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Old 03-24-2011, 12:35 AM   #11
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Oh--Rocklobster, my friend Jo's Granny's never used that much of the pig for her porchetta...I use about a 3-5 lb shoulder roast (boneless, that I can open like a book, pound flat, and roll) and I use Granny's recipe...but I don't know how many of those she'd do for a reunion, wedding, etc. I know that a 4 lb porchetta roast serves 2 (because we can't stop eating it...it is AMAZING if you've never had porchetta, try it...it is a flavor sensation you will not forget).
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Old 03-24-2011, 12:37 AM   #12
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This is outside a road side local cafe in Croatia, whole lambs and on occasion young goat are also cooked this way.
I cooked a suckling pig on the rottis of my bompani range for chrimbo
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Old 03-24-2011, 12:43 AM   #13
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my buddy ozzy and i used to roast a whole pig for his birthday every year. we kept up the tradition for almost 20 years until his passing.

one of his friends welded a 6 foot long steel grill "table" with heavy duty adjustable forks (made from a weight lifting bench) on the ends and a motorized, bicycle chain driven spit. definitely the way to go if you have the equipment and 16 + hours. the hard part is finding a low rpm motor with enough torque to turn a big pig and the weight of the spitrod.

oh, the pig was wired to the spitrod using steel picture hanging wire.

if you're gonna do it on a grate, you'll absolutely need a cover and i recommend having the beast's backbone sawed out and the head cut off, splitting the carcass in two. the cover is necessary to control the ambient temp much like an oven. i don't recommend trying to flip it.

rub the skin liberally in salt, then place skin sides up on the grate over coals at about 225 to 250 degrees for the duration.

and don't toss the head! rub it in salt and cook it alongside the body halves. lots of good meat around the snout and jaws and the nooks and crannies of the skull.
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Old 03-24-2011, 01:13 AM   #14
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Tom mate I love the idea of Ozzys friends ingenuity, I have a weider bench press stand that I cant use because of my right hand(it hurting like hell thats why I am awake), I have a 1976 4.5 hp Briggs and Stratton Merry Tiller with a slow belt driven pulley, what do you think oh master
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Old 03-24-2011, 05:32 AM   #15
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it is AMAZING if you've never had porchetta, try it...it is a flavor sensation you will not forget).
I agree. Nothing like it on a crusty panini bun. The street vendors in Italy have a whole pig out on a large cutting board and slice it thinly for you as per order. Nohting goes better with a cold can of beer.
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Old 03-24-2011, 11:46 PM   #16
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Coolness!

Ok, so the pictures posted appeared to use an aluminum square tubing, which seems to be about 2-2.5 inches wide. This would work if I could figure out a way to have some kind of spike on there to keep Porky from sliding.

The commercial motors for rotisseries seem expensive! I wonder if I could rig something else?

I noticed that all rotisseries have the pig tied up, legs together. Would it make a big difference if I had Porky on a crucifix-like device for his legs and arms so that he was splayed out? If I rotate him, do I need to have his tied up?

I'm in farm country to finding wire to tie him up won't be a problem.
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Old 03-25-2011, 12:21 AM   #17
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ted, I wouldn't splay the beast out if possible. you want it to be as uniform in thickness as possible in order for it to cook evenly.

you can drill some holes through the tubing if that's what you're gonna use and feed the wire through them to keep it from slipping. or you can drill through a couple of 12 inch carriage bolts for stability bars to work with the wire.

bolas, the weider bench sounds great! i'm not sure if i'd sacrifice a tiller motor though. unless you can rig a long belt from it to the spit pulley.

btw, what did you do to your hand? was it what your mom warned you about???
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Old 03-25-2011, 01:02 AM   #18
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btw, what did you do to your hand? was it what your mom warned you about???
Can't be! or else he'd be having issues with his eyesight ...
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Old 03-25-2011, 01:59 AM   #19
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ted, I wouldn't splay the beast out if possible. you want it to be as uniform in thickness as possible in order for it to cook evenly.

you can drill some holes through the tubing if that's what you're gonna use and feed the wire through them to keep it from slipping. or you can drill through a couple of 12 inch carriage bolts for stability bars to work with the wire.

bolas, the weider bench sounds great! i'm not sure if i'd sacrifice a tiller motor though. unless you can rig a long belt from it to the spit pulley.

btw, what did you do to your hand? was it what your mom warned you about???
Tom mate good advice re fixing the pig, I know you seem like me to enjoy tinkering with mechanical things. The Tiller is meant to run all types of attachments via its pulleys, the pulley guard is simple to take off, the B&S engine is a side valve deisel so it has very slow revs.
The right hand sorry to disappoint but it was breaks caused by fighting that have become arthritic
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Old 03-25-2011, 02:04 AM   #20
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Can't be! or else he'd be having issues with his eyesight ...
Thank you Ze as you know Wales is sheep country so the only draw back is sweaty feet caused by the wellington boots.
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