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Old 06-11-2012, 09:19 AM   #1
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What's the best way to cook pork chops for around 80?

I tried lightly browning and putting in a large roaster but they were a little soggy and the ones on the bottom fell apart when I tried to serve them. Also what would be good for seasoning them? Thanks!

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Old 06-11-2012, 12:16 PM   #2
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Buonasera,

I had placed a recipe in the Pork & Veal Section back in March, in which the Butcher makes a Slit for a pocket, in each thick chop ( one can use pork or veal), and thus, I prepare a stuffing to be placed in each chop and then, bake in oven ...

The Italian Paternal side of my family, stuffing includes:

3/4 ounces dried Porcini Mushrms
1 cup hot water
1 tsp butter unsalted
1 tblsp. Extra virgin olive oil
salt
spring onion (3 ) chopped finely
3 oz. Finely sliced Proscuitto di Parma or Ham of choice
freshly ground blk. pepper

The recipe has a lovely historic Sicilian aristocratic background too.

Ciao.
Have a Nice Monday.
Margaux Cintrano.
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Old 06-11-2012, 12:25 PM   #3
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Preheat oven to 400ºF.

Lightly brush grease on a large cookie sheet with olive or vegetable oil. Heat in oven while you are preparing chops.

Dredge chops in seasoned flour. I use salt, pepper, with Italian seasoning, onion and garlic powder.

Place chops on cookie tray with sides. The chops should sizzle when you put them on cookie tray. Place in oven and cook one side until a crust is formed. Turn chops over and cook other side. Remove from oven and place on a rack single layer if possible, cover with foil. Use more than one rack if you have them. Repeat. You should be able to do two trays at a time. If you do, then rotate them by switching shelves and turning trays around. When you turn the chops over, it will take less time to saute' that side.

When all the chops are done, pour a some chicken stock on the trays and loosen the fond. Pour into a saucepan and make gravy.

By placing the chops on a rack, it allows air to circulate and prevents sogginess from occurring. Shut the oven off when all the chops are done and allow it to cool down by cracking the door. When it is down to about 250ºF place the racks of pork chops in the oven still covered to keep warm until serving.

If you have only one rack, then try not to place one chop directly on top of another. That will cause sogginess. Lean the edge of a chop against the previous one so that the air can circulate. The outside will be crisp while the inside will be juicy and moist.
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Old 06-11-2012, 12:48 PM   #4
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Buonasera Cindy,

Soggy ... Were they de-thawed from freezer creating the wetness ?
Another, might be the grease factor, for example too much butter or too much oil used ?

I have a recipe that is quite lovely, Sicilian Pork Chops, which is posted on a separate thread ... It has slits, and is stuffed with mushrooms and ham. I have made this recipe with veal in Italia ...

First, the solving of the soggy or wetness ... and then, the new recipe is a good way to go.

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Old 06-11-2012, 12:52 PM   #5
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If you have the oven space I would consider stuffed pork chops.

Brown the chops and place in sheet pans with a rim, place a half cup of your favorite bread stuffing on each and bake in a 350 oven for 45 minutes or so. An ice cream scoop works great to portion the dressing

Another would be oven bar-b-q.

Brown and arrange on pans, top with sliced onions and your favorite barbeque sauce then bake uncovered for 45 minute in a 350 oven.

If you are using 'kid' sized thin chops you might want to cut back on the time a little.
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Old 06-11-2012, 02:25 PM   #6
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80 people? I would add some garlic granules and pepper to some Dixie Fry, coat the chops, lay them flat on Pam sprayed foiled baking sheets, dab them with some butter, bake at 350-375 according to the size of the chops. I do this several times a year using the huge chops from Costco and feed about 20-25 family members.
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Old 06-11-2012, 04:47 PM   #7
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Another thought that would be easier on the cook is to do a couple of boneless pork loin roasts. I would think 25 to 30 pounds would feed 80 people. If you make too much feed them pork sandwiches or a stir fry the next day.

I hope you are keeping good notes on what works and what does not, you could help many many camp cooks in years to come.
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Old 06-11-2012, 05:01 PM   #8
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Another thought that would be easier on the cook is to do a couple of boneless pork loin roasts. I would think 25 to 30 pounds would feed 80 people. If you make too much feed them pork sandwiches or a stir fry the next day.
+1

Cindy, how often have you cooked for 80 people? And what is your experience serving large groups of any size? Also, what kind of assistance (helpers) will you have available?

I'm not experienced in cooking for groups at all but I think all these are important questions to be asked, and addressed.
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Old 06-11-2012, 05:14 PM   #9
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Aunt Bea
Another thought that would be easier on the cook is to do a couple of boneless pork loin roasts. I would think 25 to 30 pounds would feed 80 people. If you make too much feed them pork sandwiches or a stir fry the next day.

