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Old 04-25-2014, 12:21 PM   #1
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ISO Your Best Rib Recipe

What is your best rib recipe/technique? I'll start by giving you the recipe that has gotten me "The best I ever ate" comments, and from people I'd never before met (I put it in our Tribal paper).

Best Ribs in SSM

Summer is nearly here, a perfect time to break out the grill. A perennial favorite for this holiday is succulent, smoky spare ribs. Though the baby-back ribs are all the rage these days, the other cut, I believe they’re called Louisiana cut spare ribs, are less expensive, and have more meat on them. When treated properly, in my humble opinion, they beat baby-back ribs for flavor and texture any day of the week.
As every barbecue pit master will tell you, phenomenal ribs take a day’s worth of loving care in a smoker that will cost you a month’s salary, with three hundred pounds of hardwood fuel, right. Wrong. I’m giving you a recipe that will produce fall-off-the-bone tender, juicy, and succulent ribs that require a night in the fridge and 40 minutes in a covered kettle or gas barbecue, and a few sticks picked up from the woods, or a bag of cheap hickory chunks that can be had at the supermarket.
Here’s how I did them two days ago, to rave reviews from guests and family alike (I was told by one guest that these were the only ribs she’d ever had that required no sauce, and by my wife that they were the best ribs she’d ever eaten). Best of all, these are easy to make, and inexpensive. Now what more can a guy ask for?

Smoky Spare Ribs
Ingredients:
2 racks pork spare ribs
3 tbs. salt
4 tbs. mild chili powder
1 cup dark brown sugar
1 tbs. granulated garlic powder
2 tbs. granulated onion powder
1 tbs. rubbed sage
Wood chunks/branches cut into 6-inch lengths, maple, hickory, mesquite, cherry, or tag-alder wood.

Combine the salt, chili powder, brown sugar, garlic, onion, and sage in a bowl and blend together until evenly mixed. This is yoru dry rub mix. Lay out the ribs on a covered working surface. Remove the silver skin from the back of the rack. Rub both sides of the ribs with your dry rub, massaging the seasoning mixture into the meat. Place in a suitably sized plastic bag, and seal. Refrigerate overnight.

To cook, Fire up the grill with two divided beds of charcoal, each pile on opposite sides of the grill, with a four inch space between the piles. Light the charcoal and let it get hot. Place a disposable aluminum bread pan between the charcoal piles and fill half way with water. Put the wood on top of the charcoal piles. Put the grate over the grill.

Place the ribs directly over the drip pan, put the grill cover on and set the vents all to the half-closed position. Cook for 1 hour.

Remove the ribs to a slow cooker, or wrap in heavy-duty foil. If using the slow cooker, cook on low heat for four hours, then remove to a serving platter and enjoy. If wrapping in foil, place the foil pack onto a cookie sheet, and into your oven, et at 290 degrees F. Roast for four hours. Remove and serve.

I’ll let you figure out your favorite side dishes for this meal. Enjoy.

Seeeeeeya; Chief Longwind of the North

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Old 04-25-2014, 06:09 PM   #2
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I'm pretty sure this isn't what you have in mind, but I never had barbequed ribs until I was about 30 years old!

I grew up with ribs and kraut as a winter dish, I suppose because in farm country pigs were usually butchered in late fall or winter.

A rack or two of meaty ribs, if times are tough use meaty fresh pork neck bones.
2 pounds of cold packed sauerkraut, found in the meat case, rinsed and drained
1 large onion thinly sliced
1 or 2 apples peeled, cored and thinly sliced
a generous pinch of caraway seeds

Mix all ingredients and place in a covered casserole or roaster. Top with ribs, generously coat ribs with plenty of freshly ground black pepper and garlic salt. Cover and bake at 325 for approx. 3 hours, or until the meat is falling off the bones. Serve with mashed potatoes, carrot coins and a warm apple dessert on a cold snowy night. In the summer you can crank the air conditioning and put on a sweater!

You can also swap out the apples and add some dried mushrooms that have been reconstituted in a cup of boiling water. Chop the mushrooms fine and mix with the kraut, pour in the broth being careful to leave any sediment in the bottom of the cup.
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Old 04-25-2014, 06:48 PM   #3
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Aunt Bea View Post
I'm pretty sure this isn't what you have in mind, but I never had barbequed ribs until I was about 30 years old!

