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Old 06-19-2010, 05:29 PM   #31
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It sounds like you have a smoked/brined picnic - which makes some of the best boiled dinner you've ever had!

Toss in 12-quart pot with just enough water to cover and simmer for two and a half hours covered (start counting once you see it begin to "boil"). Add lots of peeled carrots cut into large chunks and continue to simmer for another hour. Add a quartered head of cabbage along with half a dozen peeled medium yukon gold potatoes and cook an additional 30-45 minutes. By this point the meat should be fall-apart tender, the carrots should be tender through, the thickest parts of the cabbage should be soft, and the potatoes should be beginning to fall apart.

Strain everything, separate the broth from the fat, and reduce the broth by about 25%-30%. Return the potatoes, and use an immersion blender to make a nice smooth "gravy". Don't be afraid to add a tablespoon of the rendered fat either! Add a few heaping tablespoons of ground horseradish and brown mustard (more to taste). Season with salt and freshly ground white pepper. Debone/fat the meat, and add it to the gravy along with the carrots and cabbage.

Makes a real hearty stew. Same recipe can be done with 2-3 corned beef briskets (Flat Cut).
What is the easiest way to separate broth from fat?
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Old 06-19-2010, 05:34 PM   #32
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What is the easiest way to separate broth from fat?
Refrigerate. The cold fat will solidify on the top of the broth and you can just lift it off.

If you can't wait, fat always floats so you can use a large cooking or serving spoon and scoop it off the top. When you've got most of it, lay a single piece of paper towel on the surface of the liquid. It will soak up fat and you can lift it off and discard it. It will take several towels to get the job done.
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Old 06-19-2010, 09:10 PM   #33
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For the indoor method...
I was going to do it this way...with the oven at 225f, put the rubbed shoulder in a roaster with a rack for 7 hours, then wrap it in aluminum foil for the next 3 hours or until it falls apart.

I noticed that most say uncovered first and than covered. Yours was the first time I saw covered first and than uncovered.
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Old 06-20-2010, 09:22 AM   #34
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In regards to the stew...

Andy listed the two methods that work and require no special tools.
For a faster method that is often less messy, you can purchase a gravy separator for about $5-$15. These are almost essential for anyone who makes sauces from pan juices/drippings on a regular basis. I think you can gather it's function through the image below. Just make sure you have a $1 bottle brush to clean the neck if you decide to pick one up. I have a plastic OXO one, but wish I had a glass one.



As for the pulled pork...

Some people start on a charcoal grill to get some extra flavor from the charcoal and browning (grilling a shoulder that is falling apart from braising isn't very easy). I've done this extra pre-grill step before, and it might be worth it if you plan to serve the pulled pork without the reduced-stock sauce I posted previously. I find that if you serve the pulled pork pre-tossed, it's very difficult (or even impossible) to tell the difference. Note that this process doesn't "seal-in" juices whatsoever.

Then the oven (or Crock). A moist environment facilitates the breakdown of connecting tissues (yielding a tender/fall-apart shoulder). "Meat" stays juicy in pork until 140F-145F, upon which the fibers seize up (the meat releases it's juices and dries out). Unfortunately, connective tissues (such as collagen) only begin to break down into finger-licking gelatin at 160F - obviously this is well above 140F. So pulled pork (and any BBQ or braised dish for that matter) is "over-cooked" meat coated in either sauce or gelatin (or both in my recipe). So after four hours in a covered pot "simmering", you will get a big lump of semi-tender meat in a pool of fat and juices. You may wish to pour most of these off into a vessel depending on your pot shape heading into the next step.

The bark. Unfortunately we will not even approach the flavorful coating on the surface of a properly hot-smoked piece of meat with the alternative methods listed here. This layer is developed over a long period of time in a smoky environment with cooker conditions that alternate between moist and dry as various sprays and mops are applied and allowed to evaporate. We can however partially duplicate the texture by uncovering the pot and allowing the moist surface fluids on the shoulder to evaporate, brown, and get crusty (hence my uncovered pot at the end). Note that methods in reverse don't end with this "oven bark", unless you choose to slow-roast over 12 hours or so in the oven on an open pan (just make sure to regularly moisten the exterior of the meat). This method takes almost twice as long to do, but it also produces a great pulled pork (I actually used to do my pulled pork this way).

The method I posted previously yields almost identical results in half the time, and preserves more of the juices for the sauce.
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Old 06-20-2010, 09:52 AM   #35
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I'll send my address too...
HEY HEY back off buddy, it's me and the pig got me just me and the pig... Find a cake you can try to confiscate....
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Old 06-20-2010, 05:47 PM   #36
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Mimiz - Haha!
-----
After all this pulled pork talk and a shoulder sale at our local grocer I decided to pick up a Boston Butt for sandwiches this week!

I'll do some pictures tomorrow when I cook it up!
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Old 06-20-2010, 06:45 PM   #37
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Ok I'm trying to organize a fathers day dinner. I think I want to make pulled pork sandwiches.
A HUGE success!! Thanks to ALL for helping me!!!!! I realllly appreciate it. Everyone was so impressed. I had pulled pork sandwiches, corn on the cob, homemade baked beans, and homemade cole slaw. everything was DYNOMITE!!!

I bought a pork butt for the pork sandwiches and cooked it on 225 from 11pm until 12:30ish today. Than I upped it to 275. It was a 8lb and I had to give up and take it out around 170/175 degrees. It still shredded fine enough. Took some of the juices from the pan, added some broth from the pork stew I made yesterday (with the brined pork shoulder) and reduced it - added bbq sauce and mixed all the pork in with that.
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Old 06-20-2010, 06:47 PM   #38
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Nicholas Mosher View Post
It sounds like you have a smoked/brined picnic - which makes some of the best boiled dinner you've ever had!

Toss in 12-quart pot with just enough water to cover and simmer for two and a half hours covered (start counting once you see it begin to "boil"). Add lots of peeled carrots cut into large chunks and continue to simmer for another hour. Add a quartered head of cabbage along with half a dozen peeled medium yukon gold potatoes and cook an additional 30-45 minutes. By this point the meat should be fall-apart tender, the carrots should be tender through, the thickest parts of the cabbage should be soft, and the potatoes should be beginning to fall apart.

Strain everything, separate the broth from the fat, and reduce the broth by about 25%-30%. Return the potatoes, and use an immersion blender to make a nice smooth "gravy". Don't be afraid to add a tablespoon of the rendered fat either! Add a few heaping tablespoons of ground horseradish and brown mustard (more to taste). Season with salt and freshly ground white pepper. Debone/fat the meat, and add it to the gravy along with the carrots and cabbage.

Makes a real hearty stew. Same recipe can be done with 2-3 corned beef briskets (Flat Cut).
I bought a new boston butt for my pulled pork sandwiches and I followed this recipe for the so called picnic shoulder. WOW unbelievable!!!!!! My mother in law just had one spoonful and wants the recipe. One big containor for refrigerator and one big containor for freezer. Haven't eating yet, but tasted it. The sauce is sooooo rich!!!!
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Old 06-21-2010, 11:28 AM   #39
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Glad everything turned out okay!
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Old 06-21-2010, 04:54 PM   #40
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Some images of my process...








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