I hope you are keeping good notes on what works and what does not, you could help many many camp cooks in years to come.
+2
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Old 06-11-2012, 06:36 PM   #10
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Originally Posted by Greg Who Cooks View Post
+1

Cindy, how often have you cooked for 80 people? And what is your experience serving large groups of any size? Also, what kind of assistance (helpers) will you have available?

I'm not experienced in cooking for groups at all but I think all these are important questions to be asked, and addressed.
I was thinking the same thoughts. I once had a job working in the kitchen that fed about 100 folks in a nursing home. Getting all the food cooked and finished at the same time, then to the patients while it was still hot was the challenge each day, three times a day. For kids, like the elderly, you have to keep it simple. They are not going to want to eat anything exotic that they are not familiar with. You have to use the KISS thought process. They want to see what the food is on their plate and be able to identify it.

BTW Cindy. One of the breakfasts that is fast and easy is Baked French Toast. Beat up one egg per persn, place a layer of bread in a greased baking pan, then pour some of the the beaten eggs over it. A layer of bread, some eggs. Let the eggs stand to give it time to be absorbed by the bread. Then bake in the oven. Two layers should be enough. Two pieces for each kid. The bottom piece gets browned by the pan, the top piece by the circulating heat of the oven. Place jam, syrup, butter on the table.

Of course you are going to hear, "This isn't the way my mother makes it."
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Old 06-11-2012, 06:48 PM   #11
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Brining is your friend! I like a beer brine. 1-1/2" thick, bone in chops, 10 hour brine and grill. They will be moist and very flavorful.
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Old 06-11-2012, 07:24 PM   #12
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Brining is your friend! I like a beer brine. 1-1/2" thick, bone in chops, 10 hour brine and grill. They will be moist and very flavorful.
Craig, luv ya dearly. But I don't think there is going to be much beer in a daycamp for kids. At least I hope not. And I doubt that they are willing to put out the money for 1.5" chops for kids. Great suggestion, just not for this situation.

I can just hear the kids telling their parents that they had beer at camp.
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Old 06-11-2012, 07:28 PM   #13
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Originally Posted by Addie

Craig, luv ya dearly. But I don't think there is going to be much beer in a daycamp for kids. At least I hope not. And I doubt that they are willing to put out the money for 1.5" chops for kids. Great suggestion, just not for this situation.

I can just hear the kids telling their parents that they had beer at camp.
Is OP doing the daycamp kid thing? I didn't pick that up.
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Old 06-11-2012, 07:34 PM   #14
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Is OP doing the daycamp kid thing? I didn't pick that up.
Yes she is. She is the one who had a question re: cinnamon rolls.
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Old 06-11-2012, 07:34 PM   #15
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Craig, luv ya dearly. But I don't think there is going to be much beer in a daycamp for kids. At least I hope not. And I doubt that they are willing to put out the money for 1.5" chops for kids. Great suggestion, just not for this situation.

I can just hear the kids telling their parents that they had beer at camp.
I didn't see anything in the OPs post that mentioned kids. If they had, I would have suggested a different brine. They also did not state they had a limited budget. My bad, I should not assume.
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Old 06-11-2012, 07:52 PM   #16
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I didn't see anything in the OPs post that mentioned kids. If they had, I would have suggested a different brine. They also did not state they had a limited budget. My bad, I should not assume.
She is cooking for a daycamp for kids. Remember, she is the one who asked about the cinnamon rolls. That is when she mentioned the daycamp. Sorry I chided you. But it did make me laugh.
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Old 06-11-2012, 07:53 PM   #17
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I would love to help with the questions you have. I have a few first.
You told us about your two ovens in your other thread. Could you describe all the equipment you have? I asking about cooking items, stovetops, tiltgrills, fryers.
And do you have help?
PM me any thing you want I'm sure I can help. 80 servings is up my alley and cooking simple is what the Army does. So feel free to ask away.
I'll be able to help with the chop question after I get a idea of you kitchen a little bit more.
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Old 06-11-2012, 08:01 PM   #18
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Im working as a cook at a church camp this month and they want home-made cinnamon rolls for breakfast on Saturday mornings.

Cindy

Craig, this is her original post. She is cooking for a church camp. That means daycamp. Kids show up around nine a.m., have a snack, have lunch and go home in the late p.m. in time for supper at home. And since this is a church sponsored camp, you can bet the budget is tight.
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Old 06-11-2012, 09:51 PM   #19
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Baking is yoru freind. Just make sure that the ribs are not overcooked, or they will be dry and tough, not something that the kids will want to eat. A simple seasoning of salt, a bit of pepper, and maybe a touch of sage will make the chops taste great. Bone-in make better chops than boneless, if you have the choice. The trick is cooking time.

