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Old 07-06-2016, 02:54 AM   #81
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The feedback on this meal kit was "awesome, frigging amazing, whooza."My Dad loved it when I made it for him, but I think he was just really impressed that my name was one the recipe card. He loves it when I send him articles I've written. He has all of them in a binder. And has added this to the binder.
Swedish-inspired Lamb chops Ingredients: 4 lamb chops (grass-fed, bone in, ¾-1 inch) 1/3 bunch fresh dill ½ c lamb stock 5 oz spring mix greens 2 small yellow flesh potatoes 1 bunch radishes 1 lemon 1 yellow pepper 4 oz snow peas 2 green onions 6 T butter (unsalted) 1-2 tsp AP flour 2 tsp honey 1 anchovy fillet 5 capers 1 tsp apple cider vinegar 1 clove garlic 1 tsp sugar salt pepper EVOO Instructions Getting Started: Preheat oven to 400 :Line a baking sheet with parchment paper. Prepare ingredients: Radishes: wash and separate greens Radish greens: chop (2 T – if you cant get radish greens on that are delicate, use pea shoots) Lemon (1/2): juice Butter: melt Potatoes: slice almost to the bottom every 1.8” Garic: grate Roast radishes and potatoes: Garlic butter In a bowl combine 4 T butter and grated garlic. Reserve remaining 1 T butter for dill sauce. Radishes In a small bowl, combine honey, 1 T EVOO, ½ tsp sea salt, ¼ tsp pepper, 2 tsp lemon juice, and 2 tsp radish greens. Add the radishes and toss to coat. Spread radishes on the parchement-lined baking sheet. Set remaining olive oil mixture aside., Potatoes Brush a small baking dish with 1-2 T garlic butter. Place the potatoes in the dish and brush with half the remaining garlic butter. Season with S&P. Bake the radishes and potatoes for 15 minutes. Prepare ingredients – Part 2 Dill: chop (1/4 c) Green onions: slice fine Pepper (1/2): julienne Peas: halve Anchovy: chop fine Capers: rinse and chop Prepare the lamb Trim any fat In a bowl, mix 2 T fresh chopped dill, 1.2 tsp salt, and ¼ tsp pepper. Press mixture onto lamb and set aside. Make the salad Retrieve mixture from step 2 and add 1 tsp sugar (or maple syrup), 2 T EVVO and 2 tsp fresh lemon juicd Toss greens, yellow pepper, green onions and peas. Once rasishes are cooked, cut in half and add to salad. Dress just before serving. Finish the potatoes Remove potatoes from oven and brush with remaining garlic butter. Increase oven temp to 425 and return to oven for another 10 mins. Make the dill sauce In a small pan, melt 1 tsp butter over medium heat. Add the anchovy and stir until it dissolves. Add flour and lamb stock and stir to thicken. Add capers, apple cider vinegar, and remaining dill and 1 tsp lemon juice. S&P to taste. Cook the lamb chops In a medium grill pan, heat 2 T olive oil over medium heat. Add lamb chops and cook for 3-4 minutes on each side for medium rare. Remove to a plate and allow to rest for 2-3 minutes. Finish and serve Plate lamb chops, pour dill sauce over top and garnish with lemon wedge. Serve with potatoes and salad on the side. Enjoy.
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Old 07-06-2016, 11:02 AM   #82
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I'm confused - On your diagram the shoulder and front shank and rear shank cuts shows a picture of a cut with a round bone in it like Caslon posted.
The lower end of the shoulder also has a round bone, and it's pretty chewy. In the King Soopers (Kroger) meat case they were differentiated by calling the upper ones shoulder "blade" chops and the lower ones shoulder "arm" chops. The blade chops were usually pretty tender and good on the grill, but the arm chops needed a bit more love to make them edible.
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Old 07-06-2016, 11:21 AM   #83
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Braised Lamb Blade Chop (that's what the label said, not sure now LOL)



Broiled Lamb Loin Chop



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Old 07-06-2016, 06:24 PM   #84
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Lamb loin chops...right. Damn...those are expensive. Mini T-Bone lamb. I've never cooked them because I've always thought them to expensive

I was trying to harken back to decades ago, when a lamb chop was a lamb chop. It looked like it, it quacked like it.

Today, I see mainly small t-bone shaped loin and shoulder lamb chops at the supermarket. Some of those cuts look wierd.

