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Old 06-27-2016, 03:05 PM   #31
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Steve, I don't get to eat lamb as often as I'd like. SO dislikes it. Both daughters are OK with it but SIL won't touch it. So this weekend for our 4th of July cookout, I'm making beef souvlaki rather than lamb or pork because it's the "safe" alternative.
Andy, since you're making souvlaki, why not make some lamb and some beef? They're naturally separated!
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Old 06-27-2016, 03:13 PM   #32
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Andy, since you're making souvlaki, why not make some lamb and some beef? They're naturally separated!
Hmmm, I guess I could do both...

Thanks for the suggestion.
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Old 06-27-2016, 03:25 PM   #33
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Hmmm, I guess I could do both...

Thanks for the suggestion.
You're welcome I know you've said you sometimes make salmon for yourself and another type of fish for your SO, so I thought, why not meat?
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Old 06-27-2016, 04:07 PM   #34
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I grew up on lamb shanks / chops / roasts with mint jelly. Until I was an adult, it's all I ever knew. I think it's that Irish/English family thing that my grandmother & my father brought over with them.

As an adult, I learned that lamb has a natural affinity for garlic-lemon-rosemary. I've never looked back. I like the complexity much better. I usually just do a simple pan sauce for chops; deglaze with white wine, add the garlic, lemon & rosemary.

For shanks, I've been braising with Moroccan spices. WOW!
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Old 06-27-2016, 07:07 PM   #35
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Thank you everyone for taking the time to show me what should have been a nice dinner. So Lamb's not supposed to be grey, or a skinny anorexic chop!? That's what I got.
Beautiful pictures and recipes to. Can't beat that. I've learned a lot.

This is why I come here. You guys have been great learning me something new. When I get the chance your suggestions will be kept in mind, used.

Thank you

Munky.
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Old 06-27-2016, 11:21 PM   #36
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Lamb is one of the dishes that is actually easier to do well as a home cook than in a restaurant. It should be about medium rare to just under medium. The problem with lamb is it is touchy. Leave it a bit too long, it goes into well done, and sucks. It is a very tricky meat to get the temperature right. Now if you are just serving it off the grill, it isn't that hard to do, in a restaurant environment, there are a lot of things that can go wrong between plating it and serving it. sits under the salamander for a bit too long? Suddenly the beautiful chop at the exact temperature becomes shoe leather.

Lamb is actually easy to prepare, you can do tricks with sauces and that is another discussion, but in a restaurant getting a decent lamb chop is more a testament to the establishment's organization and communication than the skill of the chef. With a little salt and pepper you can grill a perfect medium rare lamb chop on any fairly hot surface, given a modicum of practice. Now you probably couldn't do one in the middle of a 100 seat meal service, and have it be perfect when it gets to the table, but that is the advantage the home cook has over the pro chef.

I always worry when I see a lamb chop on a menu with a complicated heavy sauce. Heavy sauces cover many sins, and that tells me you aren't sure you'll get it out at the right temperature. Ketchup? Definite red flag there.

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Old 06-28-2016, 04:45 AM   #37
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Quote:
Originally Posted by erehweslefox View Post
Lamb is one of the dishes that is actually easier to do well as a home cook than in a restaurant. It should be about medium rare to just under medium. The problem with lamb is it is touchy. Leave it a bit too long, it goes into well done, and sucks. It is a very tricky meat to get the temperature right. Now if you are just serving it off the grill, it isn't that hard to do, in a restaurant environment, there are a lot of things that can go wrong between plating it and serving it. sits under the salamander for a bit too long? Suddenly the beautiful chop at the exact temperature becomes shoe leather.

Lamb is actually easy to prepare, you can do tricks with sauces and that is another discussion, but in a restaurant getting a decent lamb chop is more a testament to the establishment's organization and communication than the skill of the chef. With a little salt and pepper you can grill a perfect medium rare lamb chop on any fairly hot surface, given a modicum of practice. Now you probably couldn't do one in the middle of a 100 seat meal service, and have it be perfect when it gets to the table, but that is the advantage the home cook has over the pro chef.

I always worry when I see a lamb chop on a menu with a complicated heavy sauce. Heavy sauces cover many sins, and that tells me you aren't sure you'll get it out at the right temperature. Ketchup? Definite red flag there.

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The majority of us are home cooks and speaking for myself, have very little interest in what goes on in the "back" at a restaurant. There are very few restaurants in my area that we go to. Reviews and health code violations play heavily in the selection process. We do lamb very well at home and have never order it in a restaurant.
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Old 06-28-2016, 07:59 AM   #38
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No mint sauce here. I developed a recipe for lamb chops with a dill sauce. I tried to attach the pdf but the file is 4 MB (with pics)--that exceeds the size allowed. If anyone wants the recipe card for the chops and sides, PM me.
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Old 06-28-2016, 12:42 PM   #39
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Personally, despite being raised by a mother who wouldn't consider eating lamb without mint jelly, I never do anything much besides a bit of salt and pepper. Maybe I'm odd, but I simply like the flavor of naked lamb.

There isn't much I like more than a trio of 1" thick rib chops, lightly dusted with salt and pepper, then grilled medium rare. I don't like them frenched. As far as I'm concerned you are just cutting off perfectly good flavor doing that.

For saucing I prefer something like braised lamb shanks, served with the reduced braising liquid.
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Old 06-28-2016, 12:54 PM   #40
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I've used this recipe from Epicurious.com twice and it's outstanding.

Rack of Lamb with Garlic and Herbs recipe | Epicurious.com
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How Should Lamb Chops be Cooked? We skipped going to the Bacon Fest and went and had dinner at a place that we had never been to before. BIG MISTAKE.:ohmy: First off I think some Yelp reviewers are liars. I would only have rated the place a 1, and that's just because I'm nice.They gave the place almost 5 stars.. Seriously? That being said. I went out of my comfort zone and ordered what should have been Lamb chops. It was the Special on the dinner menu. They were chopped alright. Never having it before I'm suspecting they over cooked it. Is Ketchup supposed to accompany it? I thought mint jelly was the rule. It was tough as nails. dry as dust, flavorless. S&P was the only seasoning. Is that the way it should have been cooked? Hubby and I traded plates. He's such a gentleman. :flowers: Ummm, the fish and chips that he ordered wasn't Cod as the menu said it was supposed to be. Rubber bands was more like it. Our dogs loved it. They would.:rolleyes: 3 stars 1 reviews
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