Don't time your chops. Rather, bake them on cookie sheets, with sides, as suggested, multiple trays at a time if possible, and after thirty minutes at 350' F., check them with a meat thermometer. They should be pulled when the internal temp reaches about 150' F. Let them rest in a hotel pan covered with foil.

You night want to make or have on hand some good barbecue sauce, something with brown sugar, chili powder, and a little tomato sauce. This can be slathered over the ribs after they are removed from the oven, and before they are put into the hotel pans.

Equally good is to make a fruit based sweet and sour sauce. Pineapple, peaches, apricots, orange juice, Lime juice, they all make a wonderful sauce or glaze.

Serve with wholesome and great tasting veggies, such as hubbard squash, seasoned to taste like pumpkin pie filling, or fried cabbage with finely diced onion. Bread, or rice dressing, seasoned with sage, can hide onions, celery, grated carrots, etc., and who doesn't love a bit of good bread dressing on a pork chop. Sliced carrots, glazed with honey butter can change a kid who hates carrots into a kid who loves carrots.

Don't forget the legume group, beans, peas, lentils, etc, when seasoned and prepared properly don't take a lot of time to make, are delicious, very nutritious, and cheap. Now who doesn't like baked beans? And they are an absolute natural with the pork chops.

If you have the time, and the breadcrumbs, season the bread crumbs with salt, sage, black pepper, and chicken bullion. Dredge the pork chops in flour, then a vat of egg wash, , then the bread crumbs. Bake as directed above. Again test for temperature with a meat thermometer before serving.

Brown rice is much heathier than is white rice. But it takes longer to cook. Potatoes are just not a very healthy food, in any form. Choose other fresh veggies, or whole grains such as soba noodles, whole wheat noodles, steel cut oats, or rolled oats (for cookies and such, whole grain breads, etc.

I and a friend cooked for two weeks for 200 girs at a church girls camp. One favorite was taco salad, with home made refried beans on the side, and good salad dressing. The girls loved it. Your chops could be cut into strips and used in this fassion as well.

I hope I've given you some ideas you can use.

Seeeeeeya; Chief Lognwind of the North
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Old 06-11-2012, 10:00 PM   #20
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Chief Longwind Of The North View Post
Baking is yoru freind. Just make sure that the ribs are not overcooked, or they will be dry and tough, not something that the kids will want to eat. A simple seasoning of salt, a bit of pepper, and maybe a touch of sage will make the chops taste great. Bone-in make better chops than boneless, if you have the choice. The trick is cooking time.

Don't time your chops. Rather, bake them on cookie sheets, with sides, as suggested, multiple trays at a time if possible, and after thirty minutes at 350' F., check them with a meat thermometer. They should be pulled when the internal temp reaches about 150' F. Let them rest in a hotel pan covered with foil.

You night want to make or have on hand some good barbecue sauce, something with brown sugar, chili powder, and a little tomato sauce. This can be slathered over the ribs after they are removed from the oven, and before they are put into the hotel pans.

Equally good is to make a fruit based sweet and sour sauce. Pineapple, peaches, apricots, orange juice, Lime juice, they all make a wonderful sauce or glaze.

Serve with wholesome and great tasting veggies, such as hubbard squash, seasoned to taste like pumpkin pie filling, or fried cabbage with finely diced onion. Bread, or rice dressing, seasoned with sage, can hide onions, celery, grated carrots, etc., and who doesn't love a bit of good bread dressing on a pork chop. Sliced carrots, glazed with honey butter can change a kid who hates carrots into a kid who loves carrots.

Don't forget the legume group, beans, peas, lentils, etc, when seasoned and prepared properly don't take a lot of time to make, are delicious, very nutritious, and cheap. Now who doesn't like baked beans? And they are an absolute natural with the pork chops.

If you have the time, and the breadcrumbs, season the bread crumbs with salt, sage, black pepper, and chicken bullion. Dredge the pork chops in flour, then a vat of egg wash, , then the bread crumbs. Bake as directed above. Again test for temperature with a meat thermometer before serving.

Brown rice is much heathier than is white rice. But it takes longer to cook. Potatoes are just not a very healthy food, in any form. Choose other fresh veggies, or whole grains such as soba noodles, whole wheat noodles, steel cut oats, or rolled oats (for cookies and such, whole grain breads, etc.

I and a friend cooked for two weeks for 200 girs at a church girls camp. One favorite was taco salad, with home made refried beans on the side, and good salad dressing. The girls loved it. Your chops could be cut into strips and used in this fassion as well.

I hope I've given you some ideas you can use.

Seeeeeeya; Chief Lognwind of the North
That might work for some kids. I would have gone to bed hungry with those suggestions. Squash, pumpkin pie seasoning, glazed carrots, baked beans, bread dressing, sweet sauces, lentils. You have listed some of the things I really despise and despised as a child.
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