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Old 10-10-2005, 10:31 AM   #1
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Smithfield Ham

My husband, who does most of our grocery shopping, said he saw Smithfield Hams at the store yesterday, and he'd thought about buying one. (They are quite expensive.)
I know they are made from pigs who are fed peanuts.
My question is this...are they the country hams that have to be soaked and boiled? Or can you just bake them?

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Old 10-10-2005, 10:35 AM   #2
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Since I had not heard of these, ( I live in Canada ) I did a search. Here is the company site, very informative on all aspects, from choosing one to preparing it.

Good luck!
http://www.smithfieldhams.com/cookinginstructions/
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Old 10-10-2005, 10:51 AM   #3
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Thank you, Jocelyn...I emailed the page to my husband to prove my point. I told him they were dry-cured hams, and he didn't believe me.
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Old 10-10-2005, 11:24 AM   #4
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Smithfield is the name of the meat market in London - and there are many fine restaurants around that vicinity too.
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Old 10-10-2005, 02:04 PM   #5
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they need to be washed, soaked, possible boiled or simmered, glazed, "roasted", sliced very thinly because it is strong, and oh so good. but it is not your ordinary supermarket water added product.

taditionally they are eaten in thin slices on biscuits, can be used in salads, soups, and other garnishes. It is not the kind of ham you take a huge slice from and sit down to eat with a side of mac and cheese. Altho thin chips of it might zip up a mac and cheese or cheese potato caserole.
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Old 10-10-2005, 04:55 PM   #6
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these hams are brilliant, and the pride of Virginia. Eating thin slices on biscuits is the best way, but I like your ideas, Robo.
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