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Old 06-17-2010, 11:39 AM   #11
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Hoot was right, ya got a ham. If you want pulled pork, go to the groc store and buy fresh/raw boston butt.

I bet what they have is good, but it won't be pulled pork. Could be good sliced and used similar to canadian bacon? I don't know.

Good luck.
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Old 06-17-2010, 11:42 AM   #12
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BigAL View Post
Hoot was right, ya got a ham. If you want pulled pork, go to the groc store and buy fresh/raw boston butt.

I bet what they have is good, but it won't be pulled pork. Could be good sliced and used similar to canadian bacon? I don't know.

Good luck.
amm I sent another email to the farmer informing him I was thinking of doing a pulled pork and he wrote back: Those smoked shoulders are perfect for that and we have done a few. They melt in your mouth.

He also said they've seared theres and than put low in crock pot and they've come out great. although I was thinking more of the lines of 450 degrees in oven for 45 minutes and than 300 degrees for 2-3 hours.

So the actual farmer is telling me this is a great shoulder to do pulled pork?
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Old 06-17-2010, 11:50 AM   #13
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I agree that it sounds like it's a fresh ham, which is not what you want to use.

A regular supermarket will carry fresh bone-in pork "butts" or "Boston butts" which are actually the shoulder.

There are many ways to prepare pulled pork (smoked, on a grill, in the oven, in a crockpot) but they ALL by definition involve cooking the pork for a very long time at low heat to a very high temp -- like 200.

The goal is to cook it until it falls apart on its own -- the bone should come out with ease and totally clean.

I cook mine on a charcoal grill on indirect heat for 2 hours or so, then finish in a dutch oven in the oven at 275 for another 5 hours in a sort of "mop sauce." I pull the meat when still warm and then mix it back in with the drippings and mop sauce.

If you buy it and cook it at 450 for 45 min and then at 300 for 2-3 hours, you'll have a ham but it will be incapable of becoming real pulled pork.
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Old 06-17-2010, 01:19 PM   #14
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I reckon it's a matter of expectations. If you are looking for pulled pork like in big Al's photos, you will likely be disappointed if you use cured pork.
That is not to say that cured pork won't be good prepared the way you planned or by the method the farmer recommends. It will be very good , but it will be different from what most folks I know call pulled pork.
Which ever way you decide to go will be fine, I am sure.
Please let us know how it turns out.
I hope y'all have a great time!!!
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Old 06-17-2010, 02:11 PM   #15
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It sounds like you have a smoked/brined picnic - which makes some of the best boiled dinner you've ever had!

Toss in 12-quart pot with just enough water to cover and simmer for two and a half hours covered (start counting once you see it begin to "boil"). Add lots of peeled carrots cut into large chunks and continue to simmer for another hour. Add a quartered head of cabbage along with half a dozen peeled medium yukon gold potatoes and cook an additional 30-45 minutes. By this point the meat should be fall-apart tender, the carrots should be tender through, the thickest parts of the cabbage should be soft, and the potatoes should be beginning to fall apart.

Strain everything, separate the broth from the fat, and reduce the broth by about 25%-30%. Return the potatoes, and use an immersion blender to make a nice smooth "gravy". Don't be afraid to add a tablespoon of the rendered fat either! Add a few heaping tablespoons of ground horseradish and brown mustard (more to taste). Season with salt and freshly ground white pepper. Debone/fat the meat, and add it to the gravy along with the carrots and cabbage.

Makes a real hearty stew. Same recipe can be done with 2-3 corned beef briskets (Flat Cut).
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Old 06-17-2010, 04:58 PM   #16
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Don't boil the meat, for the love of God, don't boil the meat. When you make stock what do you do........boil the bajesus out of it w/ veggies to EXTRACT the flavor into the liquid.

I don't know what you all do up there, but it would be much easier to just do it yourself. Buy the farmers product and treat it like canadian bacon, imho. But please, don't boil. I take all your guys' advise(e-ne) about cook'n lobster and crab, do me a favor.

Nick, wtf ya smoke'n? Tell us how that can be good. I'll never try it, but would like to hear wtheck your think'n.
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Old 06-17-2010, 05:07 PM   #17
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if it is cured like corned beef, a "boiled" dinner sounds kinda good (although I would simmer it).
Can you just put it in a roaster (probably too big for a slow cooker) and just cook it that way? It's been smoked, so I wouldn't mess with a whole lot of other flavorings. Just cook it low and slow until done... to YOUR satisfaction. You are the one that will be there, peeking under the lid.
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Old 06-17-2010, 05:19 PM   #18
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Traditional pulled pork is made from a Boston Butt, available at most supermarkets. It's either cooked low and slow over indirect heat with lots of good hardwood smoke (fruitwoods such as cherry or apple, hickory or mesquite, or you can use alser, birch or maple). Cook until a meat thermometer reads an internal temperature of 190' F. Make sure to put a drip pan under the roast to catch drippings.

If making in the oven, yuo can approximate the smoky flavor by using liquid smoke during the cooking process. Again, cook low and slow (about 300 degrees or so) until the 190' internal meat temperature is reached. Remove from the oven and let cool until you can safely handle it. break it into chunks. Season with salt, pepper, and onion.

You can also make this in the slow cooker. Just place in the slow cooker and let cook on medium or lowest "cooking" temperature of your appliance. Season with salt and pepper, and sliced onion. Let cool and pull. Again, smokey flavor can be obtained by using liquid smoke.

To serve traditionally, do not mix any sauces with the pulled pork. Rather, make three sauces to be used as condiments by those making there own sandwiches. Typically, a honey mustard sauce, a tomato based barbecue sauce, and a vinager based barbecue sauce. Serve with cole slaw and baked beans.

Seeeeeeya; Goodweed of the North
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Old 06-18-2010, 08:25 AM   #19
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BigAL - Brined and cold-smoked pig shoulder is commonly used in boiled dinners, I'm surprised you've never heard of cooking brined/cold-smoked meats in this fashion (such as corned beef, although it's not smoked).
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Wyogal - I also simmer my "boiled" dinners, but simmering and boiling cook the meat at exactly the same rate, as both raise the temperature of the fluid to it's saturation point. In my case I make a sauce from the broth, so final clarity isn't an issue.
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Old 06-18-2010, 09:08 AM   #20
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Poaching, Simmering, and Boiling are three different wet cooking methods...Each have their place. Boiling proteins usually produce tough, chewy results...While simmering renders them very tender...

HERE is some information...Click HERE for additional information.
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