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Old 03-25-2011, 04:37 AM   #21
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oh man, bolas, seems we're brothers from another mother. my nose folds away well after being mashed more than once. i wasn't as good at the sweet science as you, though, as my hands are quite fine, lol.

and i've heard about you wales boys.

the sheep marked with a big red x on their wool are the ones that kick...

lol j/k.

i can't believe my wife went into the shed las year and threw away my old 3hp honda lawn mower engine. i pulled it out of the mower when it died. it had great plans for my boy's first go kart.
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Old 03-25-2011, 06:11 AM   #22
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I've pit roasted several whole hogs and never used a rotisserie. We dug a pit, burned lots of wood and topped it off with a bag of charcoal spread thin, layered on half a dozen banana leaves or damp feed sacks, laid on the pig, more damp feed sacks then buried it under about 4" of soil from the original pit. After 8 hours the pig is uncovered and you have the most tender and moist pork you've ever seen! And it doesn't get dry and tough like a rotisserie pig does.
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Old 03-25-2011, 01:03 PM   #23
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Selkie View Post
I've pit roasted several whole hogs and never used a rotisserie. We dug a pit, burned lots of wood and topped it off with a bag of charcoal spread thin, layered on half a dozen banana leaves or damp feed sacks, laid on the pig, more damp feed sacks then buried it under about 4" of soil from the original pit. After 8 hours the pig is uncovered and you have the most tender and moist pork you've ever seen! And it doesn't get dry and tough like a rotisserie pig does.
Selkie, I just returned from Hawaii, and there's nothing better in the world than the ancient Kaluha Pig you just described. They should know what they're doing by this time. Lots of work, but soooo perfectly delectable and simple.
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Old 03-25-2011, 01:26 PM   #24
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Quote:
Originally Posted by buckytom View Post
oh man, bolas, seems we're brothers from another mother. my nose folds away well after being mashed more than once. i wasn't as good at the sweet science as you, though, as my hands are quite fine, lol.

and i've heard about you wales boys.

the sheep marked with a big red x on their wool are the ones that kick...

lol j/k.

i can't believe my wife went into the shed las year and threw away my old 3hp honda lawn mower engine. i pulled it out of the mower when it died. it had great plans for my boy's first go kart.
Tom mate my nose cost my Dad a few quid twice, I hated having my hands taped before putting on the gloves, I just had this freaky feeling so at times I would glove up without the tape and as my best shot was an uppercut (I was more a mauler than a scientist, I liked being in close and sticking my thumb in the eye of anyone who jabbed and danced)I suffer for my stupidity, pity about the honda, my Dad got us a Tro-kart kit from the US about 50 yrs ago it had twin mounted 98cc McCulloch engines he watched and smiled as we built it, his friend from the US base in Warrington arranged the transport to the UK. How old is your boy? he will grow up good with you
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Old 03-29-2011, 02:30 AM   #25
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I love videos of Hawaiian style of roasting a pig, but I always get envious. I'm in Wisconsin and we don't have banana leaves or pieces of banana trees we can use. I'm wondering if I could use pieces of hickory and apple wood that has been soaked for 24 hours instead.

There's a good video online where they stuff Porky with all kinds of stuff before roasting. If I go the Hawaiian route, do I stuff or not? Also, don't I need to put rocks in the pit to increase heat mass?

I like the concept and it might be a winning method if I can work out some details.
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Old 03-29-2011, 02:37 AM   #26
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you can stuff it if you're doing the hawaiian style, but stuffing has a hard time staying in a beast on a spit.

btw, bolas, thanks. he's a great kid.

my boy is 7 years old today! he got his first spinning reel and rod today and a load of lures. can't wait for trout season to open.
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Old 03-29-2011, 09:52 AM   #27
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Watching the Hawaiian Luau video reminded me that yes, in ND they used burlap sacks that were soaked in water first. Trust me, there are no banana trees on the plains either.
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Old 04-05-2011, 12:40 AM   #28
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Now I'm wondering what I can use for a motor and gear. I really want to do this cheaply. I'll talk to some local folks about scrounging up something nice. I found a welder who will help me with the main spike that Porky gets stuck on. He's totally excited, too.
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Old 04-05-2011, 02:18 AM   #29
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probably the best way to go is to buy a commercial grade heavy duty rotisserie motor.

it'll already be low rpms (5 to 10 rpms), but just be sure it has enough torque to drive the weight of the spit rod and animal - figure upwards of 150 lbs.. it'll be an ac powered one, not battery operated.


whatever you end up using, be sure it's low rpm only. on one of our first attempts, there was a switch that threw the motor into higher revolutions. pig parts were flying everywhere... lol j/k. we didn't install it for fear of that happening.

as far as gearing goes, a couple of bicycle sprockets and a chain will work. that's what we used.
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Old 04-05-2011, 07:34 AM   #30
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I think I saw a show with A.Zimmern(sp?) Bizarre foods, where the people hooked up a bicycle up to a rotis and they took turns on the bike.

Sounds like fun, ride'n a bike to nowhere all day.
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