I grew up with ribs and kraut as a winter dish, I suppose because in farm country pigs were usually butchered in late fall or winter.

A rack or two of meaty ribs, if times are tough use meaty fresh pork neck bones.
2 pounds of cold packed sauerkraut, found in the meat case, rinsed and drained
1 large onion thinly sliced
1 or 2 apples peeled, cored and thinly sliced
a generous pinch of caraway seeds

Mix all ingredients and place in a covered casserole or roaster. Top with ribs, generously coat ribs with plenty of freshly ground black pepper and garlic salt. Cover and bake at 325 for approx. 3 hours, or until the meat is falling off the bones. Serve with mashed potatoes, carrot coins and a warm apple dessert on a cold snowy night. In the summer you can crank the air conditioning and put on a sweater!

You can also swap out the apples and add some dried mushrooms that have been reconstituted in a cup of boiling water. Chop the mushrooms fine and mix with the kraut, pour in the broth being careful to leave any sediment in the bottom of the cup.
If that's your favorite rib recipe, then that's exactly what I'm looking for. I didn't say "your best rib recipe with a dry rub, or bbq ribs, just your best. And it looks like a great recipe, just a little German rather than standard American fare. Nothin' wrong with that.

seeeeeeya; Chief Longwind of the North
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Old 04-27-2014, 09:11 AM   #4
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Aunt bea, I grew up having those in the winter time also
My mom, used the pork of your choice, she use pork chops, country ribs ,pork loin
What ever pork she was in the mood for. Sauerkraut, potatoes, carrots, onions, garlic, salt and pepper. At times she would put a can of chopped tomatoes in there.
soooo good
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Old 04-27-2014, 12:51 PM   #5
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I like dry rubs, not too sweet, any will do. Apply rub to rib rack, Wrap in plastic and chill overnight. Unwrap and place in/on a baking pan/dish. Cover with plastic wrap, enfold in foil, cook in oven until tender (timing depending on size of rib rack). Unwrap, return to oven and roast until nicely browned. Serve with your favorite BBQ sauce for individual dipping/slathering.
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Old 04-27-2014, 02:05 PM   #6
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My family loves the ribs I do with the 2 stage method. After rubbing, or sprinkling with a generous coating of your preferred herbs and spices, I cover tightly and precook them for about an hour at 300, with about an inch of liquid. You can use whatever you want but I usually go with something that contains some tomatoes like juice or diluted crushed. You are going to discard this this anyway so it doesn't really matter. But, I find the acidity of the tomatoes helps to break down the pork meat. One time I had nothing much to braise with so I used half ketchup and half water with some garlic and other spices. This really gave the ribs a nice sweet tang and seemed to tenderize them quite nicely. I use it regularly now.

Then, I transfer them to a grill on low, and sauce and flip until my heart is content and the beer is almost gone... I like to do this grilling step for 45 minutes to an hour so the sauce gets to form a nice thick, sticky glaze, and the exposed bone tips just start to char. It also really picks up the smokey flavor.

There are many other ways, and I have tried many, but this one is always a consistent winner, and very easy. I ask them to be honest and they always have said that they like that technique best.
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Old 04-28-2014, 12:13 PM   #7
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I use dry rub to season it in refrigerator overnight. I put in an oven at about 200 deg. Baking dish with BBQ sauce. Leave in the oven for the whole day. When I come from work I put in on the grill at about 500 deg and baste with the sauce the ribs were cooking in. It is really good if you have no smoker.
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Old 05-02-2014, 07:44 AM   #8
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BBQ ribs get a dry rub, over night in the fridge, warn to room temp, 225F on the smoker. Back ribs take about 3 hours, spares take about 5 hours. Depending on my mood, I may foil them after a couple hours or I may mop them and leave them unwrapped. Sauce is always served at table, if you choose.

Now, I also like to use spares when I make a German style braised kraut dish, along with the sausages.
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Old 05-02-2014, 09:22 AM   #9
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I'm seeing a pattern hear of some pretty great looking rib techniques, all very similar to what I do, with slight modifications. For those who have never cooked ribs, pay attention.

