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Old 01-19-2016, 05:00 PM   #11
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Originally Posted by di reston View Post
I've never done pulled pork, so all advice is most welcome. What cut of pork do I get? My husband sometimes gags on fat, so I would have to take that into account when buying the meat.

Thank you for the replies so far.
It's really important to use a bone-in pork shoulder/butt for this preparation. A leaner cut will not get tender enough to pull. You can cut off some excess fat and, as has been said, much of it will render out while cooking. When you pull it after cooking, you can remove any remaining fat. You will know it's done when the meat pulls easily from the bone.
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Old 01-20-2016, 07:51 AM   #12
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In the smoker or in the oven (on a rack), the fat melts as it cooks to keep the meat moist. The fat drips off the meat as well. When the right internal temperature is reached, the collagen begins to break down. How is the fat dealt with in a crock pot? I can imagine the pork would be swimming in fat. Do you skim as you go?
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Old 01-20-2016, 08:59 AM   #13
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Depending on the size of your slow cooker, this rack might fit. It just barely fits in my 5 qt.

http://www.amazon.com/Roasting-Bakin...3GMYE39C31ZWJC
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Old 01-20-2016, 11:30 AM   #14
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Originally Posted by GotGarlic View Post
It's really important to use a bone-in pork shoulder/butt for this preparation. A leaner cut will not get tender enough to pull. You can cut off some excess fat and, as has been said, much of it will render out while cooking. When you pull it after cooking, you can remove any remaining fat. You will know it's done when the meat pulls easily from the bone.
I totally agree. Use a butt and not a leaner cut.

I make pulled pork all the time for people like your hubby who hate fat.

1. When you pull the meat (make sure it's warm when you do this), it is easy enough to remove visible fat and other icky stuff. I actually do it with a fine-toothed comb, so to speak, and so it takes extra time and effort but it's appreciated by the folks who eat it.

2. De-fat the cooking liquid with a gravy separator. Then mix it back into the pulled meat.
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Old 01-20-2016, 11:36 AM   #15
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Originally Posted by CraigC View Post
In the smoker or in the oven (on a rack), the fat melts as it cooks to keep the meat moist. The fat drips off the meat as well. When the right internal temperature is reached, the collagen begins to break down. How is the fat dealt with in a crock pot? I can imagine the pork would be swimming in fat. Do you skim as you go?
It sits in the fat, but it's not "swimming" in it. It doesn't bother me.
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Old 01-21-2016, 08:41 AM   #16
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While I agree that a pork shoulder (also known as Boston Butt) is best prepared over a low slow fire, the following method is drop dead easy and the result is amazing.
Crock Pot Kalua Pig
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Old 01-21-2016, 12:56 PM   #17
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Pulled pork

When I went to the butcher's today, he showed me a large very thick slice ( would say three inches max) of pork shoulder, skin and fat on, with a rather small piece of marrow bone in the middle(ish). Somehow, from what I infer from everything you have all said, this may not be right, but as I've never done this before I have no idea. Could you describe what the piece of pork should look like so's I can tell the butcher?

If any of you have a picture - I don't want to inconvenience you though - could you let me see it?

Many and grateful thanks to you all for your help

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Old 01-21-2016, 01:07 PM   #18
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A fun Boston Butt is about 7.5 to 8.0 pounds, around 3.5Kg. Part of the shoulder blade should be included.
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Old 01-21-2016, 07:00 PM   #19
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Quote:
Originally Posted by di reston View Post
When I went to the butcher's today, he showed me a large very thick slice ( would say three inches max) of pork shoulder, skin and fat on, with a rather small piece of marrow bone in the middle(ish). Somehow, from what I infer from everything you have all said, this may not be right, but as I've never done this before I have no idea. Could you describe what the piece of pork should look like so's I can tell the butcher?

If any of you have a picture - I don't want to inconvenience you though - could you let me see it?

Many and grateful thanks to you all for your help

di reston

Enough is never as good as a feast Oscar Wilde
In Italy, you may not find many of what we in the US consider "traditional" cuts of pork. It sounds like you have a piece of the Butt. You can roast it or braise it slowly at about 125 C for 2 or 3 hours at least. You want an internal temperature of about 90 C. Then use two forks to shred the meat, season and sauce it as you like.

I've had pulled pork that was shredded almost to mush, and that's how some folks like it. I prefer a coarser shredding, with the shreds about 1-2 inches (3-5 cm) long. That way I can get the flavor of the pork while still making a great barbecue pork sandwich. It's not uncommon to top the pork mixture in the sandwich with cole slaw, and there are many possible variation on that too.
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Old 01-21-2016, 08:36 PM   #20
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http://food.unl.edu/image/image_gall...D1289429576021

This is a pork shoulder, bone in.
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