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Old 09-21-2005, 02:05 PM   #11
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Chris:

I'm in Chelmsford. Let us know how the ribs work out.

Andy M.
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Old 09-21-2005, 02:06 PM   #12
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Tony Romas Finger Licking Good Baby Back Ribs

Anyone can make tender, finger licking good ribs. Try this once, and you'll never go back to the old ways. It's easy! Some people like to marinate their ribs. I don't do it anymore since I find the outcome is not that much different. If you wish to do it, marinate overnight in a shallow pan. End of story.

This is my Simple Marinade. It works for everything, including chicken and flank steak:
1 cup of water
1/2 cup sake (Japanese rice wine)
1/2 cup Kikkoman's Teriyaki sauce, the kind that flows like soy sauce
1 tablespoon of liquid smoke

Next, make sure you have some nice racks of baby back pork ribs. Doesn't matter if they are fresh or have been frozen. Just make sure they are marked "baby back". Nothing else will do.
Simply put each rack of ribs in an individual foil package. Use a sheet of heavy-duty tin foil for each one, and seal the package so that no air/steam can escape. Put them in the oven at 350F for an hour. Turn the heat down to 300F and bake them for another hour. At Tony's, they use convection at 450F for an hour with the marinade, but I like using the lower heat, in natural juices.

At the end of the two hours in the oven, take the ribs out and let cool. If you are going to an event, you can pack up the ribs already wrapped in tin foil. It's totally convenient, because you can leave it in the foil packs until you are ready for the final step, which is getting the sauce on top! If you have a barbeque, that is great. If not, you can use move the oven racks to the broil position, or even a toaster oven in broil position.

Make the Secret BBQ Sauce first:
Bull's Eye BBQ Sauce, whatever flavor you like, but ONLY Bull's Eye
Corn Syrup (I use the old trusty yellow bottle of Bee Hive)
The proportion is 1/3 corn syrup and 2/3 BBQ sauce. Mix well.

Face the Fire
Next, brush a generous amount of the Secret BBQ sauce onto the top side of the ribs. If you are using a BBQ, you need to put the top side of the ribs down onto the grill. If you are using the broil function of the oven, you leave the top side up to face the heat. The bottom line is that the top side of the ribs, the top of the curved rack, must face the heat source.

The key is that you watch it cook carefully, until the sauce starts to bubble on the ribs. Let it bubble until it is nice and gooey, on the edge of being burnt. Let it come close but do not let it burn. This is call caramelization, and produces the sticky fingers feeling that is treasured by rib eaters! Brush on sauce one more time and let it bubble until it's all gooey, but again, do not let it burn.

You are done. Serve with corn on the cob. If you are going to serve it with BBQ sauce on the side for dipping, just use the sauce out of the Bull's Eye bottle. No need to add the corn syrup, since we do not need to caramelize it.
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Old 09-21-2005, 02:18 PM   #13
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What's the old way?
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Old 09-21-2005, 02:22 PM   #14
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Raine
What's the old way?
This recipe was given to me by someone that used to cook
at Tony Romas. those were her comments not mine. I assume the "old way" means any other way you used to make your ribs.
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Old 09-21-2005, 02:51 PM   #15
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Ok. our old way and only way is to cook them in the cooker.
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Old 09-21-2005, 03:01 PM   #16
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Thumbs up

In fact we cooked ribs yeterday for the first time in the new pit, and they were grrrrrreat!
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Old 09-21-2005, 03:45 PM   #17
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I use a dry rub and roast them or slow cook BBQ.

If I eat another pork rib smothered in a vinegar and sugar combination
I think I will self destruct.
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Old 09-21-2005, 08:11 PM   #18
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Hmm, marinating in coke? I like...

I say #2...crossed with #1!

First, take the ribs and the coke...put the coke in the bottom of an oven pan, then the ribs on a rack in the pan, and cover with foil. Put the oven at 235 and slow bake for 2 hours, turn them over just past halfway through. Check them regularly and stop baking if the fat has totally melted off and the meat is pulling off the bones.

Now, to crisp 'em. Take the coke out of the bottom of the pan, and take off the foil. Put the oven at around 450 and bake 'em hot for about 5-10 minutes a side, but no more. This just adds that nice carmelization on the outside.

Replace the coke with a good beer if you want, as I've never tried it with coke. Also, if you want to marinate, bake them *first* for about an hour, to open up the meat texture before tossing them back in. This will infuse the meat with a lot more of the flavor.

Doing it this way makes for ribs that have the meat pulling right off the bone with little or no effort, yet not becoming soggy or mushy. It's my favorite method :)

Let us know how they turn out, however you decide to cook 'em! :)
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Old 09-21-2005, 10:09 PM   #19
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However good ribs don't need a marinade. Also be careful with brining ribs, as that can make them taste hammy.

We like to keep is simple, cook them slow & low, with a rub letting the fat render out. Then we glaze them during the last 15-20 minutes.
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Old 09-22-2005, 05:25 AM   #20
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Chris I know this isn't a method you mentioned, but ribs come out fall-off-the-bone good when made in a slow cooker (if you have one around). This one caught my interest because the ingredients weren't the same old same old.

Asian Baby Backs

2 lbs baby back ribs
2 cloves garlic, chopped
2 inches cinnamon sticks
2 tablespoons grated orange or lemon zest
1 teaspoon anise seeds
1/2 cup sherry wine or madeira wine
2 tablespoons soy sauce
1 tablespoon balsamic vinegar
1 tomato, diced
1 teaspoon dried thyme
Salt for seasoning

Season ribs with some salt.
  1. Brown ribs together with garlic, cinnamon sticks, orange zest and anise seeds in a large Dutch oven over medium high heat.
  2. Drain off excess fat and transfer ribs into the slow cooker or crockpot.
  3. Add sherry, soy sauce, balsamic vinegar, tomato and thyme to the ribs.
  4. Cook over low heat for 8 to 10 hours or on high for 4 to 5 hours.
  5. Transfer ribs to a baking sheet lined with foil.
  6. Place under broiler for 3 to 5 minutes to char the ribs (optional).
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