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Old 06-16-2010, 08:31 PM   #1
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Pulled pork sandwiches

Ok I'm trying to organize a fathers day dinner. I think I want to make pulled pork sandwiches. I have a couple questions or need the following cleared up.

I want to make sure it's known that this is a pork shoulder from a local farm. It's 4.5 lbs bone in and smoked. Everything is done at a local blood farm and I guess they choose to have it smoked.

1. Can I make this the day before and reheat for the party? Would there be any disadvantages to doing this? I know sometimes things can overcook a little when reheating.

2. I wanted to try to follow the recipe in this link. However, I don't think it was written for a smoked one? Should I cut the time in 1/2?
http://www.fieldtoforkfarm.com/recip...ecommendations

3. When it's time to make the sandwiches, should I mix the pulled pork with something? I'm guessing there not just going to want to have plain pulled pork sandwiches.

I hope these are not silly questions. I always get a little nervous before dinner party's. I'll also be poking around looking around for some tips on making a lot of corn bread. I usually only make one small loaf pan full and I switch between Jiffy brand and a recipe I have or had at one time.

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Old 06-17-2010, 04:11 AM   #2
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Originally Posted by legend_018 View Post
Ok I'm trying to organize a fathers day dinner. I think I want to make pulled pork sandwiches. I have a couple questions or need the following cleared up.

I want to make sure it's known that this is a pork shoulder from a local farm. It's 4.5 lbs bone in and smoked. Everything is done at a local blood farm and I guess they choose to have it smoked.

1. Can I make this the day before and reheat for the party? Would there be any disadvantages to doing this? I know sometimes things can overcook a little when reheating.

2. I wanted to try to follow the recipe in this link. However, I don't think it was written for a smoked one? Should I cut the time in 1/2?
Field to Fork Farm - Recipes and Books

3. When it's time to make the sandwiches, should I mix the pulled pork with something? I'm guessing there not just going to want to have plain pulled pork sandwiches.

I hope these are not silly questions. I always get a little nervous before dinner party's. I'll also be poking around looking around for some tips on making a lot of corn bread. I usually only make one small loaf pan full and I switch between Jiffy brand and a recipe I have or had at one time.
Are you planning on serving the pulled pork on corn bread? They should be served on a strudy round roll.
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Old 06-17-2010, 06:39 AM   #3
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Is the shoulder cooked and smoked or just smoked? Is it ready to be pulled?

I'm smoke'n 2 boston butts this weekend, also. I buy them raw and smoke myself, though, but I hope this helps. I like to smoke the day before, smoke to an internal temp of about 200 or when the bone will pull out clean. Let it cool a bit and rest, then pull in just a bit bigger chunks than you'd probably want on a "sammich", I put this all in a large alum foil pan, then cover w/foil and into the ice box.

Next day, about 3 hrs before the party I uncover the pan and it goes back on the smoker at 225*. I also have a mix of apple cider vinegar and apple juice(50-50) and more rub to put on the pulled pork. add alittle of each and test every 30-45min until it tastes right. By adding, mix'n and taste'n it breaks up the meat how you want it. The rub and "mop" are to just add to but not over power the pork.

You'll also want to make some cole slaw, it goes great on top of a hot pulled pork sammich!

Good luck! Maybe these pix will help.







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Old 06-17-2010, 07:06 AM   #4
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When I first asked the farmer if he had any pork shoulders, he said:
I do have shoulders available, roasts are 4-5 lbs brined, smoked and flash frozen

ya probably on buns. I don't have any smokers. I have a gas grill and an oven inside. I wrote an email to try to find out if it's already cooked. I thought someone told me that it probably means it's been cooked. I know the lady at the farm stand said she usually boils hers.
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Old 06-17-2010, 08:04 AM   #5
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I guess I'd use the grill on low that way the house doesn't get hot. I bet it is cooked, but won't hurt to ask.

Another thing is to not over complicate it. Simple is always good. My way may just cause problems, too.

If it has been cooked once, I don't think I'd want to cook it a day before, then reheat again the day of. All ya really have to do is reheat so it won't take long.

BTW, I've found that it is MUCH easier to pull warm than cold.
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Old 06-17-2010, 08:14 AM   #6
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Normally I use a fresh Pork Butt, which is the top portion of the shoulder. The Picnic is the lower portion which tends to have more fat, and is often found brined/smoked (but still needs to be cooked). Picnics that have been smoked are often brined and have the characteristic flavors of Corned Beef. Try to find a fresh Pork Butt if you can.

The traditional way to make pulled pork is how BigAL described - low and slow in a wood/charcoal smoker until all the collagen has melted and you can easily pull the meat apart.

