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Old 11-02-2016, 12:45 PM   #1
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Slow-Roasted Bone-In Pork Loin - CI vs Serious Eats

I've been looking for the best way to cook a bone-in pork rib roast, and found two very similar recipes from Cook's Illustrated ("Slow-Roasted Bone-In Pork Rib Roast" https://www.cooksillustrated.com/rec...code=MCSCD00L0) and Serious Eats (Pork Loin Roast With Winter Vegetables Recipe | Serious Eats) ... both call for a 4-5 lb bone-in roast, 250 oven temperature. But the Cook's Illustrated version says this will take 3-4 hours (cooked to 145) and Serious Eats says about 2 hours (cooked to 140). I can't imagine the 5 would make a 2 hour difference in the estimated cook time...?

Since this would have a significant impact on timing of dinner... which would you assume to be more correct?

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Old 11-02-2016, 01:17 PM   #2
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Faced with this dilemma, I'd check the internal temperature after 2 hours then keep checking it periodically until it reached 140F. Then I'd pull it out and let it rest.
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Old 11-02-2016, 02:04 PM   #3
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I'm with Andy. I use my Chef Alarm probe and set it to alarm about 10 degrees before it's supposed to be done so I can double check it with my Thermapen in a couple of places to verify what I got with the probe. A good quality thermometer is essential for foods like that, because as you have discovered, going by time just doesn't work. For me, 1 to 2 hours at 300 is about typical for a bone in pork shoulder roast, but the time is always approximate.
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Old 11-02-2016, 02:29 PM   #4
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Quote:
Originally Posted by RPCookin View Post
I'm with Andy. I use my Chef Alarm probe and set it to alarm about 10 degrees before it's supposed to be done so I can double check it with my Thermapen in a couple of places to verify what I got with the probe. A good quality thermometer is essential for foods like that, because as you have discovered, going by time just doesn't work. For me, 1 to 2 hours at 300 is about typical for a bone in pork shoulder roast, but the time is always approximate.
One and a half to two hours for a shoulder roast? Interesting. crankin is asking about a pork loin roast, which should be done faster than a shoulder, since there's much less fat and collagen that has to render.

I can't explain the wide difference between the two recipes, but I have cooked a three-pound boneless pork loin roast and it's done in about an hour. I think two hours for the larger bone-in roast is reasonable, and I agree that an instant-read or probe thermometer is essential. My oven has a feature where I can set the desired end temp and place a probe in the meat, so it will sound an alarm when it reaches that temp.
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Old 11-02-2016, 05:48 PM   #5
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I'd give it 15 minutes on high (450-500) then lower the heat and roast it to 145 on the probe.
If you do a reverse sear, start low and only take it to 140 before cranking the heat. Or you could do it sous vide and finish on high.
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Old 11-02-2016, 06:12 PM   #6
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One and a half to two hours for a shoulder roast? Interesting. crankin is asking about a pork loin roast, which should be done faster than a shoulder, since there's much less fat and collagen that has to render.

I can't explain the wide difference between the two recipes, but I have cooked a three-pound boneless pork loin roast and it's done in about an hour. I think two hours for the larger bone-in roast is reasonable, and I agree that an instant-read or probe thermometer is essential. My oven has a feature where I can set the desired end temp and place a probe in the meat, so it will sound an alarm when it reaches that temp.
It depends on what I'm after. If I want a roast that I can slice, then it's hotter and a shorter time. If I want one to shred, then it's low and slow. I don't do loin roasts very often because they they are too much like chicken breast... hard to get done properly without drying out.

Whatever cut it is, I only cook bone in pork roasts. I'm not a fan of the current popularity of boneless meats. Bone in adds flavor and seems to have more fat for moistness. I only buy split chicken breasts too, never boneless, skinless.
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