Seeeeeeya; Chief Longwind of the North
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Old 05-02-2014, 10:56 AM   #10
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Rocklobster View Post
My family loves the ribs I do with the 2 stage method. After rubbing, or sprinkling with a generous coating of your preferred herbs and spices, I cover tightly and precook them for about an hour at 300, with about an inch of liquid. You can use whatever you want but I usually go with something that contains some tomatoes like juice or diluted crushed. You are going to discard this this anyway so it doesn't really matter. But, I find the acidity of the tomatoes helps to break down the pork meat. One time I had nothing much to braise with so I used half ketchup and half water with some garlic and other spices. This really gave the ribs a nice sweet tang and seemed to tenderize them quite nicely. I use it regularly now.

Then, I transfer them to a grill on low, and sauce and flip until my heart is content and the beer is almost gone... I like to do this grilling step for 45 minutes to an hour so the sauce gets to form a nice thick, sticky glaze, and the exposed bone tips just start to char. It also really picks up the smokey flavor.

There are many other ways, and I have tried many, but this one is always a consistent winner, and very easy. I ask them to be honest and they always have said that they like that technique best.
I have used a similar method and then finished them in the oven and finally under the broiler for a few minutes. I like to use a pot of white rice to soak up the leftover sauce and braising liquid, sort of a barbequed fried rice. Top the rice with some chopped scallions.

In the fall try using fresh apple cider for your braising liquid, it adds a nice extra layer of flavor. If you feel the need for a little acid add some apple cider vinegar to keep the apple theme going.

I'm starting to get hungry!
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ISO Your Best Rib Recipe What is your best rib recipe/technique? I'll start by giving you the recipe that has gotten me "The best I ever ate" comments, and from people I'd never before met (I put it in our Tribal paper). [B]Best Ribs in SSM[/B] Summer is nearly here, a perfect time to break out the grill. A perennial favorite for this holiday is succulent, smoky spare ribs. Though the baby-back ribs are all the rage these days, the other cut, I believe they’re called Louisiana cut spare ribs, are less expensive, and have more meat on them. When treated properly, in my humble opinion, they beat baby-back ribs for flavor and texture any day of the week. As every barbecue pit master will tell you, phenomenal ribs take a day’s worth of loving care in a smoker that will cost you a month’s salary, with three hundred pounds of hardwood fuel, right. Wrong. I’m giving you a recipe that will produce fall-off-the-bone tender, juicy, and succulent ribs that require a night in the fridge and 40 minutes in a covered kettle or gas barbecue, and a few sticks picked up from the woods, or a bag of cheap hickory chunks that can be had at the supermarket. Here’s how I did them two days ago, to rave reviews from guests and family alike (I was told by one guest that these were the only ribs she’d ever had that required no sauce, and by my wife that they were the best ribs she’d ever eaten). Best of all, these are easy to make, and inexpensive. Now what more can a guy ask for? Smoky Spare Ribs Ingredients: 2 racks pork spare ribs 3 tbs. salt 4 tbs. mild chili powder 1 cup dark brown sugar 1 tbs. granulated garlic powder 2 tbs. granulated onion powder 1 tbs. rubbed sage Wood chunks/branches cut into 6-inch lengths, maple, hickory, mesquite, cherry, or tag-alder wood. Combine the salt, chili powder, brown sugar, garlic, onion, and sage in a bowl and blend together until evenly mixed. This is yoru dry rub mix. Lay out the ribs on a covered working surface. Remove the silver skin from the back of the rack. Rub both sides of the ribs with your dry rub, massaging the seasoning mixture into the meat. Place in a suitably sized plastic bag, and seal. Refrigerate overnight. To cook, Fire up the grill with two divided beds of charcoal, each pile on opposite sides of the grill, with a four inch space between the piles. Light the charcoal and let it get hot. Place a disposable aluminum bread pan between the charcoal piles and fill half way with water. Put the wood on top of the charcoal piles. Put the grate over the grill. Place the ribs directly over the drip pan, put the grill cover on and set the vents all to the half-closed position. Cook for 1 hour. Remove the ribs to a slow cooker, or wrap in heavy-duty foil. If using the slow cooker, cook on low heat for four hours, then remove to a serving platter and enjoy. If wrapping in foil, place the foil pack onto a cookie sheet, and into your oven, et at 290 degrees F. Roast for four hours. Remove and serve. I’ll let you figure out your favorite side dishes for this meal. Enjoy. Seeeeeeya; Chief Longwind of the North 3 stars 1 reviews
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