haven't done a pork shoulder, but when I do a pork roast I do it like I do beef. Crank the oven to 450 for about 15 minutes and then drop it to 325 for the rest of the time. I do about 15 minutes/lb for a pork roast, but I always test the temp somewhere in the middle. Thats what I'd do. Oh, and maybe crank the oven for about 10 minutes at the end to get that skin nice and crackling.
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Old 12-15-2008, 11:40 AM   #9
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I do mine similar to Alix but I Start the pork at 500F then drop it to 250-260F. It crusts over nicely...
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Old 12-15-2008, 11:40 AM   #10
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Heyyyyyy, thanks everyone! Okay, I'm inspired!

Off to get a roast for tonight. I'll let you know!

Lee
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