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Old 10-15-2008, 02:02 AM   #1
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Pulled pork in Magnalite roaster

I have one of these Magnalite 18 Inch Roaster : Spoons 'n Spice Kitchenware

I need to cook 2 boston butts for pulled pork sandwiches and other.

How do I decide on time per pound? Does it differ by having 2 in the pot? Should I have it uncovered for a peroid of time? Anything I should add at the begining?

How would you do this?


Thanks!!!!!

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Old 10-15-2008, 12:34 PM   #2
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My pulled pork recipe--heat the oven to 400. Season your pork roast as desired--I use a mix of brown sugar, salt and pepper and sometimes chili powder. Put the pork roasts (both of them) in the roaster, on a rack, put them in the oven and immediately turn the heat down to 225. I don't cover the pan.

Roast for at least 12 hours--up to 24 is ok. (I usually put mine in the oven just before I go to bed, and eat it either for lunch or dinner.)
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Old 10-15-2008, 12:46 PM   #3
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I would use an open roasting pan with low sides and not cover the meat at all. I cook mine at about 235 F two butts at a time. It takes about 12 hours to get the internal temperature up to about 200 F.

Leaving the pan uncovered will give you a great bark (crust) that is an important part of the pulled pork.
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Old 10-15-2008, 01:06 PM   #4
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I put a rub on the pork in the morning and wrap in plastic wrap and leave it in the fridge until about 8 p.m. I then put the pork in the Magnolite on the rack with the lid on, and let it cook all night at 225 F. When the meat separates from the bones, it's done and ready to be shredded. It generally roasts for 10-12 hours and pretty much just falls apart. I mix in some Sweet Baby Ray's sauce and serve. Great as leftovers.

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Old 10-16-2008, 11:54 PM   #5
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Andy M. View Post
I would use an open roasting pan with low sides and not cover the meat at all. I cook mine at about 235 F two butts at a time. It takes about 12 hours to get the internal temperature up to about 200 F.

Leaving the pan uncovered will give you a great bark (crust) that is an important part of the pulled pork.
What size of butts are you using when you cook 2 at a time? Do you think the high wall pot I have could effect this?



The "rack" you are all talking about, how high from the bottom of the pan should it be? The Magnalite comes with a small spacer, maybe only 1/4 inch. Would this work? Would it hurt if I used that?


Thank you all!!
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Old 10-17-2008, 01:11 AM   #6
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You can't really go by time. Its done when the internal temp reaches 195 to 200 degrees. I cooked some that took 12 hours and others of the same weight that took 19 hours. As they say, "it's done when it's done". A probe thermometer is your best friend.
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Old 10-17-2008, 06:30 AM   #7
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Quote:
Originally Posted by NAchef View Post
What size of butts are you using when you cook 2 at a time? Do you think the high wall pot I have could effect this?

The "rack" you are all talking about, how high from the bottom of the pan should it be? The Magnalite comes with a small spacer, maybe only 1/4 inch. Would this work? Would it hurt if I used that?


Thank you all!!

I buy two butts that weigh about 7-8 pounds each.

The low sides of the pan promote the formation of a crust, a desireable result, all over the butts. You can use a high walled pan but will have a little less crust.

The rack pnly serves to hold the butts out of the fat and allows the heat to circulate around the meat. Any rack will do. You could even cook it with no rack.
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Old 10-17-2008, 07:33 AM   #8
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Andy M (who I almost always agree with), and Sedagive have given you straight answers. Yes you need to get the meat up to a temp of about 190 to 200 degrees F. And this is best accomplished with a meat thermometer. Season only with salt and a little pepper.

If you want the bark, go with Andy M's suggestions and roast in a slow oven until the thermometer reads the right temperature. Remove and pull in a suitably large bowl. If you want a lots of moisture, then roast in your Magnalite pan, with the cover on, again to the proper temperature. If roasting in the pot, I would suggest adding two, whole, chopped onions. They add great flavor.

If roasting in the pot, shred the meat and add all of the broth back into it. Believe me, it will be very moist, but not soupy.

In either case, whether you prefer your pulled pork with or without bark, the traditional way to present the meat is to serve plain, with any sauces and condiments on the side and in separate bowls. This allows everyone to add the flavor they want to their own sandwich, be it a honey/mustard sauce, a honey/vinegar sauce, a sweet, tomato based BBQ sauce, or simply ketchup and mustard.

Pulled pork is wonderful because of its rich flavor, and luxurious mouth feel. The texture is enhanced by the melted fat, and extracted collagen from the bones and connecting tissue. It adds a wonderful viscosity to the meat, which is broken down and supremely tender. It's just good stuff. If you really want to go over the top with this meal, make it in a cast iron pan over charcoal and mesquite in a covered BBQ such as a Webber Kettle, or BGE. Yum.

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Old 10-18-2008, 12:57 AM   #9
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So I would be ok to use a couple of cake pans with the rack inside for the pork to sit on an be ok? What type of pan and rack should I be looking for?

I checked a couple stores today but could not find anything. I am going in to the city tomorrow for bigger selection so what should be on my list?

Sorry, this is my first time cooking it this way and I have to have this ready by Sunday at 4pm

Thanks!!
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Old 10-18-2008, 09:58 AM   #10
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The cake pans will be fine. The only purpose of the pan is to catch the drippings. ANY low sided oven proof pot, pan or whatever will do the trick. I use a roasting pan with a "V" rack but that's just one effective way to do it.
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