That said, the indoor oven method has it's advantage too - namely speed, and preservation of all those drippings that can be incorporated into the best tasting BBQ sauce you have ever had. Personally I prefer a good smoker-cooked pulled pork sandwich, but sometimes I absolutely crave the finger-licking BBQ sauce from indoor pulled pork.

For the indoor method...

Trim the Boston Butt of as much exterior fat as you can. Lightly salt the shoulder and place in an 8-quart pot with 1/2-C of water and a tightly fitting lid. Pop in a pre-heated 325F oven for four hours. After the four hours, take the lid off and continue cooking 2-3 hours, or until the shoulder blade can be easily removed (make sure the interior meat is fall apart tender before shutting the oven off). Move the shoulder to a bowl to cool, and separate the accumulated liquid in the pot with a gravy separator. Save the fat for another use, and place the stock in a saucier. Reduce the stock until it reaches a near-syrupy consistency. Add a bottle of your favorite smokey BBQ sauce (or homemade), and turn off the heat. Separate the meat once it cools down a bit, and pull it into shreds (I do this by hand). Toss it with your sauce - taste as you go to determine how much you like. Cooking it the day before and letting it sit in the sauce overnight makes it even better!

I like mine served on soft Kaiser-style rolls with shredded cabbage/carrot dressed in a light cider-vinegar and mustard based vinaigrette.

EDIT: I like to use Bulls Eye BBQ sauce because it's less sweet and has a more pronounced smoky flavor. That said, almost everyone else I know likes Sweet Baby Rays. I usually end up using Sweet Baby Rays and then supplementing my sandwich with a bit of Bulls Eye. I also tend to wuss out and eat mine open faced, because I like to make huge sandwiches that never stay together more than two bites...

Cheap, feeds lots of people, and can be made on a Sunday to supply lunch boxes all week!
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Old 06-17-2010, 08:20 AM   #7
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Originally Posted by legend 18
I do have shoulders available, roasts are 4-5 lbs brined, smoked and flash frozen
Mary, I think the first thing to know.. is your meat cooked or not?...."Brined, smoked, and frozen seems to indicate that it is. This is somewhat confusing to me, as most pork shoulders/butts/etc are sold raw/uncooked. If it is indeed cooked it would seem that a slow warming process in the oven before service would be called for...If it is raw/uncooked then dry roasting in your oven would be a good method.... Season the meat and slowly roast at 250* until you have an internal temperature of 195* +....Allow it to rest for 20-30 minutes and pull/shred for your sandwiches....This can be done a day in advance. Serve the sandwiches, on a good quality bun. Have a couple of different sauce(s) on the side. Cold slaw is always a good choice...Some guest may want it on the sandwich, others just as a side dish.
Potato salad, and baked beans also are great side dishes.

Quote:
Originally Posted by legend 18
I know the lady at the farm stand said she usually boils hers


You do not want to do this!! Use your oven to roast it...or you could start it on your grill with a little smoke, and finish in the oven. HTH

Enjoy!
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Old 06-17-2010, 09:10 AM   #8
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Originally Posted by Uncle Bob View Post
Mary, I think the first thing to know.. is your meat cooked or not?...."Brined, smoked, and frozen seems to indicate that it is. This is somewhat confusing to me, as most pork shoulders/butts/etc are sold raw/uncooked. If it is indeed cooked it would seem that a slow warming process in the oven before service would be called for...If it is raw/uncooked then dry roasting in your oven would be a good method.... Season the meat and slowly roast at 250* until you have an internal temperature of 195* +....Allow it to rest for 20-30 minutes and pull/shred for your sandwiches....This can be done a day in advance. Serve the sandwiches, on a good quality bun. Have a couple of different sauce(s) on the side. Cold slaw is always a good choice...Some guest may want it on the sandwich, others just as a side dish.
Potato salad, and baked beans also are great side dishes.



You do not want to do this!! Use your oven to roast it...or you could start it on your grill with a little smoke, and finish in the oven. HTH

Enjoy!

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Old 06-17-2010, 10:25 AM   #9
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I am wondering if it has been cured (sugar or salt, like a country ham) If so then "smoked" is a whole different process than what is done with a fresh shoulder to make pulled pork. If it has been cured, it will likely not turn out like pulled pork no matter what you do. I have tried making pulled pork from a cured and smoked shoulder and, while good, it wasn't what I was looking for. I hope you will have good luck and a good time!!
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Old 06-17-2010, 11:21 AM   #10
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Mary, I think the first thing to know.. is your meat cooked or not?...."Brined, smoked, and frozen seems to indicate that it is.
Bob and all:

I finally found out more information about what I bought. The reply back to me was:

NO smoked is not precooked. Brining and smoking are a curing process to allow extended storage times often without refrigeration and add taste and flavor. I store in fridge to be on the safe side anyway. You probably have a meat thermometer that has a pork cook temp that is the best way to cook thoroughly. I believe it is 160 degree's F
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