Just gimme a simple lamb chop! ...a leg lamb chop. Oval, a bone at one end...
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Old 07-06-2016, 07:05 PM   #85
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A US company makes lamb for stew in packages. It looks just like beef cubes and has no lamb taste. I remember getting US lamb for stew from Albertston's supermarket where it took me a good 40 minutes to cut off all the fat to make 2-1/2 lbs. of lamb for lamb curry. The lamb they sell nowadays as "stew lamb meat" looks and tastes no different than "beef for stew" made from cows.

And..if I buy flavorful lamb (not gamey).. I have to buy chops and whatnot, and cut them up into cubes, which ends up costing a lot for lamb curry. US lambs aren't raised like they used to be. 1/4 grass, 3/4 hay...

Lamb raised on 2/3 grass...1/3 hay= "gamey".

US farm raised lamb is now fed mostly with hay during growth, so it's almost like beef! It's what gives lamb its unique taste. I don't like the taste of overly fed lamb...too gamey. But, I also don't like the bland taste of US raised lamb that are fed mostly hay nowadays. Grass is expensive.
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Old 07-06-2016, 07:12 PM   #86
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Lamb loin chops...right. Damn...those are expensive. Mini T-Bone lamb. I've never cooked them because I've always thought them to expensive

I was trying to harken back to decades ago, when a lamb chop was a lamb chop. It looked like it, it quacked like it.

Today, I see mainly small t-bone shaped loin and shoulder lamb chops at the supermarket. Some of those cuts look wierd.

Just gimme a simple lamb chop! ...a leg lamb chop. Oval, a bone at one end...
The label on those loin lamb chops is dated Jan 19, '10, and I only wish they were still $4.99 lb.! They're close to twice that price now. In all honesty I'll pay the price because I think they are worth it.
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Old 07-06-2016, 07:33 PM   #87
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I'm starting to forget about buying American Farms lamb for stew packages and buy fresh cut lamb...chops or whatever. Then dice them up into cubes. It's gonna be a hell of a cost increase making my lamb curry stew now. It shouldn't be like that.

I'm serious. This companies "lamb for stew" looks and tastes just like chunks of beef. Overly hay fed lamb.

Stupid way it has to be.
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Old 07-06-2016, 11:22 PM   #88
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The label on those loin lamb chops is dated Jan 19, '10, and I only wish they were still $4.99 lb.! They're close to twice that price now. In all honesty I'll pay the price because I think they are worth it.
For a once or twice a year treat, I agree with you.
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Old 07-07-2016, 10:59 AM   #89
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Shoulder lamb chops these days have a lot of fat running thru them. I remember years ago my parents buying lamb chops from the Navy commissary. They were oval shaped with a round bone towards one end. No fat running thru them. Today's lamb shoulder chops are fatty. When I do see one that looks lean, I freeze them. I have 2 or 3 halfway decent looking ones frozen. They still don't look like they did from decades past. Times have changed.

In the UK (at least, in my part of it) we call these chops "chump" chops. They don't seem very easy to come by these days even in "proper" butchers. The last ones I bought had to be cut specially for me.
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Old 07-10-2016, 04:31 AM   #90
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If you are looking to buy lamb that has lamb flavor, the best time to buy imported lamb is just prior to the Orthodox Easter. In the winter I buy whatever lamb is on sale and cut it up for stew with barley. I just seems like a waste of time and money to expect any decent lamb at that time. What usually is coming to market are young rams when the flocks are being culled.
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How Should Lamb Chops be Cooked? We skipped going to the Bacon Fest and went and had dinner at a place that we had never been to before. BIG MISTAKE.:ohmy: First off I think some Yelp reviewers are liars. I would only have rated the place a 1, and that's just because I'm nice.They gave the place almost 5 stars.. Seriously? That being said. I went out of my comfort zone and ordered what should have been Lamb chops. It was the Special on the dinner menu. They were chopped alright. Never having it before I'm suspecting they over cooked it. Is Ketchup supposed to accompany it? I thought mint jelly was the rule. It was tough as nails. dry as dust, flavorless. S&P was the only seasoning. Is that the way it should have been cooked? Hubby and I traded plates. He's such a gentleman. :flowers: Ummm, the fish and chips that he ordered wasn't Cod as the menu said it was supposed to be. Rubber bands was more like it. Our dogs loved it. They would.:rolleyes: 3 stars 1 reviews
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