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Old 12-02-2009, 09:49 AM   #1
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Deep fried lamb help

Last year, my dad and I were at a golf outing and they made deep fried bone-in lamb. Now, I have deep fried a turkey many times, but was wondering if anyone could help me as to how to deep fry a leg of lamb, as in how big of lamb, how hot oil, how many mins per pound, injection recipes, etc.

It was really good but cant find anything on internet about fried leg of lamb.

Thanks

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Old 12-02-2009, 10:22 AM   #2
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I never fried a leg of lamb but I have fried a leg of pork....ham, that is.
You could fry it with the bone in but I removed the bone from the ham and tied it with string to keep it together. A 6 - 10 lb ham...3-3 1/2 minutes per pound at 375 degrees. I reckon lamb does not need to be as thoroughly cooked as pork. I am guessing 150 degrees internal temp would be ok.
I am certain that there are many folks here more familiar with lamb than I am and I humbly defer to their advice.
You could use any marinade you want. Garlic and rosemary are traditional.
You could inject the lamb as well.
NOTE!! THIS IS IMPORTANT!!!!
If you have never used a gas deep fryer, aka turkey fryer, please take the time to review ALL of the safety recommendations.
Remember you are using oil over an open flame.

From Wikipedia---
Safety

Deep-frying a turkey uses oil over an open flame, thus it presents some hazards. The operation must be considered hazardous from the time the flame is lit to the time the turkey is removed and the oil is cooled.
  • A propane burner must never be used indoors, on a wooden deck, under a roof, tree, or near any flammable materials.
  • The propane tank must be placed as far away from the cooker as possible.
  • Never leave the fryer unattended.
  • The turkey must be fully thawed or fresh and must be dry. If ice contacts boiling oil it will cause a boil-over and a flame hazard.
  • Always measure the amount of oil needed and never overfill the pot. Place the turkey in the empty pot and fill with water to just cover the turkey. Remove the turkey and use a ruler to measure the depth of the water– this is the amount of oil needed.
  • Keep children and pets away from the fryer during and after operation.
  • Ensure a fire extinguisher rated for flammable liquids is readily available.
  • Use a thermometer to monitor the temperature of the oil during operation and keep the temperature at 350 °F (175 °C). Reduce the heat immediately if the oil begins to smoke.
  • Use heavy gloves or oven mitts and wear a long-sleeve shirt. Wear closed-toe shoes, not sandals.
  • Do not consume alcohol during the process.
  • Lower and remove the turkey carefully and slowly to avoid oil splashing or spillage.
There is also a possibility that an overheated turkey fryer can explode. Also, if the oil ignites, it can be what one Underwriters Laboratories representative called "a vertical flame thrower".[1] A number of homes and other buildings (such as garages) have been destroyed due to the unsafe use of a turkey fryer and UL has refused to list turkey fryers, releasing a short and graphic explanatory video on their concerns.[2]

Let us know how it turns out!!!
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Old 12-02-2009, 04:59 PM   #3
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Yes I have had a fried leg of lamb but it's not like turkey and I am Indian so I can tell you the method that has been used to make the one I have had.

Lamb is first marinated in ground spices (cumin, corrainder, chilis, white pepper, cardamom, cinnamon etc.). Also a fair amount (3 tbsps) of grated ginger is rubbed on it.

Lamb is cooked in an oven. Cook it uncovered so that the water evaporates and the meat is roasted until it's tender and dry but not completely falling apart.

Next it's removed cooled and then here is how I have fried it in the past but only once.

The entire leg of lamb is then rolled in seasoned bread crumbs or semolina (whatever you like) and then dipped in eggs (you can break about half a dozen eggs and beat them and also season that with red chili and salt).

Then the leg is put in oil (a lot of oil is needed in a large saute pan) and place it carefully. Cook turning it on both sides carefully. Let the eggs get nice and golden brown. Carefully remove it on a large tray.

Normally it's served whole in a huge platter garnished with veggies or rice.

I think lamb is pretty tough to just fry directly.
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Old 12-02-2009, 06:44 PM   #4
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Is it possible to contact the golf club and ask who the caterer was for that event? Then you could contact them and talk to the kitchen manager about it. I'm sure if you told them how much you liked it they would help you out. Even better if the GC has their own chef and you could speak to him/her.
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Old 12-02-2009, 09:28 PM   #5
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Thanks all!

A friend of mine had a Reese Williams Fryer Cookbook and gave it to me today. Here's what it says:
Minutes per pound, all oil at 350degree
Turkey, whole 3 1/2 per pound
Turkey Breast 7 1/2 per pound
Turkey Legs 8 per pound
Chicken, whole 8 per pound
Chicken breast 10 per pound
Cornish hens 8 per pound
Duck, whole 10 per pound
Leg of lamb, boneless 7-8 per pound
Beef, prime rib 8 per pound
___________________________________________
Beef, tenderloin 7-8 per pound
medium rare 145F
medium 160F
Well 170F
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Old 12-02-2009, 09:29 PM   #6
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Quote:
Originally Posted by chefkathleen View Post
Is it possible to contact the golf club and ask who the caterer was for that event? Then you could contact them and talk to the kitchen manager about it. I'm sure if you told them how much you liked it they would help you out. Even better if the GC has their own chef and you could speak to him/her.
Great idea, Thanks!
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