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Old 05-09-2007, 07:08 AM   #1
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ISO: Pork chops and pork gravy information

I have some boneless pork chops and I'm thinking about just serving it with a basic brown gravy. I have beef broth. They don't have pork broth "lol". How do I turn my beef gravy into pork gravy?

Also, any tips on cooking the pork chops. They are fairly small. I have baked them before and pan fried them usually in a stir fry. I never know when these little fella's are done in the oven though. I have a better sense of when chix is done for some reason.

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Old 05-09-2007, 08:42 AM   #2
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For starters, you might want to brine your chops. Make the brine with one cup of HOT water, and 2 T of salt. When the salt has dissolved, add 3 c of cold water, and place the chops in a non-reactive container, and cover with the brine. Soak for a couple hours. Remove the chops, pat dry with some paper towels, season to taste with your favorite seasonings, and cook how you normally do. If you want, you can flavor the brine by boiling the first cup of water with the salt, some garlic, black pepper, and any other herbs/spices that you like. Procede as directed. I like to use garlic, pepper, thyme, and rosemary for pork.

I rarely have pork stock on half, but if you just mix half beef and half chicken stock, it'll be close.

If the chops are to thin to temp with a probe thermometer, just poke it with your finger. If it's nice and firm, it's done. If you brine your chops, you can actually overcook them, and they'll still be nice and juicy.
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Old 05-09-2007, 09:37 AM   #3
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Quote:
Originally Posted by AllenOK
For starters, you might want to brine your chops. Make the brine with one cup of HOT water, and 2 T of salt. When the salt has dissolved, add 3 c of cold water, and place the chops in a non-reactive container, and cover with the brine.
that is very interesting. I have one question though. I understood everything except the part about a non-reactive container. What does that mean? Sorry to sound ignorant.
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Old 05-09-2007, 10:35 AM   #4
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Ok, here is what I have done to make pork chops and gravy... old recipe I learned from my mom. Brown the pork chops in a skillet with a bit of oil, salt, and pepper. After each side is seared, (all of your pork chops have been browned) add them all back into the pan and add a couple of cups of water or stock. I usually use water because your chops are gonna simmer a bit, thus making pork stock. After about 10 minutes of simmering for small chops, 15 to 20 for larger ones, removed chops. Make a slurry of corn starch and water, usually about 2 T to 1/2 cup. Bring your broth to a simmer again and slow add the slurry. It will start to thinken up and now you have some home made pork gravy!!! You may need to add a bit of salt or pepper to flavor it up a bit, but it works. AllenOKs idea is great too!!!
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Old 05-09-2007, 11:00 AM   #5
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Originally Posted by sattie
Ok, here is what I have done to make pork chops and gravy..
I wonder if you could still brine them and than cook that way. Is that possible I wonder? Would it make a difference?
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Old 05-09-2007, 11:58 AM   #6
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If you dredge your chops in seasoned flour before you fry them, you'll have a good roux for making gravy. Dump off most of the grease after the chops are done, add enough flour to soak up grease, cook a minute, then add water. Start out with the gravy thin, and cook, stirring, until it reaches desired consistancy. I use the flour left from dredging the chops, as it is already seaoned.
Taste your gravy and re-season, if needed. I sometimes add a pinch of sugar. You'd be surprised at what a difference it can make.
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Old 05-09-2007, 04:02 PM   #7
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Originally Posted by legend_018
I wonder if you could still brine them and than cook that way. Is that possible I wonder? Would it make a difference?
I'm sure you could.. I have never done much brining until I tried frying chicken for the second time in my life.... I have to say it turned out really well. So hey, I would give it a whirl unless someone on here says otherwise!!! LOL!
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Old 05-09-2007, 04:11 PM   #8
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I make mine like Constance all the time, some times I put the chops back in the pan w/the gravy and simmer with lid on for 30 mins. yum !
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Old 05-09-2007, 05:56 PM   #9
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Mmmm, I'll bet the chops are good that way, Barb. If you add some caramelized onions to that, you'll have smothered chops!
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Old 05-09-2007, 06:01 PM   #10
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Quote:
Originally Posted by legend_018
that is very interesting. I have one question though. I understood everything except the part about a non-reactive container. What does that mean? Sorry to sound ignorant.
Not ignorant at all. Just a piece of information you don't have yet.

Non-reactive container would be something made of glass, plastic, stainless steel or enamel-coated. No aluminum, cast-iron, etc. because these can react/interact with the brine and give an off taste to the food and, perhaps, damage the cookware. To be safe, you could brine the food in a heavy-duty plastic zipper-lock bag.
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