"Discover Cooking, Discuss Life."

Go Back   Discuss Cooking - Cooking Forums > Recipes & Ingredients > Beef, Pork, Lamb & Venison > Pork
Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
 
Old 02-06-2007, 10:18 PM   #1
Assistant Cook
 
Join Date: Feb 2007
Posts: 4
ISO What I did wrong

Ok, decided to have some pork loin for dinner. I often cook on a whim, meaning I open the spice cabinet and do what comes. I decided to be a little driffent from the norm, and make a spice mixture.

1 Clove garlic
1/4 tsp. Oregano
Dash of each: Salt, Pepper, Onion Powder
*Work with me on this measurement* A thimble's worth of thinly sliced Ginger.
I say thimble because it was already sliced (asian aisle) and the amount I sliced up would be, truely, just over a thimbles worth. I do not know how much weight or volume I used.
About 1/2 oz of Virgin Olive Oil

I melted my crisco, added the above ingredients, and simmered them for about 5 min, until the garlic was golden. Then I threw my loin slices in (thin, 1/4 inch) and cooked till done, trying not to dry them out. While cooking it smelled FANTASTIC... but the end result, there wasn't too much flavoring IN the peices. There of course was when you bit into the spices, but the meat did not have a flavor like I was intending.

Like I said, I cook on whims, and thought a sauce would go good. I don't know any sauces, but I do know basics. I didn't have any wine, but I did have Disaranno, and I simmered that until reduced in the left over drippings and spices. That stuff's sweet! I was smart enough to put this 'sauce' in a bowl, rather than pour it on. It did not work for the pork, but I think I inadvertantly found a dessert sauce.

Now that you've made it this far, congratulations. My question is, where did I go wrong? I wanted my meat to have the spicey flavoring, espcially the ginger. I'm wondering if I want to use this a marenade, or rub. Any thoughts/suggestions would be greatly appreciated.

__________________

__________________
Thewhtnight is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-06-2007, 10:34 PM   #2
Cooking Links Contest Winner
 
shannon in KS's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2005
Location: Wamego, KS
Posts: 1,196
Send a message via Yahoo to shannon in KS
I am a cook on the whim type too, and realize sometimes I really don't post recipes, because I usually cook on the fly! Sounds to me you might, like you suggested, would rather marinate, then meld your seasonings together right before cooking? Sounds like you permeated your cooking oil rather than your cut of meat. I LOVE ginger, and a lot of it goes in my mouth before it ever hits the pan ha! But my family is not fond of ginger either. I think, again as you suggested a marinade would be better. I think a rub will season the outside of the meat, but will also form a crust on the outside to flavor each bite. The sauce sounds yummy too!
__________________

__________________
~ Shannon

shannon in KS is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-06-2007, 10:40 PM   #3
Assistant Cook
 
Join Date: Feb 2007
Posts: 4
Well, in those reguards with some trial and error... up the mixtures to creat a rub that will coat it better, you notice that it is a sparse amount, but keeping the oil to a minimum... more or less to use it as a 'glue'. Or, you can up the mixtures, and replace with maybe vingar? (I HATE the stuff)... or some other base, maybe a neutral base, so that you can marenade it w/o having to waste 12oz of expensive oil.
__________________
Thewhtnight is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-06-2007, 10:54 PM   #4
Cooking Links Contest Winner
 
shannon in KS's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2005
Location: Wamego, KS
Posts: 1,196
Send a message via Yahoo to shannon in KS
how about a white wine? I ran a search for ginger marinade for pork, and came up with quite a few hits! I am a serious fan of brining meats for at least 24 hours. Any flavor you put in the brine permeates the whole cut of meat, and also tenderizes. Alton Brown has an article on FoodNetwork about brining that is very informative. I bet if you played with a brine recipe and added a good amount of ginger, you would find you would have flavor throughout. Hopefully some more experienced cooks may have more wise advice- I am always experimenting with ideas that pop into my head- but I can't claim they are educated or proven.... hahahaha
__________________
~ Shannon

shannon in KS is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-06-2007, 11:07 PM   #5
Chef Extraordinaire
 
kitchenelf's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2002
Location: North Carolina
Posts: 19,725
Send a message via MSN to kitchenelf
Instead of vinegar make a lime marinade with the herbs you used (without the ginger - that just doesn't sound like it goes to me).

Even if you take salt and pepper and sear the heck out of it on all sides in a screaming hot pan, THEN before putting in a 450 - 500 degree oven slather the herbs on and even a glaze of some kind (pureed raspberries with some adobo sauce from the adobo chili can and sauteed onions and garlic - puree all together and rub this on then the herbs). Finish in the oven for roughly 20 - 25 minutes depending on the size of the pork loin. It's the browned outside that will create the flavor in each bite. A little pink in the middle will create more flavor. Even deglaze the pan with a bit of broth and a pat of butter to pour over the pieces might help moisten and flavor it. Be sure and salt and pepper the juices.
__________________
kitchenelf

"Count yourself...you ain't so many" - quote from Buck's Daddy
kitchenelf is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-23-2007, 10:03 AM   #6
Assistant Cook
 
Join Date: Feb 2007
Posts: 28
I'm with Shannon in KS. Brining make a tremendous amount of difference. The starting point for the brine is 1/2 cup of koshier salt per 1 gallon of water. From there, add whatever you want to flavor it up. Last time I used garlic power and cayenne and was amazed by the difference in taste, tenderness, and moistness.

For a tenderloin, 24 hours is good. Hope this helps.
__________________
sirsmokesalot is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-23-2007, 11:47 AM   #7
Sous Chef
 
Join Date: Dec 2006
Posts: 905
There really isn't much flavor in that to transfer. Need about twice as much garlic and 4X as much ginger. And then maybe some Chinese chili sauce or even soy sauce. And a "carrier", such as some oil. Let it simmer in the oil.
__________________

__________________
Candocook is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Tags
None

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off



» Discuss Cooking on Facebook

Our Communities

Our communities encompass many different hobbies and interests, but each one is built on friendly, intelligent membership.

» More about our Communities

Automotive Communities

Our Automotive communities encompass many different makes and models. From U.S. domestics to European Saloons.

» More about our Automotive Communities

Marine Communities

Our Marine websites focus on Cruising and Sailing Vessels, including forums and the largest cruising Wiki project on the web today.

» More about our Marine Communities


Copyright 2002- Social Knowledge, LLC All Rights Reserved.

All times are GMT -5. The time now is 06:51 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 4
Copyright ©2000 - 2016, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.