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Old 03-07-2006, 12:32 PM   #1
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Ossibuchi (for risotto alla milanese)

Some days ago, I've put the recipe of risotto alla Milanese. This dish of meal is the classic approach fot it. Taste and enjoy....
INGREDIENTS: Six veal marrowbones, about 3 cms high, carrot, onion, celery, laurel, sage, rosemary, parsley, lemon, tomato cream (how do you translate "passata di pomodoro"? ), white flour, dry white wine, cube broth, evoo, salt, black pepper (anchovies under oil)
Cut the little skin that colleagues the bone with the meat, so that the meat cannot curl while cooking. Pass in flour every piece and roast them in high flame, with a little oil. Mince a little carrot, a medium onion, one celery leaf .and a laurel leaf, make tthem fade in four spoons of oil, put the roasted marrowbones, and allow them to absorb the flavors. Add a half glass of wine, and, when this will be nearly evaporated, add about 150 gr cream of tomatoes, a ladle of broth, salt, pepper. Close the pot, reduce the flame to minimum, and leave the marrowbones cook for one hour and half, eventually adding more broth. When finished, season them with "gremolada" a very thin mincing of lemon skin, rosmarin, sage, and parsley. (In my family’s version , we add some -two or three - anchovies, and I really do suggest you to do the same, but it’s a variant of the original recipe).
The classic way to serve them is with yellow risotto: in a dish, pour a little mountain of risotto, make a hole in the center, ad add the marrowbones with their sauce.

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Old 03-07-2006, 12:53 PM   #2
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Passata is a seived tomato product. That is, tomato that has had the seeds and skin removed and has a smooth texture.

Thanks for the recipe. This is one of my favorite Italian dishes.
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Old 03-07-2006, 12:55 PM   #3
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probably tomata passata....?
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Old 03-07-2006, 01:25 PM   #4
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thanks rdg. i've had a dish called osso bocco, which is similar, made with veal shanks, and often accompanied by diced carrots and young peas in the sauce. i like the difference here with the gremoulada and anchovies.

in either dish, the marrow spread on garlic crostini is just incredible. like buttah...

lol, ossi bucchi = bone mouths. i know a few bone heads, but not bone mouths.
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Old 03-07-2006, 05:23 PM   #5
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Quote:
Originally Posted by buckytom
thanks rdg. i've had a dish called osso bocco, which is similar, made with veal shanks, and often accompanied by diced carrots and young peas in the sauce. i like the difference here with the gremoulada and anchovies.

in either dish, the marrow spread on garlic crostini is just incredible. like buttah...

lol, ossi bucchi = bone mouths. i know a few bone heads, but not bone mouths.
No, no, Bucky...Osso: bone, buchi = holes. Ossibuchi: bones with holes...
Mouth is "bocca"....Mouths ="bocche"
Shanks is ok: in other translations, I've found this recipe with the name of shanks.
And I totally agree with you for marrow on crostini: better than cheviar....
I admit that is pure cholesterol at 120%, but it'so a little quantity.....
What's buttah? I'm always interested in things I don't know.....
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Old 03-08-2006, 04:07 AM   #6
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Andy and Cara...Thanks. I had the doubt on the word "passata"....
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Old 03-08-2006, 08:23 AM   #7
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lol rdg, there's a local dialect around nyc and long island that really chews on the pronunciation of their words. for instance butter is buttah, coffee is cawfee, new york is new yaw-k, and long island is lawn guyland.

i don't know if you know of a comedian named mike meyers (famous for the "austin powers" movies), but he used the accent well in skits on a tv show called saturday night live, playing an older jewish woman with a local cable tv talk show.
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Old 05-14-2006, 04:14 AM   #8
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Osso buco

We had some last night. But I forgot to get parsley for the gremolata. And this may be sacrilege, but I can't stand the taste of marrow.
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Old 05-14-2006, 09:56 AM   #9
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Quote:
Originally Posted by RDG
how do you translate "passata di pomodoro"?
Passata is pretty much like the "tomato sauce" out of a tin in the English speaking parts of the world. (You may add "from a tin" just to avoid the confusion with tomato based pasta sauce which is known by many as "marinara sauce".)
If I remember correctly it is a bit thicker than passata, but basically a sieved tomato product (as Andy described) with a touch of salt.
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Old 08-02-2006, 10:11 AM   #10
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Passata is available, just as that - "passatta" - in jars or cartons. Perhaps that's here in Scotland.
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