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Old 06-08-2013, 05:51 PM   #21
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Look up Chinese pork shoulder recipes (yummy!), you can make mexican carnitas with pork shoulder! Like many comments, long, slow cooking is key.
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Old 06-09-2013, 07:57 AM   #22
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I need to find and make friends with someone who grills with charcoal. The next time I am out I will have to follow my nose when I smell smoke and let Teddy run into their backyard. A perfect excuse to introduce myself. And get a little something for Teddy also.
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Old 06-09-2013, 08:00 AM   #23
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Pulled Pork a Success

Thank you for your imputs again.

Sorry I did not see the Liquid recipe before I started, much less am limited in materials. I put it in a crock pot the night before, and added a raspberry vinigarette dressing. Then the next day it was good and tender.

when adding the BBQ Sauce, to shake the rest of the sauce out of the bottle, I used soda instead of water. added pepper, garlic, a little cayenne pepper, Marjoram, coriander. It came out real good.

Thank you
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Old 06-09-2013, 08:15 AM   #24
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Here is an earlier post with my Cuban style method. Besides roasting in the oven and braising, I have also done this roast on the weber using an indirect method.

Pork Butt
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Old 06-09-2013, 08:03 PM   #25
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Originally Posted by Rocklobster View Post
Pulled pork is a process that takes a long time. It is fairly easy. You can do it in a pot with some flavored braising liquid. Make sure there is enough to almost cover the meat. It can be done in your oven on low, 220 to 250, for at leas 8 or more hours. You can add many different flavorings to the liquid. Garlic, onions, ketchup, cola, beer, Worcestershire sauce, or many other things depending on what you have or what you like. It is ready when it falls apart easily when pulled apart with a fork. Drain the liquid, and pull the meat apart when it is still hot. Add a bit of bbq sauce to your liking and Bob's your uncle.
And in the end the meat tastes of nothing on earth but the cooking liquid will be delicious. I often see "pulled pork" on American cookery programmes and I find it significant that the resulting meat has to be served with strongly flavoured sauces and other items.

Look up James Martin's recipe for roasted shoulder of pork with Parisienne potatoes, glazed carrots and Oxford sauce which is on the BBC website - delish!!
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Old 06-09-2013, 08:23 PM   #26
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Originally Posted by Mad Cook View Post
And in the end the meat tastes of nothing on earth but the cooking liquid will be delicious. I often see "pulled pork" on American cookery programmes and I find it significant that the resulting meat has to be served with strongly flavoured sauces and other items.

Look up James Martin's recipe for roasted shoulder of pork with Parisienne potatoes, glazed carrots and Oxford sauce which is on the BBC website - delish!!
I have to strongly disagree. A Boston Butt (top of the shoulder) is a roast that's well marbled. After slow roasting for 12 hours or so it's a most delicious and succulent meat. The unadorned meat is fantastic.

It's the tradition of barbecue that calls for the addition of sauces. Not to provide missing flavor but as an added enhancement.
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Old 06-09-2013, 08:27 PM   #27
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mad Cook View Post
And in the end the meat tastes of nothing on earth but the cooking liquid will be delicious. I often see "pulled pork" on American cookery programmes and I find it significant that the resulting meat has to be served with strongly flavoured sauces and other items.

Look up James Martin's recipe for roasted shoulder of pork with Parisienne potatoes, glazed carrots and Oxford sauce which is on the BBC website - delish!!
Done traditionally, pulled pork adds no other flavors but smoke from the fire, and maybe salt and pepper. The pork flavor is strong, and complimented by the light seasonings. I catch drippings from the bbq in a drip pan, and use it to make soup, sauce, or gravy for other meals. The sauces are served seperately in bowls, and also compliment the pork flavor.

A proper pulled pork is not braised, though after it's cooked, it can be combined with the drippings in a slow cooker to keep warm, to to take to a pot luck. In fact, the subject of pulled pork is very near to me right now, as I made it for today's pot luck after church services.

I agree that saucing the pork while it's cooking, or braising in flavored liquids can take the pork flavor right out of the meat. I've had it at restaurants, where all you could taste was the sauce.

Pulled pork done properly, produces and intense pork flavor.

Seeeeeeya; Chief Longwind of the North
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Old 06-09-2013, 09:03 PM   #28
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mad Cook View Post
And in the end the meat tastes of nothing on earth but the cooking liquid will be delicious. I often see "pulled pork" on American cookery programmes and I find it significant that the resulting meat has to be served with strongly flavoured sauces and other items.

Look up James Martin's recipe for roasted shoulder of pork with Parisienne potatoes, glazed carrots and Oxford sauce which is on the BBC website - delish!!
i read the recipe and am a little confused. is the oxford sauce only poured over the carrots, the potatoes, the pork, or all three. if it's the latter two, then your response is quite contradictory. i thought pork doesn't need a sauce or other items. why glaze the carrots, then?



Quote:
Originally Posted by Chief Longwind Of The North View Post
Done traditionally, pulled pork adds no other flavors but smoke from the fire, and maybe salt and pepper. The pork flavor is strong, and complimented by the light seasonings. I catch drippings from the bbq in a drip pan, and use it to make soup, sauce, or gravy for other meals. The sauces are served seperately in bowls, and also compliment the pork flavor.

A proper pulled pork is not braised, though after it's cooked, it can be combined with the drippings in a slow cooker to keep warm, to to take to a pot luck. In fact, the subject of pulled pork is very near to me right now, as I made it for today's pot luck after church services.

I agree that saucing the pork while it's cooking, or braising in flavored liquids can take the pork flavor right out of the meat. I've had it at restaurants, where all you could taste was the sauce.

Pulled pork done properly, produces and intense pork flavor.

Seeeeeeya; Chief Longwind of the North
i guess i should tell the hundreds of people (yes, hundreds. i've served it several years at various company, family, and sporting league parties) that they were wrong and the recipe they asked for after eating it really sucked.
that my recipe didn't taste of good pulled pork in a spicy vinegar. just spice and vinegar.




don't worry, though chief. i won't think any less of you for getting things wrong here and there, lol.



Quote:
Originally Posted by Andy M. View Post
I have to strongly disagree. A Boston Butt (top of the shoulder) is a roast that's well marbled. After slow roasting for 12 hours or so it's a most delicious and succulent meat. The unadorned meat is fantastic.

It's the tradition of barbecue that calls for the addition of sauces. Not to provide missing flavor but as an added enhancement.
agreed, that's why i put adding the bbq sauce as an option.
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Old 06-10-2013, 08:01 AM   #29
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BT, it's not that suaceing pulled pork will ruin the recipe. I was only stating that I have had it sauced so strongly, that you could no longer taste the pork flavor. And I'm aware that many, many people add sauce to their pulled pork. I just prefer not to, as I want to give the people at my table a choice as to which sauce they use. I always make three different sauces when I make the meal.

So don't go out and tell everyone that you've made it for that you did it wrong. You just did it differently.

Done correctly, sauceing the pulled pork before serving will enhance the meat. It just allows for less creativity on the eater's part.

So no, I was not wrong, just different. As I am so fond of saying, there is rarely only one war to produce a particular recipe.

Seeeeeeya; Chief Longwind of the North
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Old 06-10-2013, 08:37 AM   #30
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just to pick some nits, chief, while i agree about letting folks choose to sauce or not, you did say braising in flavored liquids can take the pork flavor right out of the meat. i think my spicy vinegar braising liquid enhances it. that's all.

but like you said, there's more